Churches plan Easter services

by Andrew Henderson

Local churches are planning their Passion Week and Easter services.

State Street United Methodist Church will be holding several services.

A Palm Sunday service will be held tomorrow, March 24 at 11 a.m.

From March 25 through March 27, there will be prayer and praise services at 7 p.m.

Maundy Thursday, March 28, there will be a traditional Tenebrae service with communion and an optional foot washing at 7 p.m. at the Phoenix Methodist church.

March 30 at 7 p.m., there will be a prayer and praise service.

March 31, the Easter service will be at 11 a.m.

The congregation at Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church will be holding a Good Friday service at 6 p.m. March 29.

“We will gather to remember the terrible sacrifice that was required in order to secure our redemption,” said Pastor David Grey. “For those who lived through that day it was a day of fear, of great disappointment and of unspeakable horror. We today call that Friday, “good” only in hindsight, because we know what was accomplished on that day.”

The church will also hold an Easter Sunrise Service March 31 at 7 a.m.

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Fulton Cross Walk to be held

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The Fulton Good Friday Cross Walk will be held Friday, March 29 at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot of Holy Trinity Parish, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton. Rev. Mark Kimpland will lead in the opening of the walk. Walkers will take turns carrying a large wooden cross in the downtown section of the City of Fulton.

The Fulton Good Friday Cross Walk will be held Friday, March 29 at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot of Holy Trinity Parish, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton.

Rev. Mark Kimpland will lead in the opening of the walk. Walkers will take turns carrying a large wooden cross in the downtown section of the City of Fulton.

A total of ten stations of the cross will be observed.  Each station will include scripture, prayer and the singing of a hymn.

The cross walk will conclude about noon at its final destination, First United Church of Fulton, 33 S. Third St.

Everyone who has taken part in the walk and has provided assistance to walkers will be welcomed to a soup and bread lunch provided by the board of deacons of First United Church. There is no cost for the luncheon.

The Cross Walk is sponsored annually by the Greater Fulton Area Council of Christian Churches. It is comprised of those member congregations who support ecumenical programs that include the annual Michaud Memorial Service, the Community Thanksgiving Worship service, and the annual CROP WALK, which raises funds for world hunger, and for local food pantries.

Those seeking further information may call Rev. David Nethercott at 592-2707.

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Fulton baseball team gearing up for challenging season

86490800by Rob Tetro

After the first days of practice, Fulton varsity baseball coach Kip Harvey was pleased with the effort his players displayed.

However, he is quick to point out that the Red Raiders still have a lot of work to do to be ready for the season.

According to Harvey, being ready for the season means that his players will be ready to work towards achieving its goals.

This season, Fulton will aim to play every team as competitively as possible. They also want to be in a position to be playing for a league championship while also qualifying for sectional play.

The Red Raiders appear to be a team that will lack varsity level experience in 2013. There are only five seniors on the roster, but four of them were starters a year ago. They are Cody Dick,  Jake Crucitti, Adam Briggs, Ron Smith and Shane Beauregard.

The team will feature four juniors who will be moving into starting positions this season. Those players are Jeremy Langdon, Nick Summerville, Dan Coant and Kirby LaBeef. Sophomores John Cummins, Peter Ravesi, Chris Jones and freshman Michael Bolster are all debuting at the varsity level this season.

Harvey appears to have a lot of confidence in Cummins, Ravesi, Jones and Bolster. He expects them to earn a lot of playing time this season.

At this point, the Red Raiders have not named any captains. However, Harvey pointed out that he expects Dick to pick up where he left off as captain in 2012. Harvey credited Dick for his leadership abilities, which include being a mature and responsible individual.

He suggested that maturity is the most important characteristic that he hopes to identify in someone who aims to be a captain on his team.

According to Harvey, a captain is a positive individual who encourages his teammates to be better rather than holding them back. He also pointed out that a captain is a trustworthy individual whose presence encourages teammates to follow and duplicate.

Harvey credited Dick for meeting nearly all of the expectations he has for a captain.

This season, Fulton will look to emphasize solid defensive execution. Harvey said that mistake free defensive play could allow them to be as consistently competitive as they hope to be.

