Fulton wrestling kicks off Saturday, Nov. 30

Wrestling in Fulton kicks off Saturday Nov. 30 with a dual meet pitting the Fulton Raider against the Canandaigua Braves at G. Ray Bodley High.

Battles between these two intersectional rivals over the years have been fiercely competitive. The two teams have met 13 times in the series with seven of the matches being decided by the outcome of a single bout.

“The Fulton-Canandaigua super dual is one of the highlights of the season for our program”, said Fulton’s second-year head coach Chris Stalker. “Fulton and Canandaigua have a long history of great duals and tournament competition. High school wrestling doesn’t get any better than this”, he said.

Canandaigua is led by Section V Class Finalist Vinny Romeo at 152 lbs. The Braves have four Section V Class A place-winners in their line-up: Romeo, Nate Gilligan at 132, Mitch Fisher at 170 and Daniel Dillon at 220.

Fulton is led by Section 3 Champion Mitchell Woodworth at 120, Class A Champion Brandon Hill at 132, and Joey Abelgore who placed fourth in the Section 3 Tournament at 99 pounds.

This is the first dual meet to be held on Thanksgiving weekend. The early season match-up was organized to fit Canandaigua in the schedule and give alumni and fans home for the holidays a chance to see the event.

The varsity dual is scheduled for 1:30 pm following the noon-time junior varsity dual.

Fulton wrestling shows more depth

By Rob Tetro

When talking to Fulton Junior Varsity Wrestling Coach Jeff Waldron, he suggests that the Fulton wrestling program is as strong as it’s ever been.

This season, Fulton’s varsity and junior varsity teams will have a combined 70 athletes. Waldron will coach 55 of those wrestlers on the JV squad.

But, just a few years ago, the Red Raiders lacked the depth they have this season. Three years ago, Fulton’s JV team was barely able to provide an athlete for each weight class.

Waldron’s athletes come into the season having had a very productive offseason. His team took part in clinics, wrestling tournaments and a weight lifting program. A year ago, the junior varsity team lost only one of the dual meets they participated in.

They ended the season by winning The Martin Luther King Duals in Penfield. Waldron said this event is considered one of the most challenging dual tournaments New York state has to offer.

To qualify for The Martin Luther King Duals, a team not only has to be able to fill a lineup but they must have a competitive record as well.

Recently, G. Ray Bodley High School has allowed athletes to enter the weight rooms before school to obtain the head start they need on their daily fitness. During one of last week’s early morning workouts, 28 wrestlers were in the weight room continuing their preparation for the upcoming season.

While looking at the program from top to bottom, Waldron is excited about the amount of younger wrestlers they being developed. With only 18 out of the 55 varsity and junior varsity wrestlers being juniors or seniors, Waldron looks to the future with optimism.

He feels both teams will be able to go to events this season with the mindset that they can win each one. Waldron also believes if a varsity wrestler is unable to perform, his wrestlers will be more than ready to fill the void.

“I expect that if a varsity wrestler cannot perform for any reason, such as an injury, the JV guy in his weight class can step up and do the job.”, Waldron said.

Howard Loomis, member of ‘Air Apaches’

Howard Beach Loomis, of Clymer, PA and formerly of Palermo, NY died Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013 at his home.

The son of Carlon James and Gertrude Lucille (Coventry) Loomis, he was born on July 22, 1923 in Palermo, NY.

Howard was a graduate of the Mexico Free Academy, Mexico, NY Class of 1940.

He served in the Pacific theater as a staff sergeant in the US Army Air Corps as a proud member of the 345th Bombardment (M) “The Air Apaches.” He participated in the war effort as a tail gunner and radioman on B25s.

After returning home, Howard resumed his studies in the College of Agriculture at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY and in 1950 graduated with a B.S. in Agriculture.

Howard spent his entire life working in the dairy cattle industry until his retirement at the age of 78.

His career spanned involvement with the American Dairy Cattle Club; as a county agent with the NY State Cooperative Extension Service; work with the Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA) and as a district sales manager with the American Breeders Service.

On June 29, 1946, Howard wed Harriet “Elda” (Barnum) and they shared 67 years of marriage.

He was a voracious reader with a lifelong interest in US history, especially concerning writings about the Civil War. Howard was a strong supporter of conservation and civil liberties.

Howard is survived by his wife, Elda, of Clymer, PA; his four children: Kathleen Snyder of Clymer, PA; Deanna Loomis Houck of Candor, NY; Audrey Murphy and partner Brian Black of Slippery Rock, PA and Jay Loomis and wife Connie of Collegeville, PA; nine grandchildren: Kimberly Loomis Crockard and husband, Mike: Greggory Houck; Rhiannon Orendorff and husband Josh; Nicola Caringola and husband Mike; Trisha Boyer and husband Scott; Bridget Parson; Lacey Parson; Kristen Loomis and Jaycie Loomis and seven great grandchildren: Riley Crockard; Abigail, Olivia and Emma Orendorff; Victoria Caringola and Bayleigh and Brody Boyer.

