Alice G. Smith, graduate of Fulton High School

Alice  G. Smith, 87, of Merritt  Road, Granby, passed away Tuesday Dec. 17, 2013 at Oswego Hospital.

Born Feb. 12, 1926, in Phoenix, N.Y., to her late parents, Florence (Patton) and Fred I. Smith.

She was a graduate of Fulton High School. Alice was a painter for General Electric Co., Syracuse, N.Y.

Alice was predeceased by her brothers Smith, Lawrence, Tom, Sam, Fred and Charles.

Surviving are her brother, Harold Smith of Granby; two sisters, Jane Didowski, former Weedsport resident, and Freida Mason of Baldwinsville; sister-in-law, Phyllis G. Smith of Granby; several nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Services were Monday Dec. 23, with the Rev. Terrance E. Millbyer officiating in the Allanson-Glanville-Tappan Funeral Home, 431 Main St., Phoenix, N.Y.

Burial will be at a later date in Merritt Cemetery, Granby.

Hazel Yager Brown, lover of music

Hazel Yager Brown, 96, of Phoenix, passed away Friday, Dec. 20.

She was born Aug. 14, 1917, the daughter of the late Royal and Ella (Thomson) Yager.

She was a 1935 graduate of Fulton High School and worked at Nestlé Co. from 1935-39.

Hazel married her husband Howard Brown in 1937 and lived in the hamlet of Jacksonville, town of Lysander, for 63 years.

She attended the Little Utica United Methodist Church and was active with the Granby and Jordan-Elbridge Senior Citizens.

Hazel had a love of music and continued playing the organ into 2012. She enjoyed crocheting and many crafts.

Hazel was predeceased by her husband Howard in 1976, and by siblings Emma Loveland Vollendorf, Jane Hungerford, Gordon, Leonard, Adelbert, Lawrence and Robert Yager, and a granddaughter, Tania Horner.

Surviving are her children, Jeanette (John) Horner of Elbridge, Ronald Brown of Syracuse and Wendy (Joseph) Borayi Jr. of Pennellville; grandchildren, John III, Joel (Lori), Jeffrey (Tina) and Donielle Horner; step-grandchildren, Joseph (Theresa) Borayi and Felicia Weber; great grandchildren, John Wesley, Ashley and Lizzie Horner and Michael Demascole; several step-great grandchildren, great great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews and a sister-in-law, Leone Yager.

Calling hours were Friday, Dec. 27, at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton, with services following.

Burial will be at Jacksonville Cemetery in Lysander.

Memorials are encouraged to the Little Utica United Methodist Church, 9100 Prine Road, Baldwinsville, NY 13027.

Anna Mae Ladd, worked at Nestles for years

Anna Mae Ladd, 74, of Sterling, passed away at home Thursday morning, Dec. 19, following a long battle with cancer.

She was born in Fulton, a daughter to the late Merton and Helen Beshures.

Anna graduated from Hannibal High School in 1957 and worked for Nestlé in Fulton for nearly 40 years until her retirement in 2002.

She is survived by her husband of 57 years, Robert E. Ladd; three daughters, Nancy (Anthony) Ladd Toscano of Martville, Roberta Ladd of Williamstown and Cindy (Richard Hillman) Ward of Hannibal; three sisters, Carol Strauts of Oswego, Linda Walters of Florida and Elizabeth McQuaid of Fulton; three brothers, John (Cindy) Beshures of Scriba, Richard Beshures of Fulton and Jack Beshures of Fulton; nine grandchildren; 14 great grandchildren as well as several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were Dec. 23 with services following, at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St., Hannibal.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Mrs. Ladd may be made to the American Cancer Society, Memorial Processing Center, 6725 Lyons St., P.O. Box 7, East Syracuse, NY 13057.

January is Stalking Awareness Month

By Ashley M. Casey

The U.S. Department of Justice defines stalking as “a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.”

Each year, 3.4 million Americans are victims of stalking. Most of them are between the ages of 18 and 24, and 80 percent of them are female.

While often difficult to prosecute, stalking is a major crime related to domestic violence.

