Lorraine Warner, retired nurse’s aide

Lorraine Warner, 71, of Oswego, died Sunday, June 23, 2013 in Oswego.

Mrs. Warner was born in Carthage, the daughter of the late Kenneth and Eunice (Ellsworth) Trumble. She was a retired nurse’s aide for Sunrise Nursing Home.

Mrs. Warner was predeceased by her husband, Daniel Warner, in 1981.

She is survived by her children, Robert Wetherwax of Texas, Scott Warner of Oswego and Daniel (Laurie) Warner of South Wales, N.Y.; her sister, Joyce Austin of Harrisville, N.Y.; and ten grandchildren.

Services and burial will be private. The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, Oswego.

Kenneth Crisafulli, local cook

Kenneth J. Crisafulli, 65, of Oswego, died Monday, June 24, 2013 at his home surrounded by his family.

He was born in Oswego, the son of the late Catino Crisafulli and Laura (Murray) Eicholzer. He was a cook at the Oswego County Public Safety Building from July 1989 until 2013, in addition he cooked for several local restaurants including the Colonial House.

He served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War and was the former local, state, and national commander for the Italian American War Veterans.

He was the current commander of the Charles Crisafulli Post #15. He enjoyed watching the Yankees, Nascar and Syracuse University Sports.

He is survived by his wife Danielle Crisafulli; children, Scott DeStevens, Katrina Crisafulli, and Danika Crisafulli; siblings, Anne (Charles) Demm, Geralyn (Gerard) Roy, Tina (Keith) Peterson, and Michael (Stephanie) Pasco; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be conducted Friday at 9 a.m. at St. Joseph Church. Burial will be private in St. Paul’s Cemetery. Calling hours will be Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, 147 W. 4th. St. Oswego.

Fulton employees’ golf tournament benefits Catholic Charities

Members of the Planning Committee for the City of Fulton Employees fourth annual golf tournament meet with at Catholic Charities to discuss details for the event. Proceeds from this year’s tournament will be used to support Catholic Charities CYO and Emergency Services programs.  From left are Catholic Charities Community Services Supervisor Helen Hoefer, Fulton City employee Tom Schimpff, Catholic Charities Executive Director Mary Margaret Pezzella-Pekow, and Fulton City employee Mark Cole.  Absent from photo are committee members Dan Davenport, Frank Veschio, Dave Perry, Mark Birkhead, and Angela Cole.
Members of the Planning Committee for the City of Fulton Employees fourth annual golf tournament meet with at Catholic Charities to discuss details for the event. Proceeds from this year’s tournament will be used to support Catholic Charities CYO and Emergency Services programs. From left are Catholic Charities Community Services Supervisor Helen Hoefer, Fulton City employee Tom Schimpff, Catholic Charities Executive Director Mary Margaret Pezzella-Pekow, and Fulton City employee Mark Cole. Absent from photo are committee members Dan Davenport, Frank Veschio, Dave Perry, Mark Birkhead, and Angela Cole.

When members of the planning committee for the City of Fulton Employees Annual Golf Tournament met to work on the details for this year’s tournament, they wanted to ensure that the proceeds would be used to help youth and families in the Fulton.

To achieve that goal, they have chosen Catholic Charities of Oswego County as the beneficiary of their fourth annual golf tournament.

A native of Fulton, committee member and Department of Sanitation employee Mark Cole said he is well aware of the services Catholic Charities offers.

Cole and his family have been longtime supporters of Catholic Charities Emergency Services program having sponsored families during the holidays and, as a boy, he spent much of his time at the CYO program.

“Many of us have ties to CYO,” said Cole. “I started attending CYO when I was 10 years old and went there everyday after school throughout my teens.  I had a lot of fun and met a lot of new friends.

“We want to make sure the money from this year’s tournament helped kids in our community and supporting CYO is the perfect way to do that,” he added.

Scheduled for Saturday, July 27, the golf tournament will be held at Emerald Crest Golf Course, Route 3 in Palermo.

Open to the public, the tournament will get underway with a shotgun start at 9 a.m.

Committee member Tom Schimpff said that this year’s tournament promises to be the best ever.

“There will be plenty of on course games, including longest drive, closest to the pin, and putting contests; plus a 50 50 drawing, door prizes, shirts for each golfer, and a complete dinner following the tournament featuring appetizers, prime rib, chicken, seafood and all the fixings from Tavern on the Lock,” said Schrimpff.

All proceeds from the tournament will be donated to Catholic Charities in support of the CYO program.

Additionally, the committee has announced that it will be doing something special for Catholic Charities Emergency Services.