Also surviving are his brother, Lee Loomis and wife Eleanor of Fulton, NY and his sister, Gertrude Lindsley of Fulton, NY.

Howard was preceded in death by his parents; his daughter, Judy Loomis; his son-in-law, Clair Snyder; brother, Lawrence Loomis; brother-in-law, Paul Lindsley and his sister-in-law Janice Thaine and her husband, Gerald.

A private family visitation was held at the Rairigh Funeral Home, Ltd. in Hillsdale, PA. A family graveside service took place at Mount Albion Cemetery in Albion, NY with Rev. Susan Collins Thaine presiding.

The observance of military honors was accorded by the US Army Reservists.

John Fry, retired from Nestles

John A. Fry, 64, of Oswego, died Wednesday Nov. 20 at his home after a short illness.

He was born in Sandy Creek the son of the late Robert and Kathryn (Hatch) Fry. Mr. Fry lived in Fulton where he attended the Fulton School District, he then moved to Oswego where he lived for the past 21 years.

He worked in the warehouse for Nestle’s for 35 years retiring in 2002.

He was a member of the Fulton and Oswego Softball Leagues, Oswego and Fulton Men’s Bowling Leagues.

He was a strong supporter of the armed forces. Mr. Fry enjoyed watching the New York Giants, Syracuse University Sports, the Yankees, and NASCAR.

He was predeceased by his wife Irene Fry in 2002.

He is survived by his sister, Betty Woods of Solvay; his children, Constance LaDue of Fulton, Antoinette Ouellette of Scriba, Scott (Della) Daniels of Fulton, Martian (Mary) Daniels of Oswego; 13 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

Funeral services were Saturday at the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, Oswego. Burial will be in Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton.

Calling hours were Saturday at the funeral home 147 W. Fourth St., Oswego.

Palermo woman chosen to have artwork displayed in senator’s office

A budding watercolor painter from Palermo was selected to have her artwork grace the office of state Sen. Patricia Ritchie through her “Senator Patty Ritchie Celebrates Local Artists” program, an initiative organized to highlight local talent from Central and Northern New York.

Nearly two dozen artists have been featured through the program, which showcases local artists from the region with free public displays of artwork in the senator’s district offices in Oswego, Watertown and Ogdensburg.

“From painters to photographers, our region is home to so many individuals with a broad range of talents,” Ritchie said. “I’m so pleased to be able to celebrate their creativity and draw attention to those who are creating works of art right here in our backyard.”

Phyllis DiSalvo of Palermo, who began watercolor painting in 2008, has her work exhibited now in Ritchie’s office at 46 E. Bridge St., Oswego. DiSalvo continues to grow as an artist by learning new techniques using different types of media. 

SUNY Oswego offers graduation cash

ow promises students who graduate in four years a $300 return on their investment, said SUNY Oswego President Deborah F. Stanley.

Starting with the December 2013 graduating class, students who enrolled at SUNY Oswego as freshmen in the fall 2010, or subsequent fall, semester and graduate no later than May of their fourth consecutive year, and meet all other requirements of the Oswego Guarantee, will receive the $300 Oswego Graduation Return on Investment (Oswego Graduation ROI).

“We are enhancing the Guarantee we introduced over a decade ago to remind students of the value and financial benefits of earning their baccalaureate degree in four years or less,” Stanley said.

Kristi Eck, the president’s interim chief of staff, said the new Oswego Graduation ROI could provide a jump-start on job-hunting expenses or graduate school applications and help SUNY Oswego graduates transition from college into the next phase of their adult lives.

“It’s really an incentive and a gift,” Eck said. “The message behind earning the Graduation ROI is, ‘You’ve recognized the value of earning your baccalaureate degree within four years; you’ve planned wisely with your academic adviser to create a four-year degree completion roadmap; and you’ve achieved your goal of graduating on time. Now, you have a $300 gift that we hope will help you accomplish more goals in the future.”

 Unique approach

The Graduation ROI supplements the original Oswego Guarantee commitments: necessary classes will be available to complete a baccalaureate degree in four consecutive years or the college will enroll the student in the course or courses tuition-free; the college will continue to make small classes available to encourage discussion and interaction between students and faculty; and Oswego pledges to hold each student’s cost for room and meal plans constant for four consecutive years.

“Through the $300 Graduation ROI, we are emphasizing to students and their families that graduating in four years means real savings for them,” Eck said.

