Young pals

RoyHodge_WEBby Roy Hodge

Catching up with the little guys:

Marcus, my youngest grandson, lives in Rochester. He is going to be three next month. He keeps his Mommy and Daddy — who also happen to be my daughter-in-law, Shelley, and my son, Adam — very busy.

Marcus goes to “school” every week day (we call it day care) and has a good time. I met Marcus when he was one, after he had been in America only a few days after the trip from his native Ethiopia.

Marcus has fun with his doggie friends Dunkin’ and Sophie and enjoys going camping with his Mommy and Daddy. The latest video we have seen of Marcus show him having a great time on a twisty-turny slide at a playground.

My little great-grandson, Colton Manning, will be two in July. He has been living in Centreville, Virginia, near Washington, D. C.  He will be moving on Memorial Day weekend with his parents, Courtney, my granddaughter, and Chris Manning, to Wake Forest, N.C.

Colton recently sang, loud and clear, “Happy Birthday” to his Mommy. A few days later, on Mother’s Day, he was decked out in his Santa Claus pajamas wishing Mommy a “Happy Momma’s Day.”

My two neighborhood buds have also been keeping busy this spring. Andrew is going to be five later this month and will go to kindergarten in September.

When he told me that he was going to be five, I asked two-year-old Nathan how old he was.  “Sixteen,” he answered.

“Wow, you’re sixteen?” I said.

“He’s counting up to twenty now,” his father said.

Sixteen is apparently one of his favorite numbers. Okay, sixteen it is.

Nathan is following a familiar path around our back yard very close to the one Andrew trod a couple of years ago. He follows the brick paths through the garden, pats Joe the Gnome (Andrew named him), checks out everything in the garden and the old fireplace which is part of the garden, and completes the tour with a rinsing of hands and face and a hearty splashing in the garden’s bird baths.

It should be an interesting summer.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Class of 2013’s top two students

Mary West and Katelyn Caza, seniors at G. Ray Bodley High school, have earned this year’s title of valedictorian and salutatorian. The students are good friends and have many things in common, including their hard work ethic and involvement in school and the community.
Mary West and Katelyn Caza, seniors at G. Ray Bodley High school, have earned this year’s title of valedictorian and salutatorian. The students are good friends and have many things in common, including their hard work ethic and involvement in school and the community.

by Nicole Reitz

Mary West and Katelyn Caza, seniors at G. Ray Bodley High school, have earned this year’s title of valedictorian and salutatorian.

The students are good friends and have many things in common, including their hard work ethic and involvement in school and the community.

West’s final grade point average came to 103.092. She thought at the beginning of the school year that she was fourth in the class of 2013, but it wasn’t until she met with her guidance counselor that she found out that she was in fact number one.

West has almost always been an A student, but her over-100 average comes from her advanced placement classes, which are weighted.

Like valedictorians of past years, her favorite subjects are in math and the sciences.

“I like math because its definite and I’ve always been the best at it,” said West.

One of her favorite teachers is Mrs. Ryan, her AP Calculus teacher. “She’s always telling me how much she sees herself in me,” she said. “She has such big goals for all of us and she supports us no matter what.”

West also likes chemistry, so much so that she will be majoring in biochemistry at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the fall.

Last year, she got the Rensselaer Medal from the institute, along with a laptop scholarship.

West was attracted to RPI’s accreditations in engineering and science. It is also located 10 minutes from the state capital, where there are a lot of opportunities in the medical field.

West is the only Class of 2013 senior attending RPI. A lot of her friends will be going to college in the Rochester area, except her longtime best friend, who will be going to The College of St. Rose, minutes from RPI.

Branching out in college is what West considers her biggest challenge ahead. She is used to being around the same group of students from her AP classes. She is thinking of joining an intermural sports team, like ultimate frisbee.

West has already met a girl from Binghamton who she met on Facebook and will be her roommate.

“I’ve never had to share a room before, except with our dog,” said West.

West will enter RPI already having college credits. This year, she is taking AP calculus, biology, and micro/macroeconomics. She hasn’t given much thought yet to her graduation speech, because she is “just trying to survive AP tests right now.”

