Schroeppel court receives grant for improvements

by Nicole Reitz

The Town of Schroeppel Justice Court has received a Justice Court Assistance Program grant for the 2012-2013 grant cycle.

The court put together a proposal and sent it into the coordinator of the JCAP program. Schroeppel was chosen in January as one of 432 New York courts who were granted the award.

Grant money was received at the end of March. The funds will be utilized to renovate and enhance the physical layout of the court, which is outdated and has some safety issues.

The grant will allow the court to purchase materials to install a jury box, witness seating and other upgrades to its interior.

In addition to these improvements, courtroom security equipment and furniture and new and up-to-date computer software will be installed.

These enhancements will increase the efficiency of operation for the court.

Court is held once a week on Wednesday evenings and the courtroom itself is used for arraignments.

The changes to the courtroom will also create a more comfortable environment.

After the work is done, there will be more space between the defendants and the bench and a secure podium.

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TalentShowWinners1

GRB holds annual Bodley’s Got Talent show

2013 Bodley’s Got Talent award winners include G. Ray Bodley High School students: Neal Burke, Audience Favorite Award for his song “I Just Can’t Wait to be King” (kneeling, left); Alex LaRock, Most Unique Award for her “Cup Song” performance (standing, third from right); Shakeemah Hordge and Erica Perwitz, Gave It Their All Award for their song “Daddy’s Little Girl” (standing, far right pair); Angela Paul and Ashley Grey captured third place for their Irish step dance (standing, second and third from left); Justin Purtell, captured second place for his guitar performance of an original song he wrote (kneeling, right); and capturing first place was Julia Fisch for her graceful, athletic and artistic original dance to “Brandenburg” by Black Violin.
2013 Bodley’s Got Talent award winners include G. Ray Bodley High School students: Neal Burke, Audience Favorite Award for his song “I Just Can’t Wait to be King” (kneeling, left); Alex LaRock, Most Unique Award for her “Cup Song” performance (standing, third from right); Shakeemah Hordge and Erica Perwitz, Gave It Their All Award for their song “Daddy’s Little Girl” (standing, far right pair); Angela Paul and Ashley Grey captured third place for their Irish step dance (standing, second and third from left); Justin Purtell, captured second place for his guitar performance of an original song (kneeling, right); and capturing first place was Julia Fisch for her graceful, athletic and artistic original dance to “Brandenburg” by Black Violin.

G. Ray Bodley High School students and staff have talent and they are not afraid to show it.

Nineteen acts took center stage in the school’s annual Bodley’s Got Talent show.

Similar to the hit television show, “America’s Got Talent,” GRB’s showcase featured a diverse blend of performances that included bands, solo musicians, dancers, martial artists, and more.

Teachers Beth Lazarek, Jennifer Reese, and Fred Kent served as judges for the showcase, presenting a first, second and third place award at the show’s conclusion.

Capturing the third place award was the Irish step dance duo of Angela Paul and Ashley Grey; honored with the second place award was guitar soloist Justin Purtell; and capturing first place was Julia Fisch who performed a graceful, athletic, and artistic dance for the audience.

In addition, the following special recognition awards were presented: Audience Favorite Award to Neal Burke for his rendition of “I Just Can’t Wait to be King;” Most Unique Act to Alex LaRock for her “Cup Song” performance; and a Gave It Their All Award to the duo of Shakeemah Hordge and Eric Perwitz for their performance of “Daddy’s Little Girl” by Frankie J.

The HOPE Club sponsored this year’s Bodley’s Got Talent, donating all proceeds from the event to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, and Hope for Ariang.

Audience members learned about these benefactors during the showcase’s intermission.

Mock trial program

by Thom Benedetto (via e-mail)

The 2013 Mock Trial Season is now behind us. I would like to congratulate the students from Paul V. Moore High School for winning the County Tournament. All of the teams, however, deserve congratulations.

The students worked very hard, spending countless hours learning the case, about the law, and rehearsing. They, the students and teachers/advisors alike, put their hearts and souls into this competition. It surely shows, and I have consistently received positive feedback from parents, our judges, attorneys and community members, about how well the students do every year.

It is so very rewarding to see the students perform and I am always in awe watching their excitement at the events.

It has been my distinct honor and privilege to be the coordinator of the Oswego County Mock Trial program. I am very grateful and feel blessed for the confidence placed in me. It is with regret, however, that I announce my retirement as county coordinator. I do so with much trepidation and sadness, but

I am pursuing some other challenges which will undoubtedly take me in different directions, both personally and professionally. I will take away many fond memories, however, and a strong sense of accomplishment surrounding this program.

What does this mean for mock trial? I hope it represents an opportunity for another member of our association to step forward. I will be working closely with the executive committee to identify someone to take over. It is my hope that my successor will be named by the end of this school year so that planning may begin for next year.

In closing, there are many, many people that I must thank who have been very generous with their time and assistance. In particular, the following teachers deserve recognition: Carol Blackburn (Phoenix), Jonna St. Croix (Sandy Creek), Vern Borrowman (Mexico), Sarah Jobin (Central Square), and several others.

You all work very hard, and most were involved from the very beginning, so thanks for sticking with me. It has been my distinct pleasure to work with you.

