Sign up now for Wednesday cover photos in The Valley News

As regular readers of The Valley News know very well, each Wednesday’s paper has a photo on the front page highlighting an event coming up in the community.

Organizations, nonprofits and other groups call us to line up this spot in the paper. Our photographer, Kelly LeVea, takes the photos ahead of time and the photos usually run one or two weeks before the event.

The Valley News has some open Wednesday papers coming up for which we have no photos scheduled. They are: Dec. 18, Dec. 26 and and Jan. 8.

We also have no one scheduled for Jan. 22.

If you have an event after but close to one of these dates, give me a call. Debbie Groom, 598-6397, ext. 31.

Follow these tips to get photographs into The Valley News

We at The Valley News love photographs.

We love photos of kids doing great work in school, people getting promotions at work, organizations conducting fundraisers for the community and people attending one of the many things to do here in Fulton and Oswego County.

I’m sure readers like opening their Valley News on Wednesdays and Saturdays to see the fabulous photos we run. Most of these great shots are taken by people just like you and then sent to me by email or snail mail.

But there are some guidelines to ensure your photos can be used in the newspaper. Here they are:

1)Do not take photos with your phone. Smartphones and iPhones take photos that are clear enough for online posting such as on Facebook or Flickr. But they do not reproduce well enough to put in the newspaper. We need photos to be at least 300 ppi (pixels per inch).

2)Try to use a digital camera. It doesn’t have to be some fancy smancy expensive camera. I have a point-and-shoot Canon PowerShot 2500. It shoots at 16 megapixels and has a 5 times zoom. Put in on the Auto mode and ANYONE –  even I – can take great photos. And the camera cost me only $89 on Amazon. Might be worth it for every organization to have one of these hanging around to take shots to submit to the newspaper.

3)Once you take that great shot, be sure to get the names of the people in the photo. Usually people are in rows, so get the names going left to right and, if there are more than one row of folks, do front row, then second row and on and on. It’s always important to remember for newspaper photos to not have too many people in the photos. We will not use photos submitted without names identifying the people in the photo.

At The Valley News, we are sensitive to issues surrounding children and photographs. Every school district I know has a policy about students being photographed for newspaper or website use. Usually, on the first day of school, a permission slip is sent home for the parent or guardian to fill out on whether the child is allowed to be in photos for the newspaper or a newspaper website.

When a person takes a photo for use in a newspaper or website, he or she can be steered clear of students who cannot have their photos taken. Then photos can be taken and names of the students can be includes for use in The Valley News.

We enjoy having photos emailed to us because it is easy for us to get them ready for publication. If someone has a hard copy photograph to put in the paper, it can be mailed to the office or dropped off and we can scan it into the computer system. That takes about two minutes and then we can return the original photo.

If anyone has any questions about how to submit a photo to The Valley News, please don’t hesitate to ask. You can reach me at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com or editor@valleynewsonline.com  Or call me at 598-6397 or stop in the office at  67 S. Second St., Fulton.

On Borrowed Time enters second weekend

The second weekend of the Oswego Players latest show, “On Borrowed Time,” directed by Richard Mosher will begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22.

There will be two other chances to catch this production – 8 p.m. Saturday Nov. 23 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24.

Paul Osborne adapted the Broadway play version from the novel by Lawrence Edward Watkin.

Joannie Anderson, who plays Marsha, is a recent graduate of SUNY Oswego, concentrating on the study of musical theatre. This is her third show with the Players, having had roles in last summer’s successful “Mame” and the Woody Allen comedy, “Don’t Drink the Water” in September.

Anderson is trained in voice as a mezzo, and has experience with jazz and modern dance. In her spare time she enjoys drawing, dancing and studying the Japanese language and culture.

She is interested in a wide array of things, including film theory, classical theatre, folklore, and sociology.

Norman Berlin, III, requires no introduction to Oswego audiences. He joined the Players in 2003 as a young lad, and has participated in nearly every production since that time in some way, shape or form.

“Normie,” as he is affectionately known, is currently a junior at SUNY Oswego, majoring in history and museum studies. His most recent on-stage roles were Sheldon Marcus in “The Best Man” and as Junior Babcock in “Mame.”

Berlin has a passion for theater and is always willing to fill in wherever needed on or back stage. He enjoys giving back to the community and plans to continue with the Oswego Players for many years to come.

Other cast members are Anne Raynor, Wayne Mosher, Peter Mahan, Matthew Oldenburg, Beverly Murtha, Jim Oldenburg, Michael Moss, Kyle Walton, Jonathan C. Altman, Troy Pepper, Zach Dumott and Tippy (Betty the Dog).

Location is the Francis Marion Brown Theatre in the Oswego Arts Center at Fort Ontario. Ticket prices are $10/adults; $8/seniors and $7/students.

