Stone Soup success

by Lois Luber, United Way of Greater Oswego County

I extend a heartfelt thank you to all those who lent their support to the United Way’s fourth annual Stone Soup Too Luncheon graciously hosted by Holy Trinity Parish in Fulton.

From the large amount of people who attended, to the many businesses and organizations that helped make the event possible, our Stone Soup Too Luncheon was a perfect example of the United Way’s mantra: “It’s Our Community…and It’s Personal” as the community came together to show their support for the United Way and help our area food pantries.

Our Stone Soup Luncheon would not have been possible if not for the efforts of our committee members; Catherine Trowbridge, City of Fulton; Helen Hoefer and George Timmins of Catholic Charities of Oswego County; Steve Chirello, Chirello Advertising; Karen Hubel, Blue Moon Grill; Lori Lyons and Michele Sherman of the Walmart Supercenter in Granby; Jo-Lynn Phillips and Stephanie Budd of OCO; Sue Witmer of Cayuga Community College Fulton Campus; Jan Rebeor, and our volunteers.

Thanks to the support we received from community members who attended, the generous donations of $500 from the Fulton Lions Club and $100 from the Fulton Sunrise Rotary, our fifth Annual Stone Soup Too Luncheon raised $1,125 for food pantries in Oswego County.

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Wharendorf and Sanford earn personal top scores for North Country Gymnastics

North Country Level 4, 5 and 7 gymnasts recently competed in the Girls Rock Invitational in Henrietta. Six area teams participated. Pictured is Level 4 gymnast Corinne Clarke. Clarke earned her top score of the season on floor exercises.
North Country Level 4, 5 and 7 gymnasts recently competed in the Girls Rock Invitational in Henrietta. Six area teams participated. Pictured is Level 4 gymnast Corinne Clarke. Clarke earned her top score of the season on floor exercises.

North Country Level 4, 5 and 7 gymnasts recently competed in the Girls Rock Invitational in Henrietta. Six area teams participated.

Level 4 gymnast Alyssa Wharendorf earned her best overall score of the season with a 32.05. Myah Sanford placed third overall with her top score of 34.7 at Level 5.

Level 4: In the 8-9 year old age group, Elena Ruzekowicz placed fifth on vault with a 9.0 and earned 10th all around with a 33.0. Corinne Clarke saw her top score of the season on floor with an 8.5 and took 11th all around with a 32.90.

Kiersten Abbott’s best performance this season on bars in the 10 and up age group earned her an 8.75, which was good for fourth place. Abbott placed 14th all around with a score of 33.05.

Alyssa Wahrendorf gave her best performance this year, with her top scores in all events. She placed 13th on vault with an 8.8, 14th on the uneven bars with a 7.4, 16th on beam with an 8.0 and 13th on floor with a 7.58.

Balance beam was Eliza Runeare’s top event, placing 13th with an 8.3 and placing 16th overall with a 31.6.

Julia Granato’s performance on vault ranked her seventh in her age group with a 9.1 and 17th over all with a 31.10.

Level 5: In the 10-11 year old division, Emma Sanford’s top event was floor, placing third with an 8.4 and placing third overall with a 33.0.

Samantha Perkins showed improvement on vault, coming in third with a 7.9 and taking sixth overall with a 29.9.

Myah Sanford gave her best performance on the season on floor, taking second in the 12 and up age group with a 9.3.  Sanford also took second on vault (8.5), third on uneven bars (8.1) and second on balance beam (8.8).

Sarah Perkins’ earned an 8.1 on beam to place fifth in her best event, also taking sixth overall with a 29.6.

Floor exercise was Madison Bartkowiak’s top event, placing seventh with a 7.5 and seventh overall with a 27.6.

Level 7: Ashley Rizzo earned her best score this season on vault, coming in seventh with an 8.2.  Rizzo’s performance on beam placed her third in her level with an 8.3 and sixth overall with a 30.6.

County’s high schools invited to local GENIUS environmental competition

SUNY Oswego has launched an Oswego County branch of the college’s global GENIUS Olympiad competition for local high school student projects aimed at highlighting or solving environmental issues.