I’d also like to thank our judiciary, all of whom have been very generous with their time, year after year, after year, after year. Thanks to all of the other volunteers and supporters of this program. I truly thank you, one and all.

Emergency medical services providers to be honored

The Oswego County Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council will honor emergency medical services providers for outstanding patient care during the annual awards banquet Friday, May 10 at Bayshore, 104 Bayshore Dr., Oswego.

The awards are based on the actions of emergency medical services providers in the calendar year 2012 and will be chosen by a subcommittee of EMSAC.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to honor the professionals who serve the community as emergency medical services providers in emergency care,” said EMSAC President Norm Wallis. “Last year, 20 of these highly trained and compassionate people were honored.”

Recipients at this awards banquet will include Alexander Stevens of Oswego County Ambulance Service; Advance Life Support Provider of the Year; David N. Turverey of SOVAC and Ricky Johnson of North Shore, Basic Life Support Providers of the Year; Adam G. Howard of Fulton Fire Department, Educator of the Year; Zach Menter of Oswego County Ambulance Service,

Leadership Award; and Wayne Hall of McFee Volunteer Ambulance and Marty Spink of SOVAC, Excellence in STEMI Care.

The EMS Communications Award will be presented to Dorine Hanevy, Susan Buske, Cathy Forsythe, Angela Pietroski, and Jennifer Miller of the Oswego County E-911 Communications Center.

Cathy Barry of Oswego Hospital will receive the Registered Nurse of Excellence Award.

Oswego County Ambulance Service (Menter’s) and Oswego Fire Department will each receive two Life Saving Awards.

Menter’s providers Michelle Rockwood, Tracie DeSantis, Garrett Hauf, and Jim Webster will be honored for their efforts in one life-saving incident, while Chris Foy, Steven Sant, Dennis Shaw, Joe Susino and Brandon Brown will be honored for their work on another event.

At Oswego Fire Department, Carl Emmons, Robert Smith, Ray Abbott, and Dr. Derek Cooney will be honored for their efforts on one EMS call while Bryan Easton, Don LaBarge, William Delapp, David Engle, and William Harrington will be cited for their EMS services on another call.

There is a cost to attend the event. Business sponsorships are still available.

Anyone interested in being a sponsor may contact one of the banquet committee members or call 591-9150.

Spearing on Little Sandy Creek

Leon Archer
Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

Although it has been many years since I speared my last sucker in the cold waters of spring, I still smile thinking about the deliciously wet and frigid outings with my school days friends on Little Sandy Creek. 

The suckers would make their annual spawning run somewhere between mid-April and mid-May, and we would anxiously await them.

The run came fairly close to the end of muskrat trapping season, and sometimes I would see the newly arrived fish while running my trap line, but more often trapping would be over and my first sighting would be from the Route 11 Bridge as I looked down at the stream on my way to school.

The day I would see a school of suckers at the tail of the big pool under the bridge would also find me inattentively fidgeting during the day’s classes. I would notify my spearing buddies that I had seen the fish, making their day in classes just as long as my own had become.

We could hardly wait for school to let out so we could rush home and grab our boots and spears. Before nightfall, we would have wreaked havoc on the poor fish, noisily pursuing and stabbing at them as they fled upstream and down seeking shelter from our attack.

It was almost like a scene out of Golding’s “Lord of the Flies.”

As young boys in that setting, we were probably as much akin to blood thirsty savages as we could ever have been, but it was sheer joy of the chase that inspired us, not any dark, evil intent.

It never occurred to me, and probably not to my friends either, how cruel a fate we were visiting upon those unfortunate, terrified fish. Sometimes it is good not to think too deeply about one’s actions, which an atavistic boy can seldom be accused of doing.

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Dress code

RoyHodge_WEBby Roy Hodge

My mother always enforced a fairly strict dress code. Some of the other boys in my elementary school classes wore jeans – I knew them as dungarees – to school.

My mother insisted on something “more dressy” for school, such as corduroy pants. I had “school” pants, “church” pants, and “play” pants and shirts.

T-shirts were popular – we called them polo shirts – long or short sleeves and bright stripes. We wore the nicer ones to school and played in the other ones. I don’t think we had shirts with messages on them like the ones that are popular now.

Our mother always made sure that we didn’t stay out to play after school wearing our school clothes. In a picture I have of my third or fourth grade class at McKinley School all the boys were wearing long pants and several boys were wearing polo shirts.

I was in the front row of that picture and I was wearing the kind of shirt that my cowboy movie heroes wore for dress-up occasions – button-down front, plain middle and a different color collar with the same color in a v-shaped area at the neck and shoulders.

I think my belt may have displayed ruby and diamond “gems” on the buckle. One thing my mother didn’t seem to be able to control was the “high water” length of my trousers.

I was no doubt placed in that first row because I was among the shortest of the class members. In the first row with me were two other boys and five girls.

We were all about the same height. Three of those girls, and at least two from the other rows, I considered as girlfriends during my early school years.

It must have been cooler weather – some of the boys wore flannel shirts, sweaters or long-sleeve polos. The girls all wore dresses. Short pants were popular for younger boys in warmer weather.

And that’s what they were – short pants – not short-shorts or Bermudas. It was war time and little boys wore sailor suits and other military inspired clothing.

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