Fulton Community Theatre to hold auditions for June comedy

Fulton Community Theatre will hold open auditions for its June production of “Alone Together” — a comedy about a not-so empty nest by Lawrence Roman.

Auditions will be held Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 8, 9, and 10 from 6 to 9 p.m. in the theatre’s meeting and rehearsal room at Holy Trinity Parish, 309 Buffalo St.

Those auditioning are asked to enter through the Buffalo Street school entrance and go upstairs to the top floor.

No preparation is necessary. Those auditioning will be asked to read scenes from the script.

The comedy, directed by Michael A. Bolio, explores the problem of what are parents to do when their baby birds fly back into the nest? This is the dilemma facing George and Helene Butler. Dreams of carefree days and passion-filled nights are quickly shattered when oldest son Michael, quickly followed by middle brother Elliot, return home and take up residence in the bedrooms of their youth.

Add to the mix college freshman Janie, who shows up seeking temporary lodging, and Helene and George have a real situation on their hands. The youngest son Keith was the last to leave. Will he also be the last to return?

The production will run for three weekends, June 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16. All roles for the production are open. Age range for George and Helene are 50 to 55, with the children roles ranging from late teens to 30. Character descriptions are as follows:

George Butler: Age 50-55 (or capable of playing older); a generally likeable father of three, loving husband. Always trying to be a great conciliator, wants to see everyone happy all the time, but knows in his heart of hearts he is failing miserably in every attempt.

Helene Butler: Age 45-50 (or capable of playing older); a vibrant happy woman confidant of herself and her talents, looking forward to being an empty nester. She starts to show her dark side as the story lingers on and travels the full range of emotions through the          performance.

Michael Butler: Age 25-30; oldest of the Butler children. Works as a math professor at MIT.  Appearance is generally disheveled, but Michael really doesn’t care. Both confident in his mathematical skills and afraid of failure at the same time.

Elliot Butler: Age: 21-23; the Butler’s middle son. An insufferable womanizer, who fails to see any connection between his actions and his wife throwing him out. Very much lost in himself.  Ever the huckster always seems to have a get rich quick scheme under way.

Keith Butler:  Age 18-19; the youngest to the Butler boys, seems to be the most well-adjusted of the three, and is actually looking forward to going to college.

Janie Johnson: Age 17-19; an unsuspected house guest at

the Butler Home. She seems to ooze teenage sexuality, but doesn’t seem to notice her effect on men. Janie is very confident in her little world, yet is worldlier then she lets on.

Those seeking more information, may call 598-7840 or visit www.fultoncommunitytheatre.net.

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College’s new X-ray device to probe archeological samples

Kathleen Blake of SUNY Oswego’s anthropology department displays a new low-dose device that uses X-ray fluorescence technology to analyze the elements in archeological samples.
Kathleen Blake of SUNY Oswego’s anthropology department displays a new low-dose device that uses X-ray fluorescence technology to analyze the elements in archeological samples.

Analyzing sharp-force trauma, studying ceramic artifacts disinterred after centuries, disclosing the trace elements in soils — SUNY Oswego forensic anthropologist Kathleen Blake can think of many uses for portable X-ray equipment purchased with a National Park Service grant.

The new instrument will enable faculty and student researchers to study samples in detail without liquefying, pulverizing or otherwise destroying them.

“This device is widely used in archeological and museum studies,” Blake said.

Douglas Pippin, an assistant professor of anthropology and an archeologist, received the $49,500 grant with colleagues Paul Tomascak of the earth sciences faculty and Blake.

He acknowledged that the new Bruker XRF Tracer III looks like a cross between a state police radar gun and a device for “Star Trek.”

The gun-like device came with a pump to create a vacuum, a small on-board computer for work in the field, a tripod and other attachments.

It uses X-ray fluorescence to analyze the elements and their proportions in a sample.

“This is extremely low-dose,” Pippin said. “It’s for looking closely at the surface of a sample to a depth of less than a centimeter.”

The researchers won the grant in conjunction with work the anthropology department is doing cataloging 160,000 Native American and other artifacts from archeological sites around the state.