Recently, West wrote an essay for the Fulton Teachers Association, where she had to describe a specific experience with a teacher. West chose to write about Ms. Child-Dauphin, her AP World History Teacher for two years.

“I think she single handily helped me adjust to high school,” said West.

In middle school, West didn’t have to try for good grades, but started getting bad test scores in ninth grade world history.

“It wasn’t her, she wasn’t failing us, she was giving us everything we needed to succeed, I just wasn’t taking advantage of it,” said West. “The experience taught me a lot in terms of maturity, and facing the rest of my high school career.”

West also has Mr. Morse to thank, who influenced her enough to continue on with the sciences in college.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

In and Around Hannibal: May 18, 2013

by Rita Hooper 

706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

The Southwest Oswego United Methodist Church will be having a roast pork dinner today, May 18.  Serving starts at 4:30 p.m. with takeouts available.

The menu is roast pork, mashed potatoes, dressing and gravy, corn, cole slaw, roll, beverage and homemade pie for dessert.

Tonight is the Junior Prom – remember yours?  O’ how grown up and excited we felt. I wish all the juniors a safe and happy experience that will have good memories to last a lifetime.

The United Methodist Church of Hannibal Center/South Hannibal will be having a chicken barbecue Sunday, May 19 from noon until gone.

Dinner will consist of 1/2 chicken, baked beans, salt potatoes, macaroni salad, roll, dessert and a drink. Chicken halves will also be available.

Senior Meals will be meeting for lunch at the Senior Center (Library) on Oswego Street at noon, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

The menu for this week is:

Monday, May 20 roast pork and baked potatoes Monday; mac and cheese and stewed tomatoes Wednesday and crispy fish clippers and scalloped potatoes Friday.

Monday’s activity will be Wii bowling while Wednesday there will be music by Deanna Hubbard;  Friday’s activity will be the “Reminiscing the 40s” video.  Give Rosemary a call now and make your reservation at 564- 5471.

The Jammers will this Monday. If you enjoy country and Gospel music join them at the American Legion (Rochester Street) at 7 p.m. Bring a snack to share and an instrument if you play one and join in the fun.

The Hannibal Methodist Church is holding prayer meetings at the home of Jack Lenhard on Pine View Lane at 7 p.m. Tuesday evenings and at 1 p.m. Thursdays in the church dining room,. The church is located on Route 3, one block west of the Village Square. By the way the Methodist Church is serving lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. and all are invited.

The school election is May 21 and in addition to the budget, there will be one proposition to establish a capital fund.

The election of school board members will also be held at this time. Four candidates, Janice Scott, Vern Cole, Donna Ingersol and Mireille Watts will be running for the three vacant positions.

In order to vote in school elections, you must be 18, a resident of the school district for at least 30 days and a citizen of the United States.  You do not need to be registered or a property owner. Proof of residency will be asked for.

The Hannibal Sports Banquet is May 22 at 6 p.m.

Music Boosters will meet May 23 in the high school library at 7:30. School will be closed May 24 and 27 for Memorial Day.

The senior band concert is scheduled to be held Tuesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. in the high school auditorium. Again this year, the band is seeking alumni to join them for two selections in the concert. Music is now available from Mrs. Terrinoni so you will have plenty of time to practice.

The concert will also be very special as the senior band will be premiering  a new piece of music written in memory of past music booster president, Ed Carvey. Please add this special event to your calendar.

The Hannibal Alumni Association will hold its annual banquet on Saturday, June 15 at The Oasis Restaurant at Thunder Island, located at 21 Wilcox Rd. just off State Route 48 south of the City of Fulton.

Social Hour will begin at 5 p.m. with a buffet dinner being served at 6 p.m. Entertainment and dancing will be provided by Anybody’s Guess.

The Outstanding Alumnus Award will be presented to Fred Kent, Jr., class of 1963. Those in attendance from the classes of 1943, 1953, 1963, 1973, 1983, 1993 and 2003 will be honored.

Reservations with remittance may be sent to Faye Kimball, 32 Hannum Road, Hannibal, NY 13074 by May 28. For cost of dinner and dues please refer to posters around the area or call 564-7083 or 564-6690.