The new science competition among students from area high schools will take place 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 17 in the Campus Center arena, concurrent with Quest, the college’s day to celebrate the scholarly and creative activities of students, faculty and staff.

“It’s very exciting, and the winning school will receive a $2,000 stipend to do a sustainability project at their school,” said Tammy Elowsky, assistant director of the SUNY Oswego Office of Business and Community Relations, helping organize the fledgling competition for the Civic Engagement Coalition at the college.

The winning student or two-student team in the Oswego County competition will receive an automatic entry for the 2013 global GENIUS finals, June 16 to 21 at the college, Elowsky said.

Students and their projects from G. Ray Bodley High School in Fulton and Paul V. Moore High School in Central Square are among early entrants for the local GENIUS competition.

Elowsky said that initially she spoke with Fehmi Damkaci, the foudner of GENIUS and associate provost for graduate studies at the college, about putting together a traditional science fair to encourage young minds toward further education.

“How do we keep students studying here, perhaps staying here?” wondered Elowsky. “By getting them interested in and thinking about college.”

Damkaci suggested she consider organizing a local GENIUS competition.

The GENIUS Olympiad, now in its third year, invites high school students from around the world to compete for finalist spots each June in a juried exhibition and weeklong series of educational events.

Nearly 300 finalists, accompanied by 139 mentors, participated in 2012 from 49 countries and 30 states.

Elowsky, who began working at the college a year ago, recalled being impressed last year when she toured the GENIUS exhibition and spoke with students.

“I was blown away by how intelligent these high school students are,” Elowsky said.  “It really started me thinking.”

The local competitors will set up their new exhibition in the midst of the annual Sustainability Fair, which also takes place on Quest day.

Among the high school entries are “The Effects of the Round Goby on Local Fish Populations,” “The Footprint of a Domestic Cat” and “How Economic Status Influences Environmental Views.”

“Everything at the Sustainability Fair will be going on around us,” Elowsky said. “The (energy-saving) cars will be right behind us. So the students will get a lot of exposure.”

Parking is free April 17 for visitors to Quest, whose hundreds of talks, panel discussions, demonstrations and concurrent events, such as the local GENIUS competition and the Sustainability Fair and Symposium, will take place largely in the Campus Center and nearby Lanigan and Snygg halls.

Fulton girls lacrosse splits first two games of the season

by Rob Tetro

The Fulton girls varsity lacrosse team went 1-1 during its first two games of the season.

March 26, Christian Brothers Academy got off to a solid start while cruising to a convincing win over the Lady Raiders.

However, during its next game, Fulton showed that it is capable of, getting off to a hot start.

The Lady Raiders jumped out to a seven-goal lead during the first half of their March 29th game against Whitesboro en route to a solid win.

Christian Brothers Academy got off to an impressive start and didn’t look back. CBA built an 11-goal lead over Fulton during the first half.

Despite a couple of goals by Kate Rothrock during the second half, the Lady Raiders were unable to cut into the deficit they faced. Christian Brothers Academy coasted to a 16-2 win over Fulton.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

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Bald eagle sightings along the Oswego River

Several bald eagles have been sighted in recent weeks along the Oswego River on State Route 48 between Minetto and Oswego. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed bald eagles from the list of Threatened and Endangered Species in 2007 but they are still listed as threatened on the New York State Endangered species list.
Several bald eagles have been sighted in recent weeks along the Oswego River on State Route 48 between Minetto and Oswego. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed bald eagles from the list of Threatened and Endangered Species in 2007 but they are still listed as threatened on the New York State Endangered species list.

Sightings of bald eagles have been reported along the Oswego River recently. Several have been spotted in the Minetto area starting by Gray Road to just before the Midway Drive-In.

“Bald eagles are known for congregating near areas with open water and Oswego County has several pristine natural areas, such as the Salmon River corridor, that attract our national bird,” said David Turner, director of the Oswego County Department of Community Development, Tourism and Planning.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed bald eagles from the list of Threatened and Endangered Species in 2007 but they are still listed as threatened on the New York State Endangered species list.

