Fulton varsity hockey looking for first win

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton varsity hockey team is 0-4-1 after its first five games of the season.

Rome Free Academy cruised past Fulton 6-1 in the Dec. 2 season opener.

On Dec. 4, the Red Raiders played Fayetteville-Manlius to a 3-3 tie. Oswego topped Fulton 6-2 on Dec. 6.

The Baldwinsville Bees held off Fulton 3-2 Dec. 7 while West Genesee rolled past Fulton 7-1 on Dec. 10.

In the RFA game, Rome Free Academy got off to a quick start building a 2-0 lead during the first period. RFA added to its lead during the second period with 2  more goals to take a 4-0 lead.

Fulton was able to get onto the scoreboard during the third period, but was unable to cut into RFA’s lead.

Leading the way for Fulton was Ryan Ross with one goal. Brandon Ladd and Landon VanAlstine combined to save 30 shots for the Red Raiders.

Fulton skated a competition first period in the game again Fayetteville-Manlius  and were tied 1-1 after the first.

The game proved to be equally as competitive during the second period. Again, both teams scored a goal each as the game was tied at 2 headed into the third period.

Each team scored a goal down the stretch as the game concluded in a 3-3 tie.

Fulton was led by Seth DeLisle with a goal and an assist. Following DeLisle were Matt Billion and Nick Meyer with a goal each. Ryan Ross added 2 assists. Landon VanAlstine saved 21 shots in the net for the Red Raiders.

Fulton lost to county rival Oswego in the opening game of The Baldwinsville Tournament. After a competitive first period, the Red Raiders trailed Oswego, 1-0.

Fulton kept it interesting during the second period as well. Both teams scored 2 goals each while Oswego maintained a slim, 3-2 lead. But, Oswego pulled away during the third period, scoring 3 unanswered goals down the stretch to cap off the win.

Leading the way for Oswego was Bentley Brosch with 2 goals and an assist, followed by Zach Zerrahan with a goal and 3 assists. Jacob Oleyourryk had a goal and an assist. Noah Lee and Brandon Tracz chipped in a goal each. Sean Mooney is credited with 3 assists. Roy Donovan saved 14 shots for Oswego.

Fulton was led by Cameron Clark and Austin Vashaw with a goal each against Oswego. Spencer Evans saved 39 shots for The Red Raiders.

Fulton lost a close one to Baldwinsville  in the second game of The Baldwinsville Tournament.  After a hard fought first period, Baldwinsville had a 1-0 lead over the Red Raiders.

Baldwinsville added to its lead over Fulton during the second period, outscoring Fulton by a goal to take a 3-1 lead.

Fulton made things interesting during the third period, cutting Baldwinsville’s lead to 3-2 down the stretch. But Fulton was unable to get any closer as the Bees held on for the 1-goal win.

Leading the way for Fulton were Kris Grow and Bryce Knight with a goal each. Following were Austin Forte, Trae Sheldon and Ross Ryan who combined for 3 assists. Spencer Evans saved 29 shots in net.

West Genesee got off to a solid start in its game versus Fulton when the Wildcats jumped out to an early 4-0 lead.

West Genny added to its lead during the second period, outscoring the Red Raiders by a goal to take a 6-1 lead. West Genesee scored a goal during the third period to cap off a 7-1 win over Fulton.

The Red Raiders were led by Bryce Knight with a goal assisted by Nick Meyer. Spencer Evans and Landon VanAlstine combined to save  31 shots for Fulton.

News in brief

Bishop’s Common enriched Living Residence is Oswego is having a holiday open house from 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 15.

The event is free and open to the public.

“The Holiday Open House will welcome back everyone’s favorite entertainer, Phil Markert for another great musical performance,” said Karen Murray, executive director. “Phil’s energy and enthusiasm through an interactive musical performance is a perfect way to celebrate our holiday season.”

Tours will be available throughout the afternoon. Bishop’s Commons is located at 4 Burkle St. on the St. Luke healthcare campus in the City of Oswego.

For directions or more information about the Holiday Open House, call 349-0799, or visit Bishop’s Commons on the web at bcommons.com.

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The Oswego-Fulton Episcopal-Lutheran Faith Partnerships invites the community to a special Blue Christmas service at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18 at Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, 120 W. Fifth St., Oswego.

A time for refreshments and friendship follows.

The Rev. Richard K. Klafehn  said “this very beautiful and interactive worship service is a special opportunity for those who are feeling blue, that is struggling, grieving, or hurting, and for others who care for them.”

He said lights are lit in the darkness and  participants may wrap the Christ child in bands of swaddling cloth on which they have written their hurts, losses, pains, or anguish.

