Donald A. Dashnau Jr., archer and builder

Donald A. Dashnau, Jr., 55, of Oswego, passed away Wednesday Jan. 1.

He was a life resident of Oswego. Don was a pipefitter, welder, carpenter and roofer before working at Huhtamaki for several years.

He was an avid hunter, spent a lot of time in his archery workshop and was a member of Deerslayers Bowman’s Association in Oswego.

Don was very proud of his daughters and grandchildren — when he was down they always brought his spirit up.

He was predeceased by his grandparents, William T. and Luella M. Donaldson.

Don is survived by his daughters, Donielle Dashnau  and Courtney Dashnau both of Fulton; his companion, Mary Meeker of Fulton; his mother, Lora Mae Martin of Eustis, Fl.; his father, Donald A. Dashnau, Sr., of Oswego; a brother, Jerry Himes of Eustis, Fl.; a cousin, Jack Lewis, who was like a brother to Don; an aunt, Jean Lewis; uncle and aunt, Robert and Patricia Coe all of Oswego; and three grandchildren, Boston Dashnau, Carson and Louella Chetney.

Calling hours were Monday at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton. Graveside services will be in the spring at Mount Adnah Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Mr. Dashnau may be made to the Pentecostals of Fulton, (Pastor David Bassette), 100 Cayuga St., Fulton, NY 13069.

Awards presented by supermodified group

A number of awards were presented in November at the International SuperModified Association Awards Banquet.

Receiving awards were:

Drivers Point Fund sponsors — Carol D. Haynes, Debbie Lane, Howie Lane,  Brad Lichty and Kathy Harrington.

ISMA Owner and Driver of the Year  — Vic Miller and Lou Cicconi.

Owners Champion — Vic Miller

Drivers Champion — Lou Cicconi

The Shea Concrete ISMA Super Series Steel Palace point fund to the top five point getters —  Ben Seitz, Mark Sammut, Vic Miller, accepting for Chris Perley, Lou Cicconi and Mike Lichty.

2013 ISMA Locke Crane Services Mechanic of the Year — Ryan Klingelhofer of the Lichty-Reed team.

2013 ISMA Randy Witkum Memorial Rookie of the Year — Alison Cumens

2013 Slice n Go Deli ISMA Most Improved Driver honors — Alison Cumens.

2013 ISMA Support Award — Carol D. Haynes

2013 Gater Racing News Fans Choice Driver Award — Mike Lichty

2013 ISMA Achievement Award — Alison Cumens.

2013 Race Threads ISMA Crew of the Year — Lichty-Reed race team

2013 ISMA Lois Matczak Memorial Award — Delores Murphy

2013 ISMA Jim Soule Dedication award — Presented posthumously to Jack Murphy, past president, head tech person and long time supporter of ISMA.  2013 Jim Shampine Memorial Award — Ed Shea

Shineman grant funds MASH Camps

The Central New York Area Health Education Center was awarded a $20,000 grant from the Richard S. Shineman Foundation to support its Medical Academy of Science and Health (MASH) Camps.

Through the MASH Camps, middle and high school students have a chance to learn about various health professions by participating in interactive and hands-on activities that highlight job duties.

Students attend one of nine camps offered in collaboration with hospitals and nursing homes located throughout Central New York.

“MASH Camps provide an exciting experiential entrée for our local students to explore and initiate pursuit of a healthcare career. This is an effective process for ‘growing our own’ healthcare providers,” said Richard K. Merchant, health education center chief executive officer.

“By virtue of this donation, the Shineman Foundation has demonstrated the importance of investing in our youth to ensure the well-being of our communities into the future,” he said.

“As a chemist, (Dr. Shineman) was particularly passionate about encouraging students to love the sciences,” said Lauren Pistell, executive director of the Foundation.

The Central New York Area Health Education Center is a nonprofit health workforce development organization serving a 14-county region..

Established in 2001, its mission is to improve access to quality health care by promoting improvements in the supply, training, development and distribution of health care professionals.

In 2002, the education center offered its first health careers exploration camp. The number of camps has grown from 2 in 2002 to 19 in 2013.

Locally, Oswego Hospital hosts a MASH Camp.

Taekwondo America in Oswego hosts Black Belt testing

Oswego’s Taekwondo America recently hosted the 2013 Winter Black Belt Test at the Oswego Middle School.

Heading up the testing board were Rochester’s Master Sung C. Kim and Watertown’s Master Blaine Harding.

Rounding out the testing board were a number of visiting senior Black Belts from the Taekwondo sister schools: Grand Master Kim’s Penfield school, Abbott’s Oh-Do Kwon Taekwondo in Mexico, and from Watertown, Sunset Taekwondo and Weist’s Taekwondo Training Center.

Every six months, Black Belts from the Central and Northern New York Taekwondo schools gather and are provided the opportunity to further their advancement and training as Black Belts.