The  34th annual Hannibal Historical Society banquet will be held Monday, June 3 at the Hannibal United Methodist Church located at the corner of State Route 3 and West Street in the Village of Hannibal. A full course roast beef supper will be served at 6:30 p.m.

The Citizenship Award will be presented to Louie Gilbert, current commander of the Prior Stock Post of the American Legion. Louie will be recognized for his many years of service to community organizations, especially his efforts to benefit the Dollars for Scholars program which includes the annual Ducks Over the Dam every summer.

Reservations may be made by calling 564-6690 by May29th.

June 2, the Country Cruizers will be holding a chicken barbecue at the American Legion from noon until sold out. Come see their classic cars and ‘cruise’ in with yours!

Hannibal Home and School will be having a volunteer meeting on Monday June 10 from 2 to 3 p.m. at Fairley.  Come find out how you can help support your child’s school!  Contact Marian Calkins at 564-5872 or email hannibalhands@gmail.com for more information.

Plans are underway for the 21st Concert in the Park to be held at the Hannibal Firemen’s Field located on Rochester Street in the Village of Hannibal July 7.  Featured bands will be Anybody’s Guess, Fulton Community Dixieland Band and the Fulton Community Band.

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Fort Ontario to open for the season today

Fort Ontario State Historic Site opens today, May 18, and will host a variety of special events, including a French and Indian War living history event June 29 and 30. This year marks the 250th anniversary of the end of the French and Indian War, and the beginning of Pontiac’s Rebellion which ended at Oswego in 1766 with the Treaty of Fort Ontario. Re-enactors from around the United States and Canada will converge on Oswego to recreate the failed French attack on Fort Ontario in 1759 which helped seal the fate of France’s North American Colony.
Fort Ontario State Historic Site opens today, May 18, and will host a variety of special events, including a French and Indian War living history event June 29 and 30. This year marks the 250th anniversary of the end of the French and Indian War, and the beginning of Pontiac’s Rebellion which ended at Oswego in 1766 with the Treaty of Fort Ontario. Re-enactors from around the United States and Canada will converge on Oswego to recreate the failed French attack on Fort Ontario in 1759 which helped seal the fate of France’s North American Colony.

Fort Ontario State Historic Site will be open to the public today, May 18 to Sunday, Oct. 13.  Visiting hours will be Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The fort will be open seven days a week during the peak of tourist season from June 26 through Labor Day. Admission prices will remain the same as last year.

A wide range of special events are planned at the fort this year including a guided tour of the Post Cemetery today, May 18 at 1 p.m.

Curator Jennifer Emmons has been researching the lives and deaths of the 77 soldiers, officers, and civilians buried in post cemetery, which was moved to its current location in 1903.

The history and personal stories of those buried in the post cemetery reflect Fort Ontario’s significant role in world events from the French and Indian War through World War II.

Fort Ontario’s active role in military history continues today as the 444th Engineer Company, 479th Engineer Battalion, maintains a United States Army Reserve Center on the 75-acre Fort Ontario Military Reservation National Register District.

After World War II, the military reservation was divided into five sections; one part went to New York State to be developed as a historic site, a section to the Fitzgibbons Boiler Works, a small section to Lakeshore Trucking (railroad sidings), a parcel to the Army Reserve, and a large section to the City of Oswego on a 99-year lease to be used for educational, transportation, and recreational purposes only.

Recently, Historic Park Manager Ron Healt joined the fort’s management team and will oversee maintenance and major infrastructure improvement projects at Fort Ontario projected to continue through 2016.

Work in 2013 will focus on the two officer’s quarters and involve replacing or repairing window sash and cases, storm windows, shutters, doors, floor joists, sills, chimneys, roofs, gutters, revetments, and drainage.

Officers Quarters Two will be furnished this year, but Officers Quarters One will remain mostly unfurnished as building rehabilitation continues.

Having completed improvements in the two underground stone rifle galleries facing Oswego Harbor, for the first time since the early 1950s, all three underground stone rifle galleries and two artillery casemates will be open to the public.

Stone for the galleries, casemates, and walls of the fort came from a quarry located near the location of the post cemetery.