“In the holiday season so many people appear so happy with great expectations, but others do not feel the cheer,” Klafehn said. “Because of the loss of relationships, job, or health, grieving the recent or impending death of loved ones, or being in the midst of a crisis, they are struggling and feel even sadder, hurting, lonely, and left out. Christmas season can be exceptionally hard, because they have to hide their hurt. This is an opportunity to be honest about these feelings, to come together, and to share the gentle comfort and promise of Christmas.”

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During the month of December, members of Prince of Peace Church are collecting money to buy animals for hungry people around the globe.

They do so by filling up small, colorful cardboard barns with loose change.

Baby chicks, for example, will grow and provide eggs to eat and sell. Sheep will produce wool to make clothes, while a goat, which costs only $50, “can provide nutritious fresh milk that can be used to make products like yogurt and cheese to sell at the market.”

This mission, called “God’s Global Barnyard” is part of Evangelical Lutheran Church of America’s World Hunger Relief effort.

Those participating in God’s Global Barnyard at Prince of Peace are invited to write on a little piece of paper what animal they’d like their donation to go toward and place it in their individual barn.

The barns are retuned on Christmas Eve and placed under the Christmas tree. Last year, more than $800 was sent to Evangelical Lutheran Church of America to help fight hunger around the globe.

Prince of Peace Church is located just outside Fulton, on the corner of Gillespie Road and Route 176 North (the Whitaker Road).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Fulton residents killed in Palermo crash

UPDATE:

The two people killed in the car  crash in Palermo earlier Thursday have been identified.

They are: Zachary Parker, 21, and Jennifer Burdick, 20, both of Fulton.

A 1998 Buick operated by 20 year old Cory Porter of Fulton was northbound on State Route 3 at about 8 a.m. Porter lost control of the vehicle and drove into the path of a southbound 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer operated by Terri Wills of Scriba.

Parker and Burdick were passengers in the Porter car. Porter was taken to University Hospital in Syracuse for treatment.  Wills was treated at the scene and released.

Oswego County budget approved

The Oswego County Legislature adopted the 2014 county budget Thursday night by a vote of 17 to 8.

Three Republican legislators joined the five Democrats in voting against the spending plan. Those voting ‘no’ were Michael Kunzwiler, Amy Tresidder and Jacob Mulcahey, Democrats from Oswego; Douglas Malone, D-Oswego Town; Daniel Farfaglia, D-Fulton; Margaret Kastler, R-Lacona; Shawn Doyle, R-Pulaski; and Daniel Chalifoux, R-Minetto.

The legislature approved amendments totaling about $177,000 before adopting the final budget. The final budget totals about $197 million.

The tax levy — the amount to be raised by taxes — increased $17,894 with the amendments. The tax rate will be $7.19 per $1,000 of assessed value, compared to $7.10 per $1,000 in 2013.

Legislators also approved a pilot project brought to them by District Attorney Gregory Oakes to spend $26,000 to hire an outside lawyer to handle all of the county’s appeals of felony convictions. Currently, one of the assistant district attorneys in the county DA’s office handles the appeals. Oakes said if this lawyer instead spends all her time on prosecuting felony cases in county court, cases will be able to move through the system at a quicker pace, alleviating the amount of time defendants are spending in the county jail.

Oakes said this could lead to fewer people in the county jail at any one time. Sheriff Reuel Todd has had problems for the last three years with overcrowding and has had to send inmates to other jails at a huge expense to Oswego County.

2 dead in Palermo car crash

Two people have died in a two-car crash on State Route 3 in Palermo, the Oswego County Sheriff’s office said Thursday.

The crash occurred at about 8 a.m. today, Dec. 12. Deputies said a 1998 Buick occupied by three people was northbound on Route 3. The operator lost control of the vehicle and drove into the path of a southbound 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer. The collision caused the deaths of two passengers of the Buick and injury to the operator.

The driver of the Chevrolet was treated and released at the scene. The driver of the Buick was transported to University Hospital in Syracuse for treatment. Names of all involved being held pending notifications of the families.

Members of teh state police, Palermo Fire Department, Mexico Fire Department and McFee and Menter ambulances assisted at the scene. The investigation is continuing.

Public hearing Thursday Dec. 12 on proposed 2014 county budget

By Debra J. Groom

A public hearing on the 2014 Oswego County budget is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday in Oswego.

The proposed 2014 spending plan $196.8 million. The tax levy — the amount to be raised by taxes — is $42.6 million, the same as in 2013.

This means most people in the county would pay about 9 cents more per $1,000 of assessed valuation in 2014.

For a house assessed at $70,000, that would be an additional $6.30 for the year.

The rate would be $7.19 per $1,000, compared to $7.10 per $1,000 in 2013.

The county Legislature’s Personnel and Finance committee approved the budget Dec. 3.

No one on the committee made any comments or suggestions for changes in the budget or cuts that could be made during that meeting.