“This year’s teams with the lowest score overall, lowest score mixed team, and highest score will be recognized in a special way,” said Cole. “Their entry fees will be donated in their name and used to sponsor a family during the holiday season through Catholic Charities Emergency Services program.”

A limited number of openings for teams are still available and will be filled on a first come, first served basis.

Those seeking more information or to register a team may call Tom Schimpff at 430-4899 or Mark Cole at 402-6151. 

County prepares tax fight with Entergy Nuclear

by Carol Thompson

The Oswego County Legislature passed several resolutions during Thursday’s session that involve a tax certiorari litigation with the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant owned by Entergy.

The county, Town of Scriba and Mexico Academy and Central School district have been unable to negotiate a tax agreement with Entergy following a one-year good-faith agreement that had been previously approved.

Legislators were told by those involved in the process on the county level that the new agreement would come easily.

That didn’t happen and now the parties will head to court.

The three taxing jurisdictions will retain Hacker Murphy, LLP to defend the litigation. The firm will bill the county every 30 days for their services at a rate of $285 per hour for attorney fees and a cost of $260 per hour for the senior associate and $175 per hour for the paralegal.

During the June 13 meeting, the legislature also agreed to hire George Sansoucy, PE to perform as appraisal at a cost just shy of $1 million.  The costs will be shared by the taxing jurisdictions.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Hysteria

Leon Archer
Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

I have written very little in regard to NY SAFE, Andrew Cuomo’s gun control legislation. I say Andrew Cuomo’s, because the rank and file of New Yorkers had no say nor input into its creation or passage. It was ill-advised and ill-conceived, and in spite of Cuomo’s claim that the majority of New York Residents are in favor of it, the law has been ill-received. At least 52 of the 62 counties of New York State have passed resolutions stating their opposition to the act, most asking for the law to be repealed. Sheriffs claim they will not enforce NY SAFE, and some County DA’s say they will not prosecute NY SAFE cases. That hardly indicates the rousing support the governor claimed his law has.

I went to Albany a couple weeks ago with other sportsmen on a bus chartered by the Onondaga Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs. A thousand or more people gathered outside the Capitol Building to protest the law after speaking to legislators, voicing their complaint personally. Cuomo refuses to recognize that his NY SAFE Act is very unpopular across the state. His only comment is that the law might need a little tweaking. No Governor Cuomo, this law needs to be repealed. You are not our king, you are our servant.

I don’t believe that there are very many people who were not horrified, touched and saddened by the shootings at Newtown, CT. I can’t imagine what it was like for the families affected, and I would love to find a reasonable way to prevent such a thing from ever happening again, but nothing that has been put into law or proposed for legislation would have prevented what took place or will stop a similar event from happening again.  Bad people do bad things, and bad people will always find a way to get a gun or build a bomb. Laws mean nothing to them. The threat of mortal punishment is irrelevant to them.

The first and second amendments were not put into the U.S. Constitution by our founding fathers without good reason. Bad reasoning today should not be allowed to infringe on them, but grieving people, toadying politicians, and foolish do-gooders are all too ready to give away our precious, hard won rights. The Constitution is greater and more important than all the tragedies that some people would use as an excuse to emasculate it. The day that is no longer true will be the day that all that is America will die.

Hysteria, such as followed on the heels of Newtown, has never produced anything good in our history, but it has brought about incredibly evil things, and it has stripped people of their civil rights. Remember the Japanese people on the west coast who were taken out of their homes and put into concentration camps after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor? They had done nothing wrong, they were intensely patriotic Americans, their men and their boys volunteered in record numbers for the armed forces, and they suffered horrible casualties. AND yet, to complete the shameless travesty, they were never properly compensated for the loss of property that had been seized by “loyal” Americans when they were incarcerated, all because of hysteria and all for nothing gained. It is not the only time the Constitution has been contravened, but I will let it rest at that. You get the picture.

The present demands by the hysterical for Infringing on rights guaranteed by the first and second amendments, singularly or in combination, is not being well-received by a significant segment of the nation’s population, and the perpetrators are incapable of conceiving why this is so. The great outpouring of sympathy and support the grieving people in Newtown received is now rapidly dissipating, and an undercurrent of anger and disgust is growing among citizens who can be fiercely protective of their own civil rights.

Hysteria is like a disease. It spreads and becomes an epidemic, infecting the unprotected. Strong medicine is often the only way to combat a serious, life threatening disease, and waiting too long may lead to death. The present hysteria over guns and “gun control” is producing outrageous laws, many of which will eventually end up in front of the Supreme Court unless they are repealed by cooler heads, which is likely to happen as legislators and governors who voted for them get voted out of office. That would be pretty effective medicine. Unfortunately, as so often happens, this epidemic is having its greatest effect on children and their minds, and worst of all, it’s taking place in schools where they should be safe and secure. Unfortunately the disease is being encouraged and spread by teachers and administrators.