Oswego County Opportunities’ Services to Aid Families (SAF) program is recognizing January as Stalking Awareness Month.

SAF is providing educational events and resources on stalking, domestic violence and how to maintain a healthy relationship — or how to escape from an unhealthy one.

(See the next issue of The Valley News for the list of Stalking Awareness Month events.)

“In terms of stalking, we offer a variety of legal services,” said Sarah Stevens, who works with SAF. “We assist victims in obtaining orders of protection, compensation or updates on a criminal case.”

SAF also provides free professional training sessions for employers who want to teach their staffs about domestic violence.

Stalking behavior takes a variety of forms. A stalker may follow his or her victim near their home or workplace, call or text them repeatedly, or threaten the victim and his or her loved ones and pets.

Stalking behavior can spread online as well, through unwanted emails and social media contact, or by tracking the victim’s whereabouts through “check-in” information on sites such as Foursquare or Twitter.

“We also talk a lot about Internet safety and stalking,” Stevens said. She suggested that if you are being stalked online, “change your phone numbers and your Internet passwords.”

While not all stalkers are violent, some may escalate their harassment to property damage, physical harm or worse. More than three-quarters of women murdered by their intimate partners were stalked beforehand.

According to the National Institute of Justice, only 15 percent of stalkers were prosecuted for their crime. Of that number, only 40 percent were actually convicted of stalking.

Oswego County First Assistant District Attorney Mark Moody said statutes for stalking are more specific than what most people would consider in the broader definition of stalking.

The statute requires a pattern of behavior that is “likely to cause reasonable fear of material harm to someone’s health, safety or property.”

“There are other charges that can be brought,” Moody said. “For example, if your tires are slashed, the (perpetrator) will be charged with criminal mischief. We might not be able to show there was a repeated course of conduct.”

Moody said some victims report only one incident to the police, but never return to report additional incidents which would point to a pattern of stalking.

“If we can’t prosecute this (particular incident) because the evidence isn’t sufficient enough to make an arrest, that doesn’t mean that’s the end of the case,” Moody said. “If you have another incident, go back to the police.”

To aid law enforcement in prosecuting stalkers, victims must document the crimes as best as they can.

“A detailed journal is probably the No. 1 way if they want (the stalker) prosecuted,” Stevens said.

“You document a pattern of behavior, the course of conduct that the statute requires,” Moody said.

Both Moody and Stevens said friends and family are important in helping a victim of stalking stay safe.

“If it’s an abusive relationship that has ended or (you) are trying to end, it’s important to create a safety net around you,” Moody said.

Stevens also offered suggestions for supporting victims of stalking.

“Believe them,” Stevens said. “Don’t ask judgmental questions. Respect their privacy and don’t tell others things the victim has asked you not to tell.”

Friends can help victims develop a safety plan or seek resources as well.

“Call our hotline if (you’re) not sure what to do,” Stevens said. “Being a nonjudgmental listener is the best option.”

SAF provides shelter for those who feel too unsafe to go home, as well as free “911 phones.” Stevens said the cell phones SAF gives out are not activated with cell phone plans, but they can still dial 911 in an emergency.

For more information about OCO’s resources for domestic violence victims, visit oco.org or call the Crisis and Development Services division at 342-7532.

What do I do if I am being stalked?

If you are in immediate danger or feel that your life is being threatened, call 911. Other important numbers: OCO’s 24-hour Abuse & Assault hotline, 342-1600; Fulton City Police Department (non-emergency) 598-2111.

Obtain an order of protection and keep a copy with you.

Keep a dated journal of each stalking incident (e.g., “Dec. 30, 11 p.m.: Stalker showed up uninvited at my home” or “Jan. 2: received flowers from stalker”). Save voicemails, letters or unwanted gifts as evidence. This documentation will help if you choose to press charges against your stalker.

Inform your family, friends, neighbors and employer that you are being stalked and ask them not to share information about you if the stalker approaches them.

Be careful of what you post on social media. Your stalker may try to use information about your location and activities against you.

Valley Viewpoints

Discrepancies in Leotta documents

Recently, City of Oswego officials acknowledged the economic impact the city’s $87 million consent decree has placed on Oswego residents.