Reservations are advised and can be made through the Box Office at 343.5138.  Check the Oswego Players website at www.oswegoplayers.org for additional information.

What’s happening at the CNY Arts Center

As the holidays draw near, CNY Arts Center has lots to offer.

Mark your calendars!

TH3, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21 is Happy Hour at the Gallery for you to meet the artists and shop the gallery. With more than 30 artists on exhibit there is always something new to see.

At the Arts Center in 357 State St. Methodist Church, the Drama Club will debut at 7 p.m. Nov. 22 with monologues, skits and other original work.

The Drama Club is sponsored by Shineman Foundation for seventh- and eighth-graders to study theater twice a week after school at the Arts Center. This debut is a culmination of their efforts.

Ben and the Magic Paint Brush follows at 6 p.m. Nov. 23 with one performance only presented by Kids Onstage. The play written by Bathsheba Doran is produced by special arrangement with Playscripts, Inc. www.Playscripts.com.

Both events, Drama Club Debut and Kids Onstage, are open to the public for “Pay-What-You Can” at the door. In lieu of a ticket, you can support our young thespians with your donations.

At 6 p.m. Nov. 26 is an artist meet-up at the gallery for all artists – those already exhibiting their work and those thinking about it. Artists exchange ideas, share works in progress and socialize with others. The Studio Arts tab on the CNYArtsCenter.com web site can provide details.

“Sew You Can” Christmas projects class will be offered Nov. 30.

Level One meets from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. followed by Level Two from 3 to 5 p.m. The project will be making Christmas cookie coin purses.

Students must have taken the beginners class and class will be limited to six students. All classes take place at the Arts Center at 357 State St. Methodist Church. Use the Park Street entrance.

Our Gingerbread House contest kicks off the holiday season for us. Gingerbread creations made by teams or individuals are due at the gallery between 2 and 4 p.m. Dec. 1.

Use your Thanksgiving holiday to make more than turkey. Stop by the gallery between Dec. 1 and 14 to vote for your favorite gingerbread creation. Winners will be announced Dec. 14 at our Holiday Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Arts in the Heart Gallery, 47 S. First St.

Following our open house on the evening of Dec. 14, we are planning a lovely dinner – Gifts of the Season Dinner Cabaret. This is a capital fundraising event. There will be specific details in columns to come.

From 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4 we offer a class in collage. Learn about theme and composition to create interesting pieces. This class is in our classrooms on Park Street.

On Saturday, December 7 we are offering a full day of art fun with Holiday Goodies: 9-noon; Holiday Crafts: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.; and Watercolor: 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

All classes require pre-registration. Classes and workshops charge a modest fee.

Visit www.CNYArtsCenter.com  for all the latest details and updates or call 592-3373. All classes are held in CNY Arts Center located in the lower level of State St. Methodist Church, 357 State St., Fulton unless otherwise noted.

Remember we bring all arts to all ages at two separate locations. Classes, Writer’s Café, Author Spotlight, live theatre, and Arty Camp, are held in CNY Arts Center located in the lower level of State St. Methodist Church, 357 State St., Fulton. Use the Park Street entrance.

Arts in the HeART Gallery is located at 47 S. First St. in downtown Fulton across from the gazebo for local artists who want to display their artistry. Monthly artists’ meet-ups and TH3 Happy Hour also takes place at the gallery. Artists can apply for gallery space online at www.CNYArtsCenter.com.

Poetry Corner, by Jim Farfaglia

Even with 50 years heaped upon it,

even though other memories,

other tragedies,

have since been known,

this one burns eternal:

 

The principal’s voice over the PA,

his incomprehensible news

raining down on our third grade world.

 

The classroom cut-up, trying to make a joke,

as we tried to make sense of it all,

our teacher frowning through her tears.

 

The early dismissal,

walking the streets of Fulton,

cars dragging with the weight of the news.

 

Crossing the bridge of our innocence,

the once lively river below,

now just chilling water.

 

The stream of words from our TV,

Cronkite, Brinkley—all mankind—

remembering one man, beloved  by all.

Light in the Darkness, the Rev. David Grey

“As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.  And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him;  but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem.  When the disciples James and John saw this, they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?” Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they went to another village.” Luke 9:51-54

These are the same James and John that Jesus had nicknamed  “Sons of Thunder” and here we find them asking if they should call down lightening from heaven to destroy these people for refusing to welcome the Savior.

Whatever possessed these two men to think that Jesus would want that? After all, he had long ago taught them what to do when they entered a town that refused their message.

“Whatever town or village you enter, search for some worthy person there and stay at his house until you leave.  As you enter the home, give it your greeting.  If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you.  If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, shake the dust off your feet when you leave that home or town.” (Matthew 10).

Indeed, that is precisely what Jesus did in this Samaritan village. So why might they think Jesus would want to destroy them?

