Historical Fulton, N.Y.: The Broadway bridge

As work continues on the newest upgrade to the Broadway bridge in Fulton, here is a photo of it being built. There was no date on this photo, but it seems to be 1915, when the city redid the original iron bridge structure and made a concrete fix to the bridge deck. According to the Friends of History, there were four bridges before the Broadway bridge — two early ones were wooden and both washed away. After the Civil War, an iron bridge was put in to improve the strength of the bridge. But it was built with a rise on the deck going from east to west. It was such a steep rise that when the bridge was icy in the winter, men had to get out of the trolley cars when they used the bridge and push the trollies up the hill over the bridge. The 1915 work realigned the deck so it was flat. That fix on the bridge cost $200,000 and a Lester Paddoch loaned the city $8,000 to finish the job. The bridge was revamped again in 1966 at the cost of $2 million. This current work at the bridge costs $12.2 million. Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
As work continues on the newest upgrade to the Broadway bridge in Fulton, here is a photo of it being built. There was no date on this photo, but it seems to be 1915, when the city redid the original iron bridge structure and made a concrete fix to the bridge deck. According to the Friends of History, there were four bridges before the Broadway bridge — two early ones were wooden and both washed away. After the Civil War, an iron bridge was put in to improve the strength of the bridge. But it was built with a rise on the deck going from east to west. It was such a steep rise that when the bridge was icy in the winter, men had to get out of the trolley cars when they used the bridge and push the trollies up the hill over the bridge. The 1915 work realigned the deck so it was flat. That fix on the bridge cost $200,000 and a Lester Paddoch loaned the city $8,000 to finish the job. The bridge was revamped again in 1966 at the cost of $2 million. This current work at the bridge costs $12.2 million.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com

Lunch outing to Fulton

Lunchtime. Residents at Morningstar Residential Care Center recently enjoyed an outing to Mr. Mike’s in Fulton for a leisurely lunch as they enjoyed the waterfront view of Lake Neatahwanta. The outing was one of the many that Morningstar offers to its residents, including a picnic lunch July 16 at Wright’s Landing in Oswego. Located at 17 Sunrise Drive in Oswego, Morningstar Residential Care Center is a family-owned and operated, 120-bed long-term and sub-acute skilled nursing facility with full rehabilitation services. For more information you may contact them at 342-4790 or visit them online at morningstarcares.com. Seated from left are Beatrice Denny, Donna Franczak, and Linda Corelli. Standing from left are: Director of Activities for Morningstar Kelsey Rose, Activities Aides Heidi Baldwin and Doreen Shortt.
Lunchtime. Residents at Morningstar Residential Care Center recently enjoyed an outing to Mr. Mike’s in Fulton for a leisurely lunch as they enjoyed the waterfront view of Lake Neatahwanta. The outing was one of the many that Morningstar offers to its residents, including a picnic lunch July 16 at Wright’s Landing in Oswego. Located at 17 Sunrise Drive in Oswego, Morningstar Residential Care Center is a family-owned and operated, 120-bed long-term and sub-acute skilled nursing facility with full rehabilitation services. For more information you may contact them at 342-4790 or visit them online at morningstarcares.com. Seated from left are Beatrice Denny, Donna Franczak, and Linda Corelli. Standing from left are: Director of Activities for Morningstar Kelsey Rose, Activities Aides Heidi Baldwin and Doreen Shortt.

Music fun at the Hannibal Senior Dining Center

Bob Simmons recently entertained on his accordian at the Hannibal Senior Dining and Activities Center.  The center is a program of Oswego County Opportunities and is partially supported by the Oswego County Office for the Aging, the New York State Office for the Aging, and the United Way of Greater Oswego. The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Call Center Manager Rosemary Kellogg at 564-5471 for information or luncheon reservations.
Bob Simmons recently entertained on his accordian at the Hannibal Senior Dining and Activities Center. The center is a program of Oswego County Opportunities and is partially supported by the Oswego County Office for the Aging, the New York State Office for the Aging, and the United Way of Greater Oswego. The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Call Center Manager Rosemary Kellogg at 564-5471 for information or luncheon reservations.

Look for August opening of revamped Broadway bridge

Work continues on the rehabilitation of the Broadway bridge in downtown Fulton.

Gene Cilentro of the state Department of Transportation said the northside deck has been poured and continues to cure. The decorative railing was poured Thursday and Friday and then it must cure over the course of a few weeks.

“The project is 85 percent to 90 percent done,” Cilento said.

He said the sidewalks will be the last parts of the project to be done. The sidewalk on the north side will be done first and then lamp posts will be installed.

Cilento said one that sets, the full four lanes will open and then the sidewalk on the south side will go, probably in mid- to late August.

The new sidewalk has a cure time as well.

Phone app could help Oswego County businesses

In an effort to help local businesses and attractions reach potential visitors in the Finger Lakes region, the Oswego County Department of Community Development, Tourism and Planning has offered to underwrite a portion of the cost of listings in the Finger Lakes “Go and Do” app.

The county tourism office is partnering with Cayuga Media, publishers of the Auburn Citizen, Skaneateles Journal and www.auburnpub.com, to offer a discounted listing on the app for one year.

Continue reading

How does the garden grow at Bishop’s Commons?

A personal touch! Pictured (left to right) is Bishop’s Commons Activities Assistant Amanda Walker as she works along with Bishop’s Commons resident Sylvia Proano, who has “adopted” one of the decorative planters that residents have personalized with their favorite flowers or even vegetables, located around the enriched living residence. After planting their favorites, each resident cares for their planter throughout the summer.
A personal touch! Pictured (left to right) is Bishop’s Commons Activities Assistant Amanda Walker as she works along with Bishop’s Commons resident Sylvia Proano, who has “adopted” one of the decorative planters that residents have personalized with their favorite flowers or even vegetables, located around the enriched living residence. After planting their favorites, each resident cares for their planter throughout the summer.

Residents at Bishop’s Commons in Oswego have “adopted” standing planters that can be found near the walkways surrounding the residence, and have set about personalizing them to reflect each individual’s unique taste and preferences.

By adopting a 3-foot-high planter, each resident has selected his or her favorite things to grow — whether it be flowers or vegetables — and after planting has taken on the responsibility of making sure the planters are well cared for throughout the summer.

“The planter project has turned out to be a lot of fun for our folks, many of whom had enjoyed tending their own gardens throughout their lives,” said Cheryl Cullinan, director of activities.

“We supply the planters, dirt and tools while our residents picked out some of their favorite flowers or vegetables to plant; and have been caring for their planters’ diligently for the last few weeks,” Cullinan said. “The planters have become a source of pride and add to the overall attractiveness of the grounds around Bishop’s Commons.”

Your hometown. Your news.