This decree stemmed from a federal and state court action, against the city, for dumping sewage into the Oswego River.

Non-compliance, with the provisions of the decree, could result in further court actions and penalties. The City Engineer is responsible for the correct implementation of this work.

With the possibility of a further increased tax burden on the residents, you would expect that a competent person of good moral character would oversee this project.

Consider this: on May 6, 1969, an Application for Examination or Employment (AFEOE), for City Engineer, was filed with the City of Oswego Civil Service Commission by Anthony A. Leotta. On the application he indicated that he was licensed as a professional engineer in New York state.

However, a state Education Department document indicated he was not licensed, in New York, until 3/20/75.

On Nov. 13, 1971, a survey map, for a parcel of land in the city of Oswego, was signed: Anthony A. Leotta, P.E. Oswego City Engineer. A complaint was filed with the state Education Department Aug. 31, 1974, concerning Leotta holding out to be a professional engineer when he was not licensed, in New York, at that time.

The rules of the Board of Regents required that “All complaints, notwithstanding their origin or the department, person or office which receives them, are to be forwarded immediately to the Executive Secretary of Professional Conduct” (Section 17.2).

This was done Sept. 16, 1974.

“In the month of December 1974 there was an investigation conducted here by the Division of Professional Conduct…”  The only discernible result was Leotta finally obtained a license in this state.

Subsequently, the state Education Department realized Leotta stated on his AFEOE he was a licensed PE in New York state. He was not.

Another investigation was launched. As part of this process the city furnished the state Education Department with a copy of Leotta’s AFEOE — this document did not indicate that he was licensed in the state of New York.

The city of Oswego had presented two different Leotta AFEOE’s, on various occasions, claiming both were correct city documents. Incredulously, the spurious application, sent to the state Education Department, was on a form that was printed in 1972 — Leotta was hired by the city in 1969.

According to a mayor’s office document dated Oct. 31, 1975: “…the investigator ruled that since the original application was returned to the Civil Service File, that there would be no warrant to prosecute regarding Mr. Leotta.”

George M. Clark

Oswego

 

Legislator thanks Meals on Wheels drivers

I just wanted to take a moment to shout out a special thank-you to the drivers involved with the Meals on Wheels program.

The recent stretch of snow that added several inches to several feet in some places is always a hardship thrown into the mix of delivery of food to the senior citizens in need of such a service.

The impassable areas, driveways and walks that have not been cleared due to health, age or disability issues become that much more of a task in this wonderful program.

Kudos to the those that show up in the accumulating snow and load up their vehicles and take off in order to make sure others are taken care of.

Thank you so very much for every inch that you tread, in order to feed others.

May you have a GREAT holiday!!!!

James Karasek

Oswego County 

Legislator

 

Recipe for change

It’s that time of year.

Yes, this time of year everyone is exchanging recipes. I have one that everyone (well, those that care)in Fulton will want.

A Recipe to save a City:

1. Everyone who receives a pay check from the city shall live inside the city limits. (Right now we have firemen that make over $100,000 a year and they don’t live in the city.) No grandfather clause, one year to comply.

2. Require the fire department to work three 8-hour shifts shifts (will require four crews of eight per shift — minimum manning of five per shift). Save on OT and comp time.

3. Require two police officers per car (saving on cars and gas)

4. Require DPW to work three shifts (with garbage collection at night). This will save OT.

5. Require two men per truck on the garbage collection — this will save the jobs for this department.

6. Put the city on a four-day work week — eight hours per day. A 32-hour work week. (For all but fire and police)

7. All but department heads should be part-time seasonal (this is new hires only)

8. Increase rental permit to $600 for three years. ($200-for 2nd unit, $100-for 3rd unit, $50-for 4th, max at 4). This will bring in an added revenue of around ¾ million dollars every three years. (Add inspectors every three years on a seasonal part-time basis)

9. Put some bite into the bark of code enforcement. (Make code violators pay a processing fee, not a fine — if not paid, add to water bill)

10. Put the highway department on three shifts also. (Hire part-time seasonal workers for snow plowing and removal) — save money on OT