Mutual responsibility

The college encourages incoming students, from day one, to start working with faculty and staff on a roadmap to graduation in four academic years or less, she said. “We want to keep college a valuable, cost-effective investment for our students. Therefore, we must continue to have frequent degree-completion planning conversations with our students throughout their years at SUNY Oswego, starting with first-year student advising and continuing through senior year planning.”

To assist with advising, this year the college launched Degree Works, a software tool to help students, their advisers, and other key faculty and administrators easily focus on developing academic plans that lead to a degree.

Also,  the college works with students early in their careers to enroll in needed classes, set mandatory meetings with advisers and move steadily toward declaring a major en route to a four-year degree.

For more information, visit www.oswego.edu/guarantee.

Phoenix middle schoolers check out future careers

Middle school students at E.J. Dillon in Phoenix thought about their futures at the school’s annual Career Day.

Students were allowed to select their top five choices from a list of 40 careers. They received their schedules in homeroom outlining three sessions of their choosing that spanned a half day.

A variety of professionals, from the entertainment world to the medical field, were asked to prepare a 40-minute classroom presentation.

Several speakers were Phoenix alums, including architect Phil Squadrito, preschool teacher Lisa Balles, cosmetologist Korena Grover, F.B.I. agent Michael DuBois and firefighter Dan Dunn.

Others are current Phoenix residents; pastry chef Ann Pellegrino, “DJ Bob” O’Connell, nurse Teri Lawless and nuclear operations specialist Robert Pellegrino.

An emphasis was placed on ways in which school prepares students to be successful in any career.

Chef Pellegrino mentioned how knowing a foreign language is helpful in her line of work. Words like Tiramisu and Crème Brulee come from Italian and French. Science and math are also used in baking, from substituting an ingredient to doubling a recipe.

Pellegrino explained how there are two- and four-year programs in culinary arts.  In a competitive industry, those scooped up for jobs are often the ones with the most education and experience.

Lisa Myers from the Merry-Go-Round Playhouse encouraged students to work in a field they’re passionate about. Students in the session shared their dreams of becoming stunt and voice actors.

Myers told students if they’re interested in a theatrical career, they can begin building their special skills now. In the world of performance arts, that can mean anything from knowing how to ice skate and do a cartwheel to taking voice lessons.

Veterinarian Scarlett Springate of Highland Animal Hospital stressed the importance of education and getting good grades. To become a veterinarian, she had to obtain a bachelor’s degree before going on to vet school for another four years.

Veterinarians need to have strong communication skills, despite working with patients that can’t verbalize their symptoms. Springate often has to relay information to an animal’s owner.

Special Agent Michael DuBois is no stranger to the Phoenix Central School District. DuBois graduated in 1983, and hadn’t been back until this Career Day visit.

DuBois, who now manages F.B.I. agents, started his career as a social studies teacher, and since then has held a job as a police officer and detective. One of the most important documents he refers to daily is the Constitution, a historical document he learned of as a student.

Patrick McDougall, a sound recording engineer, emphasized in his presentation the connection between skills learned in school, and those needed to be successful in the workplace.

He urged students interested in becoming sound engineers to take music theory and technology courses in high school. Understanding the physics of audio is also important.

Great holiday gift giving at CNY Arts Center

perfect holiday gift for anyone artistic, who likes to express themselves or who just likes the arts.

During the month of December, the Center is offering gift certificates called “Artist Monthly Membership” that will provide aspiring artists their choice of a month of classes at the Center beginning in January .

“The idea of this unique gift is to give someone who wants to explore their art a little nudge,” said Alice Lamb, Program Coordinator for the Art Center.

“We hear of many people who say they’d just love to learn how to paint, write their memoir or bake delicious desserts, but don’t ever do it. This gift is a way to open that creative door for them,” Lamb said.

The gift certificate can be redeemed at the Arts Center, located at 357 State St., Fulton in the State St. Methodist Church, at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4 for the soon-to-be artists’ first two-hour session.

There they will meet Culinary Arts Instructor Diane Sokolowski, Studio Arts Instructor Kendra Matott and Writing Arts Instructor Jim Farfaglia who will provide participants with a short demo on what they will be exploring in their art genre in the coming weeks.

Students can “dabble” in each of the three genres to see which they want to take.

The remaining three sessions (all will run from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturdays) will allow students to choose the genre they want to work in — or to try all three throughout the month.

Topics will range from creating yummy appetizers to learning how to creating artwork using Photoshop to capturing your favorite school memories in a short story form.

Gift givers can purchase certificates for the month of January or for the two-month period of January and February.

Certificates are available at the CNY Arts Center or at the Arts in the HeART Gallery, located at 47 S. First St., Fulton.

For more information about this program contact the Arts Center at 592-3373 or visit their website at www.cnyartscenter.com

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