I just want to establish that I have always had a great deal of respect for public school teachers, and the role they have played in our nation. I have always believed that overall they were a force for good in our society. But due to recent national events, my confidence in educators and our educational system has been badly eroded.

Teachers aren’t gods, and schools are not courts; they should not have the power to strip away a person’s civil rights, be he child or adult. They should not be in the business of harassing innocent children, trying to make them out to be terrorists or potential mass murderers for the most ridiculous of reasons. It is time the rest of us say enough is enough already.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Snowfall in June

RoyHodge_WEBby Roy Hodge

I was talking among a group of people recently when the topic of conversation turned to the weather — not unusual, I guess.

It was a hot day and we started with stories of hot summer weather — violent thunderstorms and summers with days on end of hot, sultry temperatures and steamy, sleepless nights.

We remembered certain storms. A couple of us recalled the time when Hurricane Hazel hit the area — that was back in the early 1950s. Unfortunately, I was one of those with a good memory.

After a few minutes, the talk inevitably turned to winter and snow. After all, at least one person in that group had lived in Fulton during the winter months of past years, and most of us had some vivid memories.

We all had memories of snow — lots of snow — of shoveling for hours and then going back to the beginning and doing it all over again, of sitting in the house while the snow piled up over the windows, of enjoying playing in deep snow, of building forts and castles of snow, and on and on.

One person thought that he remembered hearing about snow in the area long after winter was supposedly over — like in June, he thought.

Sparked by that, I remembered my father telling me about a very unusual snowfall when he was young. He was sure that it may have been in June.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

LakeGuardian1

EPA research vessel cruises Lake Ontario

Pictured is the R/V Lake Guardian docked outside of the marine museum in Oswego. This week, researchers from Clarkson University, SUNY Fredonia and SUNY Oswego conducted research on Lake Ontario, studying chemical contaminants found in the lake’s food web.
Pictured is the R/V Lake Guardian docked outside of the marine museum in Oswego. This week, researchers from Clarkson University, SUNY Fredonia and SUNY Oswego conducted research on Lake Ontario, studying chemical contaminants found in the lake’s food web.

by Nicole Reitz

The R/V Lake Guardian, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s largest Great Lakes’ research and monitoring vessel, left from the Port City Wednesday for a four-day research voyage.

A crew of researchers will collect water and sediment samples from Lake Ontario in order to study chemical contaminants found in the lake’s food web.

The purpose of the cruise is to collect water, pelagic micro-fauna, benthic invertebrates and ambient aerosol samples for organic chemical analysis.

This survey is part of a Lake Ontario assessment of organics contaminant cycling. The survey will provide dissolved and particulate phase samples as well as atmospheric concentrations.

In 2011, the EPA awarded Clarkson University a $6.5 million five-year grant to continue a partnership with SUNY Fredonia and SUNY Oswego to conduct the Great Lakes Fish Monitoring and Surveillance Program. The funding is part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The EPA has had the Lake Guardian since 1991; prior to that, it was a personnel supply vessel in the Gulf of Mexico. The ship has been modified for science research on the Great Lakes.

Operating from April to September, the Guardian has 13 full time crew members, including a chef, a stewardess, first mates, marine techs and engineers. Bob Christensen has been the captain of the Guardian since 1998.

The ship has a maximum capacity of 28 people and has sleeping quarters for those on board. With the ship in operation for 24 hours a day, at any given time, someone is sleeping before their next shift.

The Lake Guardian also has a lounge, a galley offering three meals a day, and a chemistry and biology lab. Researchers on the ship use state-of-the-art data collection techniques and instruments during the biannual spring and summer surveys.

A green lab is used to do chlorophyll analysis. The lab is also used to sort through samples, picking out the different species and freezing them so that Clarkson University can analyze the tissues.

The Lake Guardian is the only self-contained, non-polluting research ship on the Great Lakes. Operated by the EPA’s Chicago-based Great Lakes National Program Office, the ship conducts monitoring programs that sample the water, aquatic life, sediments, and air in order to assess the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Researchers can sample a chunk of the lake bottom by using sediment grabs. The grabs are capable of sampling the deepest spot of Lake Superior.

Beth Hinchey Malloy is one of the environmental research scientists on this excursion. She said that it is not uncommon for someone from the EPA office to be gone for a month at a time conducting research.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

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