11. Make all city workers (DPW-Highway-Water) same job class and pay rate — this will save money and jobs.

12. Require, I repeat, require the state pick up their fair share of retirement cost. This increased after 9/11 but that was 12 years ago

13. Request a three-year waiver of tipping fees for all garbage sent to county landfills by city of Fulton DPW trucks.(This will save the city money and therefore be able to save the DPW workers-jobs)

Now I know that in most recipes you can leave out some of the ingredients and the outcome may be almost the same. In this recipe the only things that must stay in are items #1, 2, 3, 4, 6,8,12 and 13.

I would try this recipe before I accepted any money from the State. If you add state money into the recipe you then would wind up with S.O.S.

Frank Castiglia

Fulton 

 

New Granby councilor thanks voters

My name is Eric Clothier, your new town councilman of Granby.

I would like to thank those of you who voted for me. Together we can all make a difference. I will do my best to make changes for the people, keep taxes where they should be and maintain the roads as they should be maintained.

Getting elected is only the first step. We need your help to push forward and strive for what is best for Granby. You can do this by attending the meetings and making your voices heard. Please help me in making Granby a better place to live.

Thank you.

Eric Clothier

Granby

 

Thanks for festive music

Once again, we and many members of the Fulton community enjoyed the annual Fulton Community Band Christmas Concert in the G.R. Bodley auditorium.

The music provided by the Fulton Community Band was highly entertaining and enjoyable. At some point during the concert, Fulton’s little drummer boy, Jim Myers, presented director Carol Fox with a gift from band members.

He also took the opportunity to mention how overworked he was using a variety of different instruments in playing one particular song. Carol’s response was, there was a reason why percussionists are located at the back row of the band.

During the evening’s performance a special musical arrangement was dedicated to Jack Walsh and Muriel Allerton who passed this year.

The Roamin’ Catholic Choir, led my Delores Walrath, helped put us in the Christmas mood with a number of Christmas carols. And, finishing out the evening’s concert were Mary Hamer running up and down the aisles with the Hamer sing-a-long group trying to keep up.

President of the Fulton Music Association, Steve Chirello, did his usual great job in welcoming all to the concert. Thank you to Tom Nami and Rob Lescarbeau for their technical assistance.

Bob & Sandy Weston

Fulton

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

I received a special Christmas card this year, sent to The Valley News by Bea LaClair.

I knew that Bea wouldn’t just sign her name; I was sure that she would write a few lines. And she did.

Bea, who now lives in Liverpool, wrote, “The Fulton Patriot may be out of business, but your column is still going. You still write a good story and bring back memories. I hope you will continue for a long time.”

Bea, who wrote that she is now 85, also had praise for my son, Jeff, now known as “Rev. Jeff”.

Bea must read each week’s paper very thoroughly. In a recent column I wrote that plum pudding “is composed of many dried fruits and is held together by eggs and suet, sometimes moistened by treacle or molasses.”

Bea asks, “What is treacle?” Bea, my dictionary describes treacle as “a mild mixture of molasses, corn syrup, etc. used in cooking or as a table syrup.”

I have known Bea LaClair for many years, but before I met Bea I knew her mother, Angie LaClair, who was known to everyone in Fulton as Gram, and likely is still remembered by many.

I met Gram when two of my sons and two of her great grandsons were in Cub Scouts at State Street Church in the 60s.

She was Gram to everyone, and I wrote in a column in 2006, “The neatest thing about Gram was that she was always willing to sit down at the old piano in the church basement to get the group of young boys and their parents singing.”

I continued, “Later on I got to know Gram as Angie LaClair. I was around many times when Gram would keep an old piano in this room or that hallway busy, and someone was always willing to join in on the song.”

I heard from my friend Bea after the column featuring Gram.

“I loved the column,” Bea said, “but you got one thing wrong — I forgot to tell you that our name is spelled with an a, as in LaClair, not with an e, as in LeClair.”

Bea explained, “When our family came to Canada many years ago from France our name was spelled LeClair as that is the French Canadian spelling of the name.”