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Granby highway vehicles

by Jane Crego, Granby  

Granby taxpayers, do you know what your tax dollars are being used for?

For instance, did you know that your tax dollars pay for a Granby Highway Department worker (not the superintendent, but an hourly worker) to drive to and from work in a vehicle paid for by you?

Did you know that the same vehicle is being used by some of the Granby Highway Department employees to plow their personal driveways?

Did you know that Granby Town Highway Superintendent Ray Sullivan take a truck home at night, too?

Did you know the highway superintendent has informed Town Supervisor Ed Williamson that he can spend taxpayer money any way he wants?

I think that this is really messed up. We elected the town officials for Granby expecting that they were going to do everything in their power to protect the citizens’ tax dollars from frivolous, unnecessary spending.

I have to pay for, insure, and fuel a vehicle to drive to work every day to pay these taxes. I am confident that we pay town highway workers enough so that they can pay for their own transportation. Why are we paying for this employee’s gas as well? Shouldn’t he be responsible just like the rest of us?

If our elected leaders can’t ensure that our tax dollars are being spent wisely, then maybe it’s time to replace our elected leaders. This is a vicious circle — they spend more than they should, increase our taxes, which increases spending, which increases our taxes again.

We need to stop this insane spending in our town and other areas of government.

There’s a ban on brush burning

Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes is reminding Oswego County residents that all residential brush burning is prohibited during the historically high fire risk period between March 16 and May 14.

Forbes said that New York State’s open burning regulation, which was passed in 2009, bans open burning from March 16 through May 14. It also prohibits the burning of garbage at all times and places.

“Although last spring was not as dry as some in the past, county firefighters responded to over 40 grass and brush fires,” said Forbes. “These potentially dangerous fires can spread rapidly and ignite sheds, barns, garages and houses. People need to be aware of how rapidly a fire can spread and the amount of damage it can cause.

“Grass and brush fires also cost our local fire departments thousands of dollars in fuel, equipment and apparatus cost, and cost the firefighters in lost wages due to time away from work and additional time away from their families,” he added.

According to State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens, since the open burning regulation passed in 2009, there are a fewer number of fires reported in New York State this time of year.

“I urge everyone to be cautious with the risk of wildfires and remind all New Yorkers that the statewide ban is in effect through mid-May,” said Martens.

In 2009, New York toughened restrictions on open burning to reduce harmful air pollutants and help prevent wildfires.

While the burn ban regulation allows residential brush burning for most of the year in towns with a populations of less than 20,000, it prohibits open burning in all communities during early spring when the bulk of New York’s wildfires typically occur.

The state regulation prohibits the burning of garbage at all times and in all places.

Several factors enable wildfires to start easily and spread quickly at this time, including the lack of green vegetation, abundance of available fuels such as dry grass and leaves, warm temperatures and wind.

Open burning is the largest single cause of wildfires in New York State.

Data from DEC’s Forest Protection Division shows that debris burning accounted for about 36 percent of wildfires in the state between 1985 and 2009, which is more than twice the next most-cited cause.

In addition, from 2000 to 2009 New York’s fire departments responded to an average of 2,300 wildfires each year from March 14 to May 16. That represents about 46 percent of all wildfires for the year.

Fire department data for 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated a 35 percent reduction in wildfires during the burn ban period for those years when compared to the previous 10 years (2000-2009).

In addition, 80 percent of all communities across the state had a reduction of wildfires compared with the previous ten years.

Violators of the open burning state regulation are subject to both criminal and civil enforcement actions, with a minimum fine of $500 for a first offense.

Schroeppel resident charged with sex abuse

by Andrew Henderson

A 19-year-old Schroeppel resident was arrested Tuesday after he allegedly had sex with two minor females in 2012, according to the New York State Police.

Investigators from the Fulton barracks arrested Paul C. Nowakowski, 19, of 454 Chesbro Rd., and charged him with one count of second-degree rape, a class D felony; two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, a class A misdemeanor); and one count of sexual misconduct, a class A misdemeanor.

The investigation revealed that Nowakowski reportedly had sex with a 13-year-old and a 14-year-old in 2012. He was arraigned in the Town of Schroeppel Court.