After the public hearing, the full Legislature can  make cuts or additions to the budget. The Legislature may vote to adopt the budget thta night.

The budget portion of the meeting is at 7 p.m. in the legislative chambers in the county office building.

Earlier in the day, at 2 p.m., the legislature will have the first part of its regular monthly meeting and will tackle other issues such as:

1) Vote on whether to ban the state of New York from using the county seal, name or letterhead for any purpose associated with the SAFE Act.

The SAFE Act was enacted in January to strengthen gun laws in the state by requiring universal background checks to buy guns and increasing penalties for people using illegal guns. According to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the law “imposes the toughest assault weapons ban in the country.”

The law has been unpopular in many parts of the state, including Oswego County.

Many lawful gun owners, including sportsmen and hunters, believe the law infringes on their rights to own guns.

Oswego County Clerk Michael Backus said he voted in November for a resolution banning the state from using county seals in his SAFE Act promotions.

“I voted for, and the (state) Clerks Association unanimously passed, a resolution opposed to the use of county seals regarding the SAFE Act,” Backus said.

“Quite honestly, it’s another example of how flawed this law is that the governor shoved through the legislature,” Backus said. “It was advertised to have no financial impact on counties and that has been proven to be false.”

Part of the law allows a list of a county’s gunowners names to be released to the public unless the gunowners fill out a form opting out.

This is costing counties money — namely about $26,144 in Oswego County, Backus said.

“That figure covers shifting staff time to cover pistol permits, additional staff hours, and increased supply costs,” Backus said. “Those numbers correlate with a 60 percent increase in pistol permit transactions as compared with 2012. Background checks alone are up over 112 percent.

“As you can see, the SAFE Act most certain has a local cost that was not anticpated and has been largely dismissed by the governor,” Backus said.

A television report recently stated some counties are trying to get the state to reimburse them for these costs.

Reports in other media say the state wants to use county seals in letters to pistol permit holders concerning the permit recertificaion process.

But counties have nothing to do with recertification — the new law has turned this duty over to the State Police.

2) Vote on a resolution to impose a dog quarantine in the county through April so dogs do not run loose and harass or attack deer in the wild.

3) Vote on contracts with two firms dealing with collecting appraisal information used in the tax certiorari court proceeding with Entergy for the James FitzPatrick Nuclear Plant.

The two firms are George Sansoucy LLC and Cost Plus Consulting LLC.

Dead waterfowl found along Oswego County’s Lake Ontario shoreline

Type E botulism has again struck the eastern basin of Lake Ontario this fall resulting in sizeable mortality in migrating waterbirds.

Reports from the public and field investigations by DEC crews indicate at least 200-300 common loons have washed ashore along northern Oswego County and Jefferson County shorelines.

The loon deaths were all attributable to type E botulism. Long-tailed ducks, grebes and gulls also have been found.

A mortality event involving this many loons has not been seen on Lake Ontario since 2006.

Type E botulism is caused by a bacterial toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum, a widespread bacterium in the sediments of the Great Lakes.

Certain environmental conditions cause this strain of Clostridium to produce a toxin that can spread through the food web of the lakes. First documented in waterbirds from Lake Michigan in the 1960s, type E botulism was recorded irregularly for three decades in the lower Great Lakes.

Since the late 1990s, however, type E botulism in birds has become an annual event in one or more of the Great Lakes resulting in very large kills in some years.

Two non-native species, round gobies and quagga mussels, appear to play a key role in this change of pattern. Botulinum toxin, generated in the vicinity of mussel beds, possibly in rotting mats of algae, is picked up by the filter-feeding mussels.

The mussels are the preferred food of the round goby, a small bottom-dwelling fish that is very sensitive to the toxin.  Intoxicated gobies in turn become easy prey for diving waterbirds, such as loons, grebes, and some duck species.

The remains of gobies are the most common component in the stomach contents found in botulism-killed diving birds. Since the emergence of this new disease system, thousands of birds have perished annually.

To date in 2013, all known botulism mortality in diving birds in New York has been confined to the eastern basin of Lake Ontario.

Bird carcasses did not wash ashore until late October, the majority arriving in the last two weeks. In past years, mortality events have not occurred much later than the third week of November therefore DEC biologists do not anticipate much additional mortality, although carcasses may continue to wash ashore for a while longer.

The public is encouraged to report dead birds to the regional DEC offices.  Carcasses contain small amounts of toxin and pose some threat to animals that feed on them.

DEC has removed carcasses from portions of state-owned shoreline. Shoreline residents are encouraged to bury carcasses if feasible.

To report dead birds found in Jefferson County, contact the DEC at 785-2263; to report birds found in Oswego or Cayuga counties, contact the DEC at (607) 753-3095, extension 247.

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