Mock trial program

by Thom Benedetto (via e-mail)

The 2013 Mock Trial Season is now behind us. I would like to congratulate the students from Paul V. Moore High School for winning the County Tournament. All of the teams, however, deserve congratulations.

The students worked very hard, spending countless hours learning the case, about the law, and rehearsing. They, the students and teachers/advisors alike, put their hearts and souls into this competition. It surely shows, and I have consistently received positive feedback from parents, our judges, attorneys and community members, about how well the students do every year.

It is so very rewarding to see the students perform and I am always in awe watching their excitement at the events.

It has been my distinct honor and privilege to be the coordinator of the Oswego County Mock Trial program. I am very grateful and feel blessed for the confidence placed in me. It is with regret, however, that I announce my retirement as county coordinator. I do so with much trepidation and sadness, but

I am pursuing some other challenges which will undoubtedly take me in different directions, both personally and professionally. I will take away many fond memories, however, and a strong sense of accomplishment surrounding this program.

What does this mean for mock trial? I hope it represents an opportunity for another member of our association to step forward. I will be working closely with the executive committee to identify someone to take over. It is my hope that my successor will be named by the end of this school year so that planning may begin for next year.

In closing, there are many, many people that I must thank who have been very generous with their time and assistance. In particular, the following teachers deserve recognition: Carol Blackburn (Phoenix), Jonna St. Croix (Sandy Creek), Vern Borrowman (Mexico), Sarah Jobin (Central Square), and several others.

You all work very hard, and most were involved from the very beginning, so thanks for sticking with me. It has been my distinct pleasure to work with you.

I’d also like to thank our judiciary, all of whom have been very generous with their time, year after year, after year, after year. Thanks to all of the other volunteers and supporters of this program. I truly thank you, one and all.

Emergency medical services providers to be honored

The Oswego County Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council will honor emergency medical services providers for outstanding patient care during the annual awards banquet Friday, May 10 at Bayshore, 104 Bayshore Dr., Oswego.

The awards are based on the actions of emergency medical services providers in the calendar year 2012 and will be chosen by a subcommittee of EMSAC.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to honor the professionals who serve the community as emergency medical services providers in emergency care,” said EMSAC President Norm Wallis. “Last year, 20 of these highly trained and compassionate people were honored.”

Recipients at this awards banquet will include Alexander Stevens of Oswego County Ambulance Service; Advance Life Support Provider of the Year; David N. Turverey of SOVAC and Ricky Johnson of North Shore, Basic Life Support Providers of the Year; Adam G. Howard of Fulton Fire Department, Educator of the Year; Zach Menter of Oswego County Ambulance Service,

Leadership Award; and Wayne Hall of McFee Volunteer Ambulance and Marty Spink of SOVAC, Excellence in STEMI Care.

The EMS Communications Award will be presented to Dorine Hanevy, Susan Buske, Cathy Forsythe, Angela Pietroski, and Jennifer Miller of the Oswego County E-911 Communications Center.

Cathy Barry of Oswego Hospital will receive the Registered Nurse of Excellence Award.

Oswego County Ambulance Service (Menter’s) and Oswego Fire Department will each receive two Life Saving Awards.

Menter’s providers Michelle Rockwood, Tracie DeSantis, Garrett Hauf, and Jim Webster will be honored for their efforts in one life-saving incident, while Chris Foy, Steven Sant, Dennis Shaw, Joe Susino and Brandon Brown will be honored for their work on another event.

At Oswego Fire Department, Carl Emmons, Robert Smith, Ray Abbott, and Dr. Derek Cooney will be honored for their efforts on one EMS call while Bryan Easton, Don LaBarge, William Delapp, David Engle, and William Harrington will be cited for their EMS services on another call.

There is a cost to attend the event. Business sponsorships are still available.

Anyone interested in being a sponsor may contact one of the banquet committee members or call 591-9150.

Spearing on Little Sandy Creek

Leon Archer
Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

Although it has been many years since I speared my last sucker in the cold waters of spring, I still smile thinking about the deliciously wet and frigid outings with my school days friends on Little Sandy Creek. 

The suckers would make their annual spawning run somewhere between mid-April and mid-May, and we would anxiously await them.

The run came fairly close to the end of muskrat trapping season, and sometimes I would see the newly arrived fish while running my trap line, but more often trapping would be over and my first sighting would be from the Route 11 Bridge as I looked down at the stream on my way to school.

The day I would see a school of suckers at the tail of the big pool under the bridge would also find me inattentively fidgeting during the day’s classes. I would notify my spearing buddies that I had seen the fish, making their day in classes just as long as my own had become.

We could hardly wait for school to let out so we could rush home and grab our boots and spears. Before nightfall, we would have wreaked havoc on the poor fish, noisily pursuing and stabbing at them as they fled upstream and down seeking shelter from our attack.

It was almost like a scene out of Golding’s “Lord of the Flies.”

As young boys in that setting, we were probably as much akin to blood thirsty savages as we could ever have been, but it was sheer joy of the chase that inspired us, not any dark, evil intent.