SUNY Oswego earlier received two grants totaling $1.5 million for work under the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.

Blake, a visiting assistant professor who is on the research team for the NAGPRA project, worked in January as a visiting scientist under a fellowship with the Forensic Anthropology Unit of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York City.

Much can be learned, she said, about injuries to bones, taphonomy (changes in organisms from time of death to discovery) and other subjects that the technology can illuminate.

“This will be so helpful to student projects, too,” she said. “For example, what happens after burial of a deer’s leg? What can it tell us about the amount of copper laid down by the blade that cut the bone? What kind of blade was it?” 

Stone Soup success

by Lois Luber, Resource Development Director United Way of Greater Oswego County

I extend a heartfelt thank you to all those who lent their support to the United Way’s fourth annual Stone Soup Too Luncheon graciously hosted by Holy Trinity Parish in Fulton.

From the large amount of people who attended, to the many businesses and organizations that helped make the event possible, our Stone Soup Too Luncheon was a perfect example of the United Way’s mantra: “It’s Our Community…and It’s Personal” as the community came together to show their support for the United Way and help our area food pantries.

Our Stone Soup Luncheon would not have been possible if not for the efforts of our committee members; Catherine Trowbridge, City of Fulton; Helen Hoefer and George Timmins of Catholic Charities of Oswego County; Steve Chirello, Chirello Advertising; Karen Hubel, Blue Moon Grill; Lori Lyons and Michele Sherman of the Walmart Supercenter in Granby; Jo-Lynn Phillips and Stephanie Budd of OCO; Sue Witmer of Cayuga Community College Fulton Campus; Jan Rebeor, and our many community volunteers.

Thanks to the support we received from community members who attended, the generous donations of $500 from the Fulton Lions Club and $100 from the Fulton Sunrise Rotary, our fifth Annual Stone Soup Too Luncheon raised $1125 for food pantries in Oswego County.

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High school art show’s Viewers’ Choice Award presented

The Viewers’ Choice Award, determined by the public’s vote during the Fulton Art Association’s 2013 High School Invitational Art & Photography Show held March 2-3, was tallied at the end of the competition. The winner was Jeff Rusaw, a senior from G. Ray Bodley High School, for his 3D Metal eagle, with a 4’ wing span, entitled “Free Bird,” which also won first place in the 3D category.
The Viewers’ Choice Award, determined by the public’s vote during the Fulton Art Association’s 2013 High School Invitational Art & Photography Show held March 2-3, was tallied at the end of the competition. The winner was Jeff Rusaw, a senior from G. Ray Bodley High School, for his 3D Metal eagle, with a 4’ wing span, entitled “Free Bird,” which also won first place in the 3D category.

The Viewers’ Choice Award, determined by the public’s vote during the Fulton Art Association’s 2013 High School Invitational Art & Photography Show held Saturday and Sunday, March 2-3, was tallied at the end of the competition.

All individuals who attended the high school show were provided the opportunity to vote for their favorite art or photography entry in the show.

The winner of the Viewers’ Choice Award for 2013 receives a ribbon comparable to Best of Show and a check for $50 sponsored by Fulton Savings Bank.

The winner of the Viewers’ Choice Award for the 2013 high school show was awarded to Jeff Rusaw, a senior from G. Ray Bodley High School, for his 3D Metal eagle, with a 4’ wing span, entitled “Free Bird,” which also won 1st place in the 3D category.

The artwork with the second highest number of votes was “Disney,” a pencil drawing by Karly Hotaling, a senior at Phoenix.

Third place tally was Nikki Baker-Lanning, a junior at Fulton, for her ceramics entry, “Jack & His Hill.” Fourth place was taken by William Hollis, a Fulton senio for his computer graphic art entry entitled “Galaxy.”

Fifth place was a five-way tie:  Kayla Volkomer, an Oswego sophomore for her mixed media painting called “Birds in Winter”; Ashley Pitters, an Oswego senior for his drawing pencil entry, “CATastrophe,” which took the judges’ Best of Show Award; Jake Baker, a Fulton senior for his 3D metal entry, “Crush”; and Allie Dennison, a Hannibal junior, for her oils painting titled “Daisy.”