Once a student obtains his or her Black Belt, continued advancement as a Black Belt is accomplished by “Tip Testing”; each Black Belt student tests their skills and knowledge of the Taekwondo curriculum and in turn earns a corresponding “colored tip” (a colored band affixed to a student’s belt indicating their level of achievement).

The colored bands, in order, are yellow, green, blue, red and brown. A black belt student “Tip Tests” every six months, and after three years, and six “Tip Tests” later, a student is eligible to “Dan Test.”

Fifth Dan is considered “Master” level.

In order to be eligible to test for First Degree Black (First Dan), a student must study and train for a minimum of three years and demonstrate a proficiency in and knowledge of several Poomses (or forms), and numerous self defense, sparring and board breaking techniques.

To be eligible to test for Second or Third Degree Black Belt, a student must continue to study and train for a minimum of three years at each Dan, and demonstrate an even higher level of proficiency in skill and also demonstrate additional knowledge of the philosophy and history of Taekwondo.

At the recent Black Belt Test in Oswego, Taekwondo America’s Brandon Beshures and Cody Vincent tested for their First Degree Black Belt and assistant instructors Desiree Muller and Paul Esdan, Jr. tested for their Second Degree Black Belt.

New First Dans

Brandon Beshures, 11, is a sixth-grader at Fitzhugh Park Elementary School. Brandon is the son of Theresa Gibson and Eric Beshures and he has a brother, Eric, and a sister, Chelsea; his grandparents are Rhea Beshures and John and Marcella Gibson.

Brandon has been studying Taekwondo for 2 ½ years and he says his Taekwondo experience has been fun, and it also involved hard work, but it was all worth it.

Cody Vincent,12, is a sixth-grader and has five brothers and sisters. Cody says he started his Taekwondo experience in 2010 and his family has supported his efforts.

He says it was his mother who pushed for him to enter tournaments and to “find his limits.”

Cody says he has met some really great people during his Taekwondo experience and Taekwondo means a lot to him because it has taught him about perseverance, integrity, self control, respect and spirit and has helped him be a good example to his younger siblings

New Second Dans

Desiree Mullen, 14, is the daughter of Cherie and Dan Mullen. Desiree is a ninth-grader at Mexico High School where she is also a varsity swimmer on the Oswego Laker Swim Club — this year she earned the Rookie of the Year Award.

Desiree says she has been a Taekwondo student for more than four years and is an assistant instructor at Taekwondo America. Mullen says she has made many friends throughout her Taekwondo career and her friends and family have helped her reach the level she is at today.

While training for her 2nd Dan, she says she’s realized just how hard she’s worked to reach her goal and finds her accomplishment an amazing and very rewarding experience.

Paul Esden, Jr., is a freshman at SUNY Oswego and is the son of Michelle and Paul Esden, Sr.; his sister Kali also has a Black Belt in Taekwondo.

Esden says he began his Taekwondo training in 2008, and really didn’t know how far his training would take him. He said he was going to try the best he could to get his 2nd degree black belt and the experience has been was “way beyond (his) wildest dreams.”

Esden thanks Master and Mrs. Pryor for all their work and support, because “without them, I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing today”!

Taekwondo training places a strong emphasis on respect, personal development and achievement, both physically and emotionally. Both adults and children immediately benefit from the structure and energy Taekwondo offers, challenging each and every student to be their best and always demonstrate respect towards others.

Taekwondo America students train under Grand Master Sam Kim and Master Sung C. Kim of Rochester.

For more information, call Leo Pryor, head instructor at Taekwondo America, 135 E. Bridge St., Oswego 342-2470. Visit our website www.oswegotkdamerica.com.

Chicken processing company opens in former Birds Eye plant

By Ashley M. Casey

Pakistan-based poultry processing company K&N’s Foods USA, LLC, has settled into the former Birds Eye Foods plant.

The company kicked off its new residence in Fulton with an inauguration ceremony Jan. 3. The plant, which Birds Eye vacated in December 2011, is located at 607 Phillips St.

The new plant is expected to add 183 jobs to the city over a course of three years. Although production will not begin for another two months or so, K&N’s  already has employed 44 people in Fulton, 35 percent of whom are former Birds Eye employees.

K&N’s will receive about $1 million in Excelsior tax credits from New York state in exchange for its promise to create jobs.

“It is much better as an elected official to come to an opening than a closing,” Assemblyman Will Barclay, R-Pulaski, said at the inauguration ceremony. “It’s great to have K&N’s step into that vacancy.

Founded in 1964, K&N’s processes halal chicken products such as chicken nuggets, patties and kebabs. “Halal” is an Arabic term that refers to food prepared under  Muslim dietary standards, which prohibit pork and alcohol and require certain methods of slaughtering an animal for meat.

K&N’s Foods is a popular brand in the global halal trade — which generates $700 billion annually — but the Fulton plant will be the company’s first step in entering the North American market.

“There’s a huge Muslim population here (in the U.S.),” said Khalil Sattar, founder and chairman of K&N’s Foods. “There is literally no halal exports from the U.S.”

