Poetry Corner, by Jim Farfaglia

Even with 50 years heaped upon it,

even though other memories,

other tragedies,

have since been known,

this one burns eternal:

 

The principal’s voice over the PA,

his incomprehensible news

raining down on our third grade world.

 

The classroom cut-up, trying to make a joke,

as we tried to make sense of it all,

our teacher frowning through her tears.

 

The early dismissal,

walking the streets of Fulton,

cars dragging with the weight of the news.

 

Crossing the bridge of our innocence,

the once lively river below,

now just chilling water.

 

The stream of words from our TV,

Cronkite, Brinkley—all mankind—

remembering one man, beloved  by all.

Light in the Darkness, the Rev. David Grey

“As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.  And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him;  but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem.  When the disciples James and John saw this, they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?” Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they went to another village.” Luke 9:51-54

These are the same James and John that Jesus had nicknamed  “Sons of Thunder” and here we find them asking if they should call down lightening from heaven to destroy these people for refusing to welcome the Savior.

Whatever possessed these two men to think that Jesus would want that? After all, he had long ago taught them what to do when they entered a town that refused their message.

“Whatever town or village you enter, search for some worthy person there and stay at his house until you leave.  As you enter the home, give it your greeting.  If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you.  If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, shake the dust off your feet when you leave that home or town.” (Matthew 10).

Indeed, that is precisely what Jesus did in this Samaritan village. So why might they think Jesus would want to destroy them?

The answer probably lies in the manner that rabbis taught their disciples in that day and in something else Jesus had said in the very next verse in Matthew 10.  The disciples were expected to anticipate the deeper meaning of words spoken by their rabbi. They were expected to think, question and endeavor to draw intelligent conclusions from the various teachings.

In the next verse in Matthew, after telling them to shake the dust from their feet and leave town, Jesus had said, “I tell you the truth, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town.”

I can almost hear these two Sons of Thunder trying to extrapolate what Jesus intended and saying, “By Jove, I think we’ve got it!”

We think he wants us to be instruments of judgment on this town, and so they ask the question, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?”

But instead of praise, or even a mild correction, they receive a rebuke. Ouch!  They had either  missed or completely forgotten that the Son of Man did not come to destroy but to, “to seek and to save what was lost.”   (Luke 19:10)

Pastor David M. Grey

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church

“As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.  And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him;  but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem.  When the disciples James and John saw this, they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?” Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they went to another village.” Luke 9:51-54

These are the same James and John that Jesus had nicknamed  “Sons of Thunder” and here we find them asking if they should call down lightening from heaven to destroy these people for refusing to welcome the Savior.

Whatever possessed these two men to think that Jesus would want that? After all, he had long ago taught them what to do when they entered a town that refused their message.

“Whatever town or village you enter, search for some worthy person there and stay at his house until you leave.  As you enter the home, give it your greeting.  If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you.  If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, shake the dust off your feet when you leave that home or town.” (Matthew 10).

Indeed, that is precisely what Jesus did in this Samaritan village. So why might they think Jesus would want to destroy them?

The answer probably lies in the manner that rabbis taught their disciples in that day and in something else Jesus had said in the very next verse in Matthew 10.  The disciples were expected to anticipate the deeper meaning of words spoken by their rabbi. They were expected to think, question and endeavor to draw intelligent conclusions from the various teachings.

In the next verse in Matthew, after telling them to shake the dust from their feet and leave town, Jesus had said, “I tell you the truth, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town.”

I can almost hear these two Sons of Thunder trying to extrapolate what Jesus intended and saying, “By Jove, I think we’ve got it!”

We think he wants us to be instruments of judgment on this town, and so they ask the question, “Lord, do you want us to call fire down from heaven to destroy them?”

But instead of praise, or even a mild correction, they receive a rebuke. Ouch!  They had either  missed or completely forgotten that the Son of Man did not come to destroy but to, “to seek and to save what was lost.”   (Luke 19:10)

Pastor David M. Grey

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church

ACE program celebrates with ziti dinner

A successful launch of the Academic and Community Enrichment program at Fairley Elementary School last year has translated into a great start for 2013-14, with a community dinner punctuating that success Nov. 14.

Eighteen first- and second-grade students who participate in the afterschool program helped make appetizers and desserts, prepare salads and create placemats for the dinner, with Canale’s providing baked ziti as the main course.

In addition to the students, their families and Canale’s, several Fairley teachers and staff members worked together to make the meal a reality.

“We have Lynn Bullard, who is our master chef,” said school psychologist Geri Seward. “She plans dinner at her church every week, so she knows how to buy in bulk and prepare in bulk. She is the queen of this dinner. She knows exactly what she’s doing.”

As teachers served nearly 75 meals to those in attendance, parents and students expressed their appreciation for the program.

“I like it, and I know they love it,” said Heather Hamrick, whose daughters Chloe and Lexus Sinko participate in ACE. “They’re eager to come to these events.”

The meal is just one of the many offerings provided through the afterschool initiative.

“We do 45 minutes of academics every day too, and then we do a project or craft. We’ve done all kinds of things. We’ve done yoga, we’ve had people come in, talk with them … a little bit of everything,” Seward said.

First-grade teacher Telia Tomayo said the program enriches the lives of students and their families and connects them with school in a positive way.

“We like to get the students and families here and involved, and this program does that,” she said.