It never occurred to me, and probably not to my friends either, how cruel a fate we were visiting upon those unfortunate, terrified fish. Sometimes it is good not to think too deeply about one’s actions, which an atavistic boy can seldom be accused of doing.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Dress code

RoyHodge_WEBby Roy Hodge

My mother always enforced a fairly strict dress code. Some of the other boys in my elementary school classes wore jeans – I knew them as dungarees – to school.

My mother insisted on something “more dressy” for school, such as corduroy pants. I had “school” pants, “church” pants, and “play” pants and shirts.

T-shirts were popular – we called them polo shirts – long or short sleeves and bright stripes. We wore the nicer ones to school and played in the other ones. I don’t think we had shirts with messages on them like the ones that are popular now.

Our mother always made sure that we didn’t stay out to play after school wearing our school clothes. In a picture I have of my third or fourth grade class at McKinley School all the boys were wearing long pants and several boys were wearing polo shirts.

I was in the front row of that picture and I was wearing the kind of shirt that my cowboy movie heroes wore for dress-up occasions – button-down front, plain middle and a different color collar with the same color in a v-shaped area at the neck and shoulders.

I think my belt may have displayed ruby and diamond “gems” on the buckle. One thing my mother didn’t seem to be able to control was the “high water” length of my trousers.

I was no doubt placed in that first row because I was among the shortest of the class members. In the first row with me were two other boys and five girls.

We were all about the same height. Three of those girls, and at least two from the other rows, I considered as girlfriends during my early school years.

It must have been cooler weather – some of the boys wore flannel shirts, sweaters or long-sleeve polos. The girls all wore dresses. Short pants were popular for younger boys in warmer weather.

And that’s what they were – short pants – not short-shorts or Bermudas. It was war time and little boys wore sailor suits and other military inspired clothing.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

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Class of 2012 inducted into Oswego Athletic Hall of Fame

The Buccaneer Booster sponsored Oswego High School Athletic Hall of Fame “Class of 2012” induction ceremony was held recently. Inducted were (front row) Debbie (Miller) Lyons, Howard “Howie” McCann, Sherry (Brown) McCann, Barbara Carl (accepting for her late husband Francis Carl) and Erwin “Jeep” Dewey. Hockey representatives included Derek Carr, Mike Foley, Steve Cook, Matt Vashaw, Chris Rinoldo and Ben Miller.
The Buccaneer Booster sponsored Oswego High School Athletic Hall of Fame “Class of 2012” induction ceremony was held recently. Inducted were (front row) Debbie (Miller) Lyons, Howard “Howie” McCann, Sherry (Brown) McCann, Barbara Carl (accepting for her late husband Francis Carl) and Erwin “Jeep” Dewey. Hockey representatives included Derek Carr, Mike Foley, Steve Cook, Matt Vashaw, Chris Rinoldo and Ben Miller.

Nearly 100 Oswego High School former athletes, coaches, family members, friends and Buc sports fans were on hand for the 2012 induction of Buccaneer Booster-Oswego High School Athletic Hall of Fame.

Howard “Howie” McCann and his wife Sherry (Brown) McCann were joined by former Buc four letter athlete Deborah (Miller) Lyons, 50 year coach Erwin “Jeep” Dewey, the family of the late Francis “Fran” Carl and members of the 1995-96 and 1996-97 state runner up New York State hockey team as they were all inducted into the elite hall of honor.

The evening started with the induction of Fran Carl, who was a star in Oswego High School athletics in the late 1940s and was a standout in football and basketball.

His daughter Maureen accepted in honor of her father and thanked the committee for the honor. She also expressed that her father not only enjoyed playing sports, but was a coach and mentor of many youngsters as he continued his love of sports after leaving the scholastic arena.

Sherry “Brown” McCann was presented for induction by Hall of Fame member Helen Jermyn.  She was a standout in basketball and track throughout the four years at OHS. She received numerous league and school honors.

Howard “Howie” McCann joined his wife Sherry as the first married couple to be inducted.

He was a four year varsity baseball player and starred on the gridiron for three years. He also was the recipient of league and school honors during his time at OHS.

He was introduced by Mike McCrobie, who read a letter from former coach and Hall of Fame member Ted Kerley, who cited the outstanding leadership traits of McCann.

After high school he played baseball at Gulf Coast Community College and at Mississippi State. He had also been drafted by the Minnesota Twins.

Currently, he is the owner of McCann’s Windward Baseball Academy.

Howie said, “I would just like to thank everybody this is quite and honor for me and my wife.”

Debbie (Miller) Lyons was also inducted into the Hall of fame and was another recipient of the OHS Outstanding Female Athlete Award. She had earned over a dozen varsity letters in her four years and excelled in softball, volleyball, basketball and soccer.

Debbie noted, “This is a wonderful honor. Playing Oswego sports was awesome. I’ll always be a Buccaneer.”

Veteran coach Erwin “Jeep” Dewey has been at the helm of the track team for a half century. His dedication to football (33 years total) and track as well as to the student athletes has been monumental.