Contrary to popular opinion, the fort’s stone walls were not destroyed in battles. In reality, improvements begun in 1863 ended in 1872 when Congress ceased funding expensive construction on Great Lakes posts when Canada and the United States signed a treaty calling for an unarmed border.

In May 1872, the civilian workmen under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers packed up their tools and left the fort’s walls unfinished.

Over the winter the Friends of Fort Ontario purchased reproduction tin plates, cups, bottles, knives, forks, spoons, faux foods, crockery, utensils, and other items to recreate a U.S. Army kitchen-mess room as it may have appeared at Fort Ontario in 1868.

This new period room interpretation will be unveiled on opening day.

On most U.S. Army posts of the 19th century, kitchens and mess rooms (dining areas) were located in separate rooms in a barracks, but at some older posts such as Fort Ontario, cooking and eating functions were combined.

The 1868 kitchen-mess room, with its reproduction benches and tables, is designed so that it may be converted into an audio-visual room for power point lectures and programs in minutes.

The room will also be used for school group lunches and historic food-related programming and fund-raising events.

Fort Ontario State Historic Site is located at the north end of East Fourth Street in the City of Oswego, New York.

Arrests made in two separate meth lab investigations

by Andrew Henderson

Police investigations into two separate suspected methamphetamine labs resulted in the arrests of three county residents.

The Oswego Police Department reported the arrest of a homeless resident who is accused of manufacturing methamphetamine at 120 Liberty St. while the Oswego County Sheriff’s Department reported the arrest of a Hannibal resident and a Mexico resident who allegedly manufactured methamphetamine at 14 Country Ln., Hannibal.

Members of the Oswego Police Department’s Anti-Crime Team received information Wednesday that Shane C. Nolan, 32, was possibly manufacturing methamphetamine at an undetermined location within the City of Oswego.

Anti-Crime Team members, with the assistance of Criminal Investigation and Patrol Division members, located Nolan at 120 Liberty St.

While at that location, investigators determined that the structure likely contained a methamphetamine laboratory. The structure was evacuated and secured.

Additionally, Liberty Street between West Oneida Street and Turrill Street was closed off to vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

A search warrant for the property was applied for and granted by Oswego City Court Judge James Metcalf.

The New York State Police Contaminated Crime Scene Emergency Response Team was contacted and responded to the scene. The structure was searched and evidence of an inactive methamphetamine laboratory was seized as well as a small amount of finished methamphetamine.

Nolan was arrested and charged with third-degree unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine, a Class D felony, and unlawful disposal of methamphetamine laboratory material, a Class E felony.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Bullhead fishermen

Leon Archer
Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

This is the time of year that fishing a place like Sandy Pond is a real crap shoot.

The bullheads will still bite if you are in the right spot, but before you get one of them on your line, you are more likely to end up with a rambunctious sunfish or small perch.

Sometimes rock bass or even a black bass may find your night crawler to their liking. Of course, once night actually closes in, the panfish and other interlopers gradually quit biting, or at least they slow down greatly, but if you are in the wrong spot the bites will end entirely with no bullheads to replace them.

My father didn’t like to keep all the panfish when we were fishing for bullheads, but I usually put the biggest sunfish and any perch over 9 inches into my bucket.

Dad would give me a disapproving glance that could be translated as “What the heck are you doing?”

He would also remind me about the time I had stowed away my fifth or sixth panfish that it was going to be my job to clean the perch and sunfish, because he wasn’t going to do it. I noticed later on, however, that he wasn’t opposed to eating some of those same fish. I preferred bullheads just like he did, but I wasn’t ready to look a gift horse in the mouth.

Bullhead fishermen catch a lot fewer eels now than they did back before the big power dams went into the St. Lawrence River and the turbines began chopping up the mature eels as they migrated to the ocean to spawn.

My grandfather really liked eels and when dad or I caught a good sized one it went into the bucket for him. We caught a fair number of mud puppies at times, but they got a free pass back to the bottom. We never killed them, and we tried to unhook them without doing any more damage to them than we had to.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.
JuniorHonorSociety1

Middle school ceremony inducts 30 Junior Honor Society members

The newest members of the OMS National Junior Honor Society were recognized recently at induction ceremonies at the Richardson-Faust Theatre for the Performing Arts.
The newest members of the OMS National Junior Honor Society were recognized recently at induction ceremonies at the Richardson-Faust Theatre for the Performing Arts.