Fairley Elementary students learn about Native American culture

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The Fairley Elementary School cafeteria was transformed into an Iroquois village Nov. 13 as fourth-grade students showcased homemade longhouses, recipe books, a lacrosse stick and other aspects of Native American culture.

As part of the curriculum, students studied Iroquois culture in the classroom and built upon that knowledge by watching a live performance from an expert on the subject.

However, learning was not confined to the school building, as students took their knowledge home and created a variety of projects, culminating with a presentation during this week’s board of education meeting.

“I think the live performance and demonstrations helped our kids connect to the Iroquois traditions and cultures,” Fairley Principal Jody Musa said. “That is evident through these projects.”

Students used everything from store-purchased goods to natural resources to items within their own homes to create their projects.

“The Iroquois did not use paint or cardboard because they did not have paint or cardboard,” fourth-grade Maria Khan said as she presented her longhouse made of tree bark.

For Musa, the presentations were a great way to wrap up the Iroquois unit and shine a spotlight on the students, their parents and teachers as well.

Hannibal school district tests communications program with parents/ guardians week of Nov. 25

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Hannibal Central School District officials have been exploring a variety of options to provide immediate communication with families when issues arise, and soon a new tool will be in place that will provide the mass communication service that the district has been seeking.

During a meeting Wednesday evening, school board members reviewed the new communication tool, Global Connect, with the district’s director of technology, Matt Dean.

Dean said the cloud-based technology allows the district to call, email or text important information to parents, staff, board members and others. It can hold up to five different contacts per person.

The system will go through several test runs before being implemented, Dean said. Test calls went out to administrators last week, and more are expected to go out to staff this week.

“The test on Friday for the 18 (members of the administrative cabinet and school board), I think it went pretty well,” he said as he played the recorded test message on his computer. “The sound clip is a .Wav file, so it can be uploaded to the district’s website as well.”

With a successful initial round of calls, the district is gearing up for the final and largest component of the communications system — the community portion — with test calls planned for parents and guardians during the week of Nov. 25.

A flier will be distributed next week for students to bring home as a reminder.

“We will be sending a message out to all the contacts currently in our system,” Superintendent Donna Fountain said. “If parents do not receive a call by Nov. 29, contact (globalconnect@hannibalcsd.org).”

Fountain said if the community test calls go well, the district could implement the new notification system in the beginning of December.

Makynzie Jade Griffith, ‘our little ladybug’

Makynzie Jade Griffith, 14-month-old daughter of Ryan Wilcox and Jamie Griffith, passed away Thursday afternoon Nov. 14 at Golisano Children’s Hospital in Syracuse.

She was born in Oswego Hospital and was known to her family as “our little ladybug.”

In addition to her parents, she is survived by a brother, Carson James Wilcox; maternal grandmother, Cathy Sabin of Fulton; paternal grandparents, Scott and Robin Hoyt and John and Robin Wilcox all of Fulton; aunts, Chrissie Griffith and Amanda Sabin both of Fulton; cousins, Alexandrea and Logan Wilcox.

Calling hours were Monday, Nov. 18 with services after the calling hours at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton.

Burial will be in Mount Adnah Cemetery.

Evan Hoffman, enjoyed hunting and fishing

Evan E. Hoffman, 42, of Fulton died Wednesday Nov. 13 at home.

He was born in Oswego, NY and Evan had remained a life resident of Fulton. He currently worked with Hubbard Farms, Granby.

Evan enjoyed hunting and fishing.

He was pre-deceased by his father Samuel Hoffman and brother Roger Hoffman.

Evan is survived by his wife of one year, Stephanie Hoffman of Fulton; daughter Christina Yanock of Fulton; stepson Francis Brockway Jr., of Fulton; two sons,  Dakota and Dylan Hoffman, both of Fulton; mother, Sonja (Kim) Becker of Fulton; maternal grandfather, Seth Loomis; three siblings, Samuel Hoffman, Ella Bonnell, and Heather Smith, all of Fulton; two step siblings, Chester Hoffman of Hannibal and Shirley Hoffman of Weedsport; and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

Funeral Services will be held at 10:45 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 23 at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. 2nd St. S. Fulton.

Burial will be held privately. Calling hours will be conducted from 9 to 10:45 a.m. Saturday Nov. 23 at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., Fulton.

C. Lorraine Fox, Lycoming Methodist Church member

C. Lorraine Fox, 85, of New Haven, died Sunday Sept. 29, 2013, at her home surrounded by family.

Daughter of the late Kenneth “Mack” Ryder and Clara MacDougal (Ryder) Stevens, she as a member of the Lycoming Methodist Church.

She was predeceased by her husband of 50 years, Ross Fox, in 1999, and her only daughter, Rosszine Piepoli, in 2005.

Surviving are grandchildren, Paul Piepoli of New Haven, Pamela (Stephan) Sovine of Florida, Angela Piepoli Lane of Syracuse; granddaughter-in-law Sally Mannise Piepoli; six great grandchildren; sisters Lillian Wallace, 90, of New Haven, Rosalind Wallace, 87, of Fulton and Violet Pringle, 84, of Fulton.

Memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 27 at the Lycoming Methodist Church. Burial will be in North Scriba Cemetery.

The family will receive friends and family at the church from noon to 1 p.m. prior to the services.

Arrangements in care of Harter Funeral Home, Mexico, NY.

“We love you Gram…the circle won’t break.”

Your hometown. Your news.