He not only was a three-sport athlete in school, but after college, returned to Oswego as a physical education teacher. He never left Oswego and has been an integral part of the program for over five decades.

He was brought to the podium for his induction after his son Kevin expressed the love and dedication his father continues to display to athletes and family.

“Jeep” thanked the late Joe Wilber for his support and noted, “It really is an awesome experience for me.”

The 1995-96 and 1996-97 state runner up varsity hockey teams were inducted together.

The two hockey teams consist of many players who contributed both years in the seasons which concluded as state runners up in the New York State Public High School Association Division I Championship Tournament.

In 1995-96 the team finished 21-3 and the following year was 21-7-1.

Members of both teams were Mark Donabella, Matt Vashaw, Mike Tucker, Mike Foley, Steve Cook, Phil Carroll, Chris Rinaldo, Ben Perlman, Chris Ackley, Greg Parr, Mark DeSantis, Travis Doty, Nate Elliott, and Kevin Jung

On the 1995-96 squad were Matt Von Esch, Brendan Coliver, Ben Miller, Pat DeBan, Josh Crannell, Erik Cole and Jeremy Knopp.

The 1996-97 team also included T.J. Barnes, Dan Farley, Chris Mathes, Derek Carr, Lou Iorizzo, Josh Molinari, Bob Haynes, Mike Fortier, Tris Gillen, Brian Gallagher.

Ben Miller accepted for the 95-96 team and Mike Foley for the 96-97 team.

Assistant Coach Mark Fierro expressed his thoughts about the two teams, as master of ceremony Bill Foley read the letter.

The players thanked their coaches, teammates and Buc Boosters.

However, Foley added, “I would like to also thank our parents as they trucked us all around the northeast and the Oswego community for all of their support from the squirt ranks up through the varsity.”

The Buc Booster Club sponsored Oswego High School Athletic Hall of Fame continues to grow with the addition of these outstanding athletes and coach. Nominations are being accepted as the “Class of 2013” is expected to be inducted in the fall or early winter.

Palermo residents form town’s first Neighborhood Watch Group

by Nicole Reitz

Residents of the Town of Palermo have started their own Neighborhood Watch Group.

The idea for the group began when resident Allison Ryder called the county and asked for a crime readout of her area.

She enlisted the help of Undersheriff Eugene Sullivan, who spoke at the group’s first meeting in April. Most of the 35 people in attendance have had their property stolen or their homes broken into.

Never in the history of the town has there been a Palermo Neighborhood Watch group. There used to be a grange in the town, but now with farmers becoming more scare, there aren’t as many communal meeting places to get to know people in the area.

The mission of the Neighborhood Watch Group is to prevent crime and to make it harder for criminals to cause trouble.

Recent crimes in Palermo range from bottles and cans being taken from pick up trucks to copper taken from pipes out of vacant houses.

In the same week, there were three separate incidents. One male resident came home after a short trip to the hardware store to find that he had been robbed in broad daylight.

A couple months ago, there was a break in on Island Road. The elderly couple was home when the incident happened. The wife was in her basement studio while her husband was working in the garage. The woman came upstairs to realize their television set missing.

Ryder said it was this incident that shook her most. If the couple had caught the criminal in the act, their lives could have been endangered.

“Some people say its just kids raising hell, but I don’t buy that, it doesn’t make it right,” said Ryder.

While the group wants to prevent crime from happening, it does not tell residents to confront criminals themselves. People should report suspicious activity to authorities if they see it or hear it.

After an incident occurs, police enforcement often question neighbors. Those that don’t report unusual activity create a missed opportunity for the force.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

lawsuitFiledCarol1

County sued over reapportionment plan

Oswego County Legislator Amy Tresidder speaks at a press conference held Tuesday at Fulton city hall. Tresidder and 10 others are suing the county over the recently passed new reapportionment plan that sharply divides some towns. Looking on is Legislator Dan Farfaglia.
Oswego County Legislator Amy Tresidder speaks at a press conference held Tuesday at Fulton city hall. Tresidder and 10 others are suing the county over the recently passed new reapportionment plan that sharply divides some towns. Looking on is Legislator Dan Farfaglia.

by Carol Thompson

Oswego County is being sued by 11 plaintiffs in the matter of the reapportionment plan passed late last year.

The plaintiffs have asked the court to nullify the plan and allow an unbiased committee redraw the legislative district lines.

The Article 78 proceeding was filed with Oswego County Court early Tuesday afternoon and a subsequent press conference was held later that day at Fulton City Hall.

The plaintiffs include the five members of the Democrat caucus and residents Al Gerisch of West Monroe. June Rivers and Sam Weber of Mexico, Gay Williams of Minetto, Ronald Greenleaf of Hannibal and former county legislator Barbara Brown of Palermo.

The non-legislative plaintiffs are from varying political affiliations.

“A few hours ago, I and 10 other plaintiffs set into motion a process we hope will eventually lead the board to declare invalid the 25 districts that were passed by the county legislature back in December,” said Legislator Dan Farfaglia.

The plaintiffs allege that towns were “intentionally and illegally split.”

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

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