The answer probably lies in the manner that rabbis taught their disciples in that day and in something else Jesus had said in the very next verse in Matthew 10.  The disciples were expected to anticipate the deeper meaning of words spoken by their rabbi. They were expected to think, question and endeavor to draw intelligent conclusions from the various teachings.

In the next verse in Matthew, after telling them to shake the dust from their feet and leave town, Jesus had said, “I tell you the truth, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town.”

I can almost hear these two Sons of Thunder trying to extrapolate what Jesus intended and saying, “By Jove, I think we’ve got it!”

We think he wants us to be instruments of judgment on this town, and so they ask the question, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?”

But instead of praise, or even a mild correction, they receive a rebuke. Ouch!  They had either  missed or completely forgotten that the Son of Man did not come to destroy but to, “to seek and to save what was lost.”   (Luke 19:10)

Pastor David M. Grey

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church

“As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.  And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him;  but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem.  When the disciples James and John saw this, they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?” Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they went to another village.” Luke 9:51-54

These are the same James and John that Jesus had nicknamed  “Sons of Thunder” and here we find them asking if they should call down lightening from heaven to destroy these people for refusing to welcome the Savior.

Whatever possessed these two men to think that Jesus would want that? After all, he had long ago taught them what to do when they entered a town that refused their message.

“Whatever town or village you enter, search for some worthy person there and stay at his house until you leave.  As you enter the home, give it your greeting.  If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you.  If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, shake the dust off your feet when you leave that home or town.” (Matthew 10).

Indeed, that is precisely what Jesus did in this Samaritan village. So why might they think Jesus would want to destroy them?

The answer probably lies in the manner that rabbis taught their disciples in that day and in something else Jesus had said in the very next verse in Matthew 10.  The disciples were expected to anticipate the deeper meaning of words spoken by their rabbi. They were expected to think, question and endeavor to draw intelligent conclusions from the various teachings.

In the next verse in Matthew, after telling them to shake the dust from their feet and leave town, Jesus had said, “I tell you the truth, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town.”

I can almost hear these two Sons of Thunder trying to extrapolate what Jesus intended and saying, “By Jove, I think we’ve got it!”

We think he wants us to be instruments of judgment on this town, and so they ask the question, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?”

But instead of praise, or even a mild correction, they receive a rebuke. Ouch!  They had either  missed or completely forgotten that the Son of Man did not come to destroy but to, “to seek and to save what was lost.”   (Luke 19:10)

Pastor David M. Grey

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church

ACE program celebrates with ziti dinner

A successful launch of the Academic and Community Enrichment program at Fairley Elementary School last year has translated into a great start for 2013-14, with a community dinner punctuating that success Nov. 14.

Eighteen first- and second-grade students who participate in the afterschool program helped make appetizers and desserts, prepare salads and create placemats for the dinner, with Canale’s providing baked ziti as the main course.

In addition to the students, their families and Canale’s, several Fairley teachers and staff members worked together to make the meal a reality.

“We have Lynn Bullard, who is our master chef,” said school psychologist Geri Seward. “She plans dinner at her church every week, so she knows how to buy in bulk and prepare in bulk. She is the queen of this dinner. She knows exactly what she’s doing.”

As teachers served nearly 75 meals to those in attendance, parents and students expressed their appreciation for the program.

“I like it, and I know they love it,” said Heather Hamrick, whose daughters Chloe and Lexus Sinko participate in ACE. “They’re eager to come to these events.”

The meal is just one of the many offerings provided through the afterschool initiative.

“We do 45 minutes of academics every day too, and then we do a project or craft. We’ve done all kinds of things. We’ve done yoga, we’ve had people come in, talk with them … a little bit of everything,” Seward said.

First-grade teacher Telia Tomayo said the program enriches the lives of students and their families and connects them with school in a positive way.

“We like to get the students and families here and involved, and this program does that,” she said.

Fairley Elementary students learn about Native American culture

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The Fairley Elementary School cafeteria was transformed into an Iroquois village Nov. 13 as fourth-grade students showcased homemade longhouses, recipe books, a lacrosse stick and other aspects of Native American culture.

As part of the curriculum, students studied Iroquois culture in the classroom and built upon that knowledge by watching a live performance from an expert on the subject.

However, learning was not confined to the school building, as students took their knowledge home and created a variety of projects, culminating with a presentation during this week’s board of education meeting.

“I think the live performance and demonstrations helped our kids connect to the Iroquois traditions and cultures,” Fairley Principal Jody Musa said. “That is evident through these projects.”

Students used everything from store-purchased goods to natural resources to items within their own homes to create their projects.

“The Iroquois did not use paint or cardboard because they did not have paint or cardboard,” fourth-grade Maria Khan said as she presented her longhouse made of tree bark.

For Musa, the presentations were a great way to wrap up the Iroquois unit and shine a spotlight on the students, their parents and teachers as well.

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