Florida winter

Leon Archer
Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

We have had sort of a reverse winter in Florida and, as I write this column, we are only about 10 degrees colder than Fulton. December and January were beautiful, almost steamy at times, and February was just about perfect, but March has been a really cool month.

March brought some freezes and frosts, but mostly just north of Barefoot Bay. We had one frost that did a number on my tomatoes and beans, but that was it.

On the other hand, we have had 15 nights that the temperature dipped below 40 compared to less than half that number total for December through February.

So I guess I won’t have a problem adjusting to the Fulton temperatures.

Sweet Thing and I expect that we’ll be back in our old digs before the middle of April. As much as we love getting out of the New York State winters, we always look forward to getting back home in the spring. One thing I know, the fishing has to be better than it has been down here.

The poor fishing and cold days have forced me to look for things to do other than outdoor pursuits. I have been making Sweet Thing very happy, because our Barefoot Bay residence has been getting a bit of sheet rock work done that has been hanging fire for some time and painting of every room in the house.

I have enough other updating jobs to keep me busy until we leave, so I could care less right now what the weather does, providing we don’t have a tornado.

Next season, I may start fishing fresh water instead of salt. We have great bass and crappie fishing all around us, and plenty of catfish too.

Stick Marsh, which is just west of us, has a great reputation and many fishermen come from quite a distance to fish it. I only have to drive about eight miles.

Another big area is going to be added to Stick Marsh as nearby marginal land is allowed to flood. That should become a really hot piece of fishing water in a year or two.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

Fulton City School District asked to do more with less aid

by Nicole Reitz

The Fulton Board of Education is once again asked to do more with less.

During Tuesday’s meeting, the district was looking at a $807,000 gap in the proposed $65.4 million budget.

The board was in a holding pattern as they waited for the state legislature to finish their work. Superintendent Bill Lynch said that the legislature had agreed to the framework of the budget and the budget language.

Shortly after the meeting, figures were supplied by the office of state Senator Patty Ritchie. Schools in Oswego County received increases in aid from $131,000 to $474,000 above the governor’s original proposal.

The extra aid will help fill a gap created several years ago by the state when it created the Gap Elimination Adjustment.

This year’s Gap Elimination Adjustment is smaller than in years past. State officials say they plan to phase it out as the economy recovers, but the lost revenue is a significant reason why districts are draining their reserve funds in an attempt to avoid further layoffs and program cuts.

Fulton is still looking at a $400,000 to $440,000 budget gap.

During Tuesday’s meeting, board member Brian Hotaling questioned what was the district’s “Plan B” if the state didn’t fill the gap in the budget.

Lynch said that the options left were to cut expenses, reduce spending at the schools, or borrow more from the reserve fund balance.

Lynch added that as he and other administrators put the budget together, their goal was to not use more than $1.5 million in reserves or increase the local tax levy above 1.5 percent.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

Self-defense demonstration, Q&A session to be held Monday

Off Broadway Dance Center and Noah’s Christian Nursey School are holding a self-defense demonstration and question and answer session with police officials Monday, April 1 from 6 to 8 p.m.

It will be held at the Fulton First United Methodist Church, located across from the Fulton Junior High School.

The church’s Fellowship Hall will be the site of the self defense demonstration where attendees may learn moves that could be used in many types of situations. There will also be a question and answer session with Fred Ling, a retired defensive tactics FBI instructor, and Tracie Pluff-Gioia, a retired Oswego County sheriff’s deputy.

In the church sanctuary, there will be a discussion featuring Aimee May of the Fulton Police Department and Ann Beaupre of the Syracuse Police Department.

They will talk about victimization profiling, “Warrior Mentality,” and verbal judo. Pluff-Gioia and Ling will perform some de-escalation scenarios, verbal judo, and minimal contact move demonstrations.

Both areas will be open from 6 to 8 p.m. and participants are welcome to come and stay the whole time, or drop in at their convenience. There is no need to register for this event.

The event is free, but organizers will accept donations for Noah’s Christian Nursery School and a book that will be donated to Volney School in Fulton in honor of Lori Bresnehan.

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