Bea said when her father, Edmund, moved to the United States from Cornwall, Ontario he wanted to honor his new country by using the American spelling. “So he had his name legally changed from LeClair to LaClair,” she said.

Thanks for the card, Bea. And thanks for the memories.

‘Tis the season for cookies

An important part of the Christmas season for me and those around me through the years — wherever I have been hanging around — is making, eating and sharing with other people those wonderful morsels of holiday cheer — the cutout, decorated cookie.

For the uninitiated — if there is such a thing — that would be the flat, shortbread-y (new word) cookie of many holiday shapes, covered with colorful frosting and “sprinkles,” baked by the dozens — and eaten the same way.

We have a large jar full of cookie cutters in many, many shapes. Some of them definitely fit into the holiday scene – Christmas trees, Santa’s boot, and yes, Santa himself, along with stars, bells, angels and a gingerbread man.

Most of those shout “Merry Christmas” right back at you, but there are many other cutters of many different shapes in that jar.

When is the last time that you saw a pig in your Christmas stocking? Wait a minute — could that be in honor of Christmas dinner?

Also in the jar are a hippopotamus and an elephant. Forget about Christmas dinner for those two. There are a couple of mooses (or is it meese?)  Well, wait a minute — we could have a couple of different relatives of Santa’s reindeer here.

Mrs. Pringle’s cookies

I wrote about Mrs. Pringle’s cookies in December, 1985:

Mrs. Pringle was the mother of one of the girls who worked in my wife’s office at the telephone company in Syracuse more than 25 years ago.

My association with Mrs. Pringle during the past 26 years has been once a year during the holiday season by way of a recipe in our Christmas cookie file.

For years, I guess I never questioned the genealogy of our Christmas cookies. On Sunday, with the holiday cookie baking process getting underway at our house, I discovered the true story behind how Mrs. Pringle’s Christmas cookies made their way into our cookie jar.

I was told on Sunday that when my wife was growing up, one of the expected treats of the season were the cookies baked by her grandmother – the kind shaped like Christmas trees, Santa Claus, angels and bells.

Grandma probably inherited the recipe from her family in Germany, and turned the holiday favorites out by the hundreds every year. Grandma probably never gave a thought to the fact that the ingredients list started out with five pounds of flour and a dozen eggs.

The problem came after the new bride asked for Grandma’s recipe. No one could figure out how to turn five pounds of flour and a teacup of this and another teacup of that into just enough cookies so we wouldn’t still be eating them at Easter time.

That’s where Mrs. Pringle came to the rescue. It seems that Mrs. Pringle’s family had passed along the same prized recipe and someone along the way had translated it into cups and teaspoons.

As a tribute to the holiday season, Grandma Seils, Mrs. Pringle and the hundreds of those cookies I have eaten over the years here is the recipe:

Grandma Seils’ Christmas Cookies

3 cups flour, ½ tsp. baking powder, 1½ tsp. salt, ½ cup sugar, 1 egg, unbeaten, 2 tsp. vanilla, 1 cup margarine.

Sift flour, baking powder and salt together. Beat margarine and sugar thoroughly. Add egg and vanilla. Beat until fluffy.

Gradually stir in sifted dry ingredients until well blended. Roll small amounts of dough 1/8 inch thick.  Shape with cookie cutters.  Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes.  Ice with different colors frosting

Okay, we’re ready.  (You could let the frosting dry.) Chomp happily away … and Happy New Year.

… Roy Hodge

Porky & Buddy discusses leaving dogs out in the cold

Dear Porky & Buddy,

You recently wrote about Section 353-b of the Agriculture & Markets Law which basically requires that all dogs left outdoors have to be provided with a dog house.

I am writing to say that I personally think that law is ridiculous. I have a purebred Siberian Husky, Scarlet. She is three years old and I am here to tell you that SHE WANTS NOTHING TO DO WITH A DOG HOUSE!

She loves cold weather, the colder the better, and never ever wants to come in the house, much less a stupid dog house.

Am I really breaking the law by not having one for her?

Ken

 

Dear Ken,

In a word, yes. Quit complaining and go out and get Scarlet a dog house, or better yet, install an electronic door in your house so she can come in any time she wants.