The Oswego Middle School National Junior Honor Society conducted its annual induction ceremony recently as 30 students signed the membership book and took the oath.

The NJHS was formed a year ago with two separate ceremonies for the seventh and eighth graders. However, the newest inductees were honored at ceremonies in the Oswego High School Robinson-Faust Theatre for the Performing Arts.

“Scholarship, leadership, service, character and citizenship” are the pillars of the National Junior Honor Society.

The formation of the OMS National Junior Honor Society was the culmination of a dream of Principal Mary Beth Fierro.

She said, “When I began as principal at OMS, I had many ideas for the school for raising as well as recognizing student achievement. One of those has become a reality in starting a chapter of the NJHS. I approached Sue Roik and Danielle Rombough about volunteering as co-advisors for this year and additionally five other faculty members volunteered to be part of the required NJHS Faculty Council.”

Oswego High School National Honor Society President Catherine Wells spoke to the students.

She said, “Selection into this organization is not merely based on grades, but on four pillars: Leadership, Character, Scholarship, and Service. Combined, these four pillars form a student of excellence; which is always the goal in our schools of excellence.

“When you are accepted as a member of the NHS or NJHS, you are held to a higher standard than your peers and hopefully rise to meet those heightened expectations,” she added. “I commend all of you for your hard work, I’m happy to see so many students invested in their academics and you are all becoming leaders in your school.”

Inducted as the latest members to the OMS NJHS were Adeline Benjamin, Liam Benjamin, Emily Bradshaw, Grace Bruns, Claudia Chetney, Danielle DelConte, Abby Donahue, Abigail Douglas, Morgan Familo, Laurin Furlong, Samantha Gardner, Kaitlyn Grant, Nicklas Holland, Rose Huang and Dain Jerred.

Also inducted were Lauren Jones, Eleanor Lisec, Matthew Mace, Margo McBrearty, Alaina McMahon, Ben McPherson, Alex Osetek, Allison Pasco, Laurel Plunkett, Leanna Restani, Dakota Sinclair, Kristen Skinner, Zachary Sova, Maddie Swan and Neel Tripathi.

Assisting in the ceremony were Chapter President Ben Dafoe, Vice President Patrick Dowdle, Secretary Lisa Kanbur and Treasurer Brandon Meyers, along with Oswego High School National Honor Society President Catherine Wells.

Fierro addressed the inductees saying, “Congratulations! This is only the beginning for you. You are leaders amongst your peers and with that leadership comes great responsibility to make well thought out decisions at all times.”

In closing, she told her students, “We will watch you with pride as you continue your career at the Oswego Middle School, Oswego High School and beyond.  Please take a moment to thank your parents, grandparents and teachers for the support and encouragement they have given you.”

Wells summed up the meaning of  being a member of the National Honor Society by saying, “As my senior year of high school draws to a close, I’ve found myself looking back on my academic career with nostalgia. I am very glad I joined the National Honor Society two years ago, as its numerous benefits have positively impacted me as a student.”

Continuing she said, “As cheesy as it sounds, being a member and later the president of the National Honor Society helped me become a better person. To the inductees, good luck with the rest of middle school, high school, and beyond.”

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Building 95

Nestle began production in Fulton more than 100 years ago and left the city for good in 2003. Building 95, the last building that Nestle built for the plant, is now being torn down. The complex, assessed at about $5 million, is owned by Phoenix resident Ed Palmer of Carbonstead LLC. Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward said that the multi-story building is being considered for student housing. Woodward also noted that several retailers have expressed interest in relocating to the site. However, at this time no developer is locked in on the property.
Nestle began production in Fulton more than 100 years ago and left the city for good in 2003. Building 95, the last building that Nestle built for the plant, is now being torn down. The complex, assessed at about $5 million, is owned by Phoenix resident Ed Palmer of Carbonstead LLC. Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward said that the multi-story building is being considered for student housing. Woodward also noted that several retailers have expressed interest in relocating to the site. However, at this time no developer is locked in on the property.

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