“In the 1960s, there was one nest reported, and as of now there have been 130 to 140 nests reported,” said ornithologist Gerry Smith, former president of the Onondaga Chapter of the National Audubon Society.

“There are more bald eagles in our parts of the world, which includes Lake Ontario and the Oswego River area, than there has been for at least a century or possibly more.”

“The bald eagle population continues to increase, therefore sightings of them will increase along with the number of birds seen at one time,” said NYS Department of Environmental Conservation spokeswoman Lori Severino.

“They typically nest in mature trees in forested areas near the shorelines of large wetland complexes, rivers, lakes or oceans.”

The breeding season of the bald eagle starts in January, and eggs are laid in late February to early April. The eggs hatch after being incubated for 35 days. The young eaglets remain with their parents through the end of summer.

It takes five years for the birds to mature to the point where they develop the familiar white head and tail of our national symbol.

Bald eagles are resourceful feeders who hunt fish, waterfowl, shorebirds, small mammals and reptiles.

They will also search for deer carcasses in the winter.

The best time to see the bald eagles is in the early morning, even before sunrise, when they are looking for food in the open waters.

Manors at school functions

by Suezette Dunham, Fulton

When you accuse someone of talking, I would suggest for you to have the decency to address the right person. Last night, I was treated very poorly by a man with no manors. He stood up and looked straight at me and said, “Would you please be quite for the rest of the concert!”

First sir, I was being quiet, and second, there are two ways to address such things and that was not the way. You are very rude and disrespectful. Let me enlighten you in the correct way of doing things.

If someone is annoying you, you turn and very nicely shush them. That is the correct way of doing things. You gave a fine example of what to do if you want to be rude (to the entire school). What a nice lesson for the kids who are already going through a tough time to see.

I am sure that you can tell by the way that I have written this up, I do believe in manners. Too many people do not. If you had looked at me, you would have seen that I was not talking, just watching the orchestra. I do not believe in putting anyone down in public, but since you were so kind to do it to me, I will be glad to return the favor.

Employees allege coworker viewed pornography at work

by Carol Thompson

Several employees of the Oswego County Highway Department have alleged that a co-worker has been using the county computer to view pornographic pictures and videos for approximately two years while on taxpayer time.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, four employees, all whistleblowers, said they have witnessed the employee viewing the x-rated material on many occasions on a computer at the county’s Parish highway garage.

Additionally, they allege that while their coworker spent much time on the computer looking at pictures and watching videos, the coworker also racked up overtime hours each week.

The employees further allege that they brought their concerns to management to no avail, so they turned to a legislator for help in bringing it to an end.

Legislator Doug Malone said he was contacted, and after speaking with the employees, requested Oswego County District Attorney Gregory Oakes look into the matter.

The computer was removed from the premises a few weeks ago, the employees allege, although they are not aware of where it went once it left. The employees claim that Highway Superintendent Kurt Ospelt removed the computer.

Malone said Oakes told him the computer was removed and rather than be examined by the county’s IT Department, it was sent out for inspection.

Malone said that Oakes telephoned him and advised him that pornography was found in the computer, but because it wasn’t child pornography, there would be no criminal charges.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

Dawn Drought, Fulton resident

Dawn M. Drought, 54, of Fulton, died suddenly Thursday, March 28, 2013 at home.

She was predeceased by her mother, Arlene Berry Drought in 2001.

Surviving are her father, Herbert Drought of Fulton; sister, Debbie (Jim) Rogalavich of Liverpool; uncle, Royce (Jeanette) Drought of Camden; aunts, Lenora Drought of Amboy Center and Lorena Wright of Candor; and several cousins.

Calling hours are from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 2 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay Street in Fulton with services immediately following.

Interment will be in Fairdale Rural Cemetery, Hannibal at a future date.

Memorials are encouraged to Oswego County SPCA-OCAWL, P.O. Box 442, Fulton, NY 13069.

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