Sattar said the company has “explored” some market options and are close to hiring a salesperson.

After reviewing several possible sites, including one in Buffalo, K&N’s decided on Fulton because of its proximity to Canada and available facilities.

But it was the Oswego County Industrial Development Agency (IDA) that solidified the decision.

It was a matter of “who would be more willing, ready and responsive” to K&N’s needs, Sattar said. He credited L. Michael Treadwell, CEO of IDA, as the “game-changer” in the decision.

“We were seriously looking in Buffalo, but things started changing when Mike entered the picture,” Sattar said.

Production at the Fulton plant is still about two months away, pending approval of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Sattar said the USDA has already visited the plant once, and the packaging is already prepared for the first batch of products.

“If we succeed, it means economic development (for Fulton),” Khalil Sattar said.

Maroun Elementary students receive dictionaries

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Third-grade students at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School have another resource to bolster their knowledge and vocabulary, thanks to a donation from the Fulton Sunrise Rotary Club.

On Dec. 20, Rotarians Ellen Nowyj and LaVerne DeLand brought 124 dictionaries for each third-grader at the school.

The resource books, complete with a periodic table, maps, a list of presidents, a plethora of words and other information, were funded through three Rotary Club fundraisers.

Nowyj said the dictionary initiative is a great way to get students using physical resource books rather than immediately going to the Internet and searching for information that may not always be reliable.

“All the information is right there for you,” Nowyj said. “You don’t have to go to the computer. It has everything from charts to metric system tables.”

In addition to the dictionary distribution, the Rotarians also discussed the importance of their organization.

“Our motto is service above self,” Nowyj said. “That’s something we really take to heart.”

That message wasn’t lost on the students, as the children asked questions about community involvement and discussed ways that people make a difference.

Birdlebough inducts 25 in National Honor Society

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

More than two dozen John C. Birdlebough High  students were celebrated Dec. 17 as their service, scholarship, leadership and character were recognized with induction into the National Honor Society.

“An honor such as this is a wonderful way for the school and community to recognize and celebrate the choices and sometimes the sacrifices you have made,” said Adviser Angela Neiss.

The 25 inductees joined 33 current honor society  members who celebrate scholarly achievement and service to the community.

Neiss said members help organize blood drives, serve Thanksgiving dinner to the less fortunate, participate in an Earth Day community cleanup and volunteer for a variety of activities.

It is this kind of service that keynote speaker Joanna Young, JCB’s instrumental teacher, cited as a critical component of National Honor Society membership.

“Students have concerned themselves with the welfare and well-being of their fellow classmates and society as a whole,” Young said. “Their actions as leaders will be models for others to follow.”

The inductees took the Honor Society pledge and Superintendent Judy Belfield presented each with a pin signifying their membership.

New members are: Kellen Arnold, MacKenzie Berube, Alexis Bowering, Marisa Dona, Mike Doran, Chris Fisk, Nicole Fitzgerald, Matti Gleason, Sarah Hoag, Jordan Jock, Jessica Jones, Meghan Lees, Chris Nicolella, Meghan Rowe, Michael Sadoski, Jonathan Schmidt, Austin Scruton, Andrew Smith, Morgan Stobart, Zack VanGorder, Abby Venskus, Derick White, Caroline Woodside, Ryan Wranesh and Jolene Zaia

BBB alerts donors about local nonprofit charity

The Better Business Bureau is alerting donors about a Central New York  charity, Camp Fire USA Central New York Camp Talooli – currently F rated – that has had its tax-exempt status revoked.

This means anyone donating to the nonprofit would not be able to use that donation as a tax deduction on his or her income taxes, said BBB spokeswoman Peggy Penders.

The BBB said while the tax exempt status was revoked, Camp Fire and Camp Talooli still is operating as a charity and soliciting gifts from the public.

She said the Internal Revenue Service revoked the organization’s 501(c)(3) IRS tax exempt status in February 2013 for failing to file its 990 forms for three years. A 990 is a nonprofit’s equivalent to a 1040 tax form.

The BBB states the revocation was not contested and was posted to the public in May.

Camp Talooli is located near Pennellville in the town of Schroeppel.

Since the Camp Talooli revocation posting date in May, any donations made were no longer tax-deductible. The BBB said in a release that Camp Talooli advertised donations would be tax exempt.

The Camp Fire and Camp Talooli website this week states: “Currently we are updating/resolving some filing inconsistencies that are required to regain/retain this status (tax-exempt) for 2014 and beyond. If you have any questions in this regard please do not hesitate to contact me (Executive Director Jan Peneston) at 934 4051.

BBB officials say not all charities operate the same and encourage donors to do their research and verify current tax-exempt status before they give.

Camp Talooli officials have not responded to BBB requests for information.

Peneston said Monday the organization has submitted one of the three 990s to the IRS and it is waiting to hear what the  next step is to obtain tax-exempt status again.

She said Camp Fire also has hired a new accounting firm and should have all 990s filed by the end of January.

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