You might be surprised what good company she is, as Huskies are notorious for adoring their humans and really should not be left alone by themselves for long periods anyway.

The bottom line is this: We love the New York dog shelter law.

Maybe you don’t think it’s necessary, but we hear of dogs that have simply frozen to death, alone on a chain with no food or water, in a blizzard.

And in the summer they die of heat stroke or dehydration.

That should not happen to dogs!

The shelter law has very specific requirements and it is easy to enforce (much easier than the anti-cruelty laws, which are very vague). It has saved a lot of dogs from a miserable life outdoors.

Furthermore, it specifically requires owners to provide shelter for their dogs that is appropriate to their breed, physical condition and the climate.

It does not require you to force Scarlet to go in the dog house, just that you have it available for her.

You love your dog, we assume. It’s not too much to ask and in a very severe storm it could save her life.

Porky & Buddy

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County. 

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego.

Call us at 207-1070 or email us at ochscontact@hotmail.com.

More from the Common Council meeting

The Common Council and the Mayor pose for one last photo in 2013. From left to right: Council President and 5th Ward Councilor Norman "Jay" Foster, Mayor Ronald L. Woodward Sr., outgoing 1st Ward Councilor Alan Emrich, 2nd Ward Councilor Dan Knopp, outgoing 4th Ward councilor Carm Cavallaro, outgoing 3rd Ward Councilor Pete Franco and 6th Ward Councilor Larry Macner.
The Common Council and the Mayor pose for one last photo in 2013. From left to right: Council President and 5th Ward Councilor Norman “Jay” Foster, Mayor Ronald L. Woodward Sr., outgoing 1st Ward Councilor Alan Emrich, 2nd Ward Councilor Dan Knopp, outgoing 4th Ward councilor Carm Cavallaro, outgoing 3rd Ward Councilor Pete Franco and 6th Ward Councilor Larry Macner.

By Ashley M. Casey

Outgoing councilors say goodbye

Three councilors acknowledged the end of their terms on the Fulton Common Council after the Dec. 26 budget hearing. First Ward Councilor Alan Emrich, Third Ward Councilor Pete Franco and Fourth Ward Councilor Carm Cavallaro thanked their fellow councilors, Mayor Ronald L. Woodward Sr. and the public in their statements.

“I think we were a very, very strong team,” Cavallaro said. The new Fourth Ward councilor will be James R. Myers.

Franco addressed the difficulties of creating the 2014 budget in his statement.

“It’s been a contentious year for the budget,” Franco said. He added that the Fulton Public Library could have lost $100,000, but the council brought the cut down to $50,000.

Franco thanked his constituents and said that longtime former Third Ward Councilor Bob Weston had encouraged him to run in the first place. Ryan M. Raponi will succeed Franco as Third Ward councilor.

Emrich said that he made each of his votes on the Common Council “for what I feel is in the city’s best interest,” including his dissenting vote on the budget. Emrich will be succeeded by Tom Kenyon.

The mayor thanked the three outgoing councilors and extended his best wishes for their futures.

“Carm, Alan and Pete: I’ve enjoyed working with you the past two years,” Woodward said. “You came in at the hardest time for the city of Fulton.”

 

Ethics committee tweaked

One member of the city ethics committee, announced at the Dec. 4 meeting, has stepped down.

Charles Marks will be replaced by Jhoram Dilk, who will serve until Dec. 3, 2016. Woodward explained that Marks gave up his position on the committee so he could be appointed to the fire and police commission instead.

Franco inquired about training for the ethics board members. Woodward said the city would ask the state about training opportunities.

 

FHA position created

In preparation for its transition from public to private, the Fulton Housing Authority sought the Common Council’s approval of the creation of the position of deputy executive director.

“This position will help us facilitate the transition from public housing to private,” said FHA secretary David Fontecchio. “(It) will remain a permanent position after the transition.”

The transition is expected to take three years and will cost $25 million. New York state has pledged $6 million, and an investor has pledged $19 million. The FHA receives no money from the city of Fulton.

 

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