He was remanded to the Oswego County Jail in lieu of $1,000 cash or $2,000 bond. He was scheduled to re-appear in the Town of Schroeppel Court Wednesday.

State Police suspect there may be additional victims of abuse by Nowakowski and are asking for anyone who may have information contact them at 598-2112.

Heaven M. Bristol, 27, of 2657 N.Y.S. Rte. 3 Lot E-14, Fulton, was arrested March 6 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with petit larceny.

Andrew J. Clark, 28, of 309 Cayuga St. Apt. 2, Fulton, was arrested March 6 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance and unlawful possession of marijuana.

Mathew E. Mushtare, 53, of 424 Main St., Phoenix, was arrested March 6 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with driving while ability impaired by drugs, following too closely and unlicensed operator.

Jeremy C. Bogan, 26, of 621 1/2 W. Fourth St. S., Fulton, was arrested March 11 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with aggravated driving while intoxicated, driving while intoxicated, speed in zone, failure to obey traffic control device, and unlawful possession of marijuana.

Brandon S. O’Bryan, 26, of 315 Oneida St. Apt. 2, Fulton, was arrested March 11 by members of the Fulton Police Department on a warrant. He was charged with second-degree menacing, fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon, endangering the welfare of a child and second-degree harassment.

Theodore M. Hennigan, 24, of 58 N. Fourth St., Fulton, was arrested March 11 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with second-degree criminal contempt and petit larceny.

Curtis S. Gibson, 27, of 239 Co. Rte. 29, Oswego, was arrested March 12 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with unlawful possession of marijuana and passing a red light.

David J. Flood, 43, of 213 Phillps St., Fulton was arrested March 12 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with third-degree criminal mischief.

Samantha A. Perez, 21, of 49 E. Ninth St. Apt. 3, Oswego, was arrested March 12 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with petit larceny and unlawful possession of marijuana.

Cory R. Jardin, 28, of 36349 Five Acre Ln., Zephyr Hills, Fla., was arrested March 13 on a warrant by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with second-degree burglary and fourth-degree grand larceny.

Jonathan Alvarado, 40, of 316 Erie St. Apt. 1, Fulton, was arrested March 15 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with second-degree harassment.

Jack L. Wright, Jr., 34, of 1456 Co. Rte. 57, Phoenix, was arrested March 15 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with second-degree criminal contempt and disorderly conduct.

Donald E. Bort III, 18, of 20 Airport Rd. Building 8 Apt. 4, Fulton, was arrested March 16 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with driving while intoxicated, driving while intoxicated with a blood alcohol content greater than .08 percent, unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle, and unlawful possession of marijuana.

John F. Lachut Jr., 21, of 207 Phillips St., Fulton, was arrested March 16 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with failing to comply with a lawful order, unlicensed operator and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

Eric Drought, 30, of 610 Buffalo St., Williamstown and Fulton, was arrested March 16 by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with petit larceny and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Adam J. Hart, 20, of 56 Davis St., Phoenix, was arrested March 15 by members of the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office and charged with first-degree sex abuse and endangering the welfare of a child.

Joseph D. Reynolds, 23, of 312 Utica St. Apt. 2, Fulton, was arrested March 8 on a warrant by members of the Fulton Police Department and charged with second-degree criminal sale of marijuana and endangering the welfare of a child.

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Anthony DeBalso Jr., Baldwinsville resident

OBITS-DeBalsoAnthonyaAnthony J. DeBalso Jr., 77, of Baldwinsville, died Monday, March 18.

He was predeceased by his father, Anthony J. DeBalso; his mother, Florence (Picciano) DeBalso; and brother, Michael DeBalso.

Surviving are his wife, Gail Davis-DeBalso; son, Dennis; daughters, Crystal (Glenn) MacDougall and Andrea (Ray) Nichols; stepchildren, Kimberly (Art) Sandford, Kevin (Donna) Clark, and John Dodge; siblings, Florence Guifre and Jerry DeBalso; four grandchildren; seven step-grandchildren; two great-grandsons; and many nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 28 in the Community Wesleyan Church, 112 Downer St., Baldwinsville. There are no calling hours.

Contributions may be made to any animal shelter or homeless shelter.

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