Oswego Children’s Theater sets auditions for teen play

The Oswego Children’s Theater will host auditions for an upcoming teen theater production from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday Jan. 12 and Monday Jan. 13.

The auditions will be held at the home of the Mosher Family located at 151 E. Seneca St., Oswego.

The auditions for the production are open to any area youth who will be at least 13 years of age on or before April 12, 2014 on up to the age of 19

Lyndsie Lee Jones will direct the production. The show will be presented locally and will also be performed April 12 at the Michael J. Harms Theater Festival, in Auburn.

The Michael J. Harms Theater Festival is an annual event that features performances from area high school aged groups. The performances are judged by a panel of judges.

The judges award individual and group commendations. The festival also features workshops where each participant is given the chance to work on various theater projects.

Those auditioning for the production may bring along a monologue and will be asked to read from a script.

For more information, call 342-5265 or 529-1009.

SUNY Oswego, Chinese college OK agreement to expand international study

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego and a well-known communications university in Beijing recently signed an agreement that could send as many as 20 Chinese students a year to Oswego to complete their undergraduate degrees in broadcasting and mass communications, journalism and public relations.

While students from Communication University of China will apply to come here for degree completion, the door also is open for SUNY Oswego students to study at the university known as “a cradle of China’s radio and television talents.”

Lorrie Clemo, provost and vice president for academic affairs; Fritz Messere, dean of the School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and Joshua McKeown, director of international education and programs, signed the memorandum of understanding during a November visit to China.

“The CUC agreement is an important part of our overall strategy to become more internationally connected and to develop partnerships that offer reciprocal benefits for students and faculty across institutions,” Clemo said.

“We are purposefully seeking university partners like CUC that are inviting to international students and are able to offer more international research opportunities to our faculty,” she said.

Agreements in Asia

The five-year renewable pact with CUC represents the latest in a growing number of links with universities in Asia, particularly in Korea and China, as well as a new exchange agreement in India.

Oswego’s chemistry program has a degree-completion agreement with Zhejiang Gongshang University in Hangzhou.

Another pact offers students of Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, also in Hangzhou, and Oswego the opportunity to complete degrees at each others’ institutions in business administration, human resource management and marketing.

A similar agreement with Nanjing University of Science and Technology also exists.

“Through CUC and our other Asian university partners, Oswego students and faculty will have deeper engagement with issues in a part of the world that is currently the most populated and dynamic in shaping the global environment that we all share,” Clemo said.

As many as 50 Chinese students a year attend SUNY Oswego among the more than 200 international students, McKeown said, and their focus largely has been in business and the sciences.

“We have so many academic strengths in other areas, we consciously have sought out other types of programs for articulations,” he said.

This spring, two exchange students from CUC will enroll in Oswego for a semester in communications disciplines, preceding the first round of degree-completion candidates later in 2014.

Messere and McKeown said the college hopes to expand the agreement with CUC to include more opportunities for each other’s students.

“This (articulation) agreement will facilitate the transfer of high-quality students — the best communications students China has to offer — to come to SUNY Oswego to complete their degrees,” McKeown said.

“This agreement has the potential to open up a wealth of opportunities for their students and ours,” McKeown said.

Messere agreed, noting CUC also has programs in graphic design and music.

“I’m hopeful this is the beginning of a number of relationships,” Messere said. “I would like to see relationships such as this one extended throughout the School of Communication, Media and the Arts.”

Exploring potential

McKeown said an attractive option in the future for Oswego students could be completing a master’s degree in international communications at CUC.

It is a one-year program whose courses are taught in English.

Messere is excited about the possibilities of the new relationship. For example, the school is exploring a two-week course in New York City to enable Chinese students to meet and talk with business executives in communications industries headquartered there.

Top students also will have a chance to participate in the Hollywood P.O.V. program that visits the entertainment capital, he said.

“We would invite qualified Chinese students to join the Hollywood program, just as we invite qualified American students who have the necessary interests in large-budget entertainment and film,” Messere said.

Alfred Pyzdrowski, ‘master carpenter’

Alfred A. Pyzdrowski, 93, of Fulton, died Thursday evening Jan. 2.

He was born in Syracuse Nov. 30, 1920; and graduated from Central Square High School in 1938.

Mr. Pyzdrowski was a resident of Fulton for most of his life and he enjoyed winters in Florida since his retirement in 1982 from the Oswego Hospital as a boiler technician.

He was a member of the Carpenters local of Syracuse where he worked for Terry Heights Corp., as a master carpenter and cabinet maker for over 25 years. He was a self-employed contractor and builder of new homes in the Fulton area.

Mr. Pyzdrowski was both an accomplished builder for many years and a faithful Jehovah’s Witness since childhood, he helped establish the first Kingdom Hall in Fulton – Oswego area.

He will always be remembered as one who gave freely to the needs of others.

Mr. Pyzdrowski was predeceased by his wife of 69 years Barbara, and their daughter Peggy Ann O’Brien.

He is survived by his son Stephen John Pyzdrowski of Florida; two grandsons Curtis O’Brien of Volney, Cordell O’Brien of Baldwinsville; and triplet great grandsons.

He is also survived by his brothers Julian (Lois) Pyzdrowski of Central Square, Stanley Pyzdrowski of Baldwinsville, his sister Jenny Ryan of Fulton.

Funeral services were Tuesday at the Fulton Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses, where his nephew David Ryan will conduct the services. Calling hours were Sunday at the Sugar Funeral Home 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

Spring burial will be in Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton.

Carol Bixby Belanger, Fulton resident

Carol Bixby Belanger, 63, of Fulton, passed away Dec. 31 at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester.

She is survived by her children, Charles, John, Brandi and Rebecca Belanger and Kathi Runyon; her mother, Eileen Bixby; siblings, Thomas, Charles, James, John and Steven Bixby and Eileen Huwe; two grandchildren; many nieces and nephews.

There are no calling hours or services.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are requested to be made to the American Cancer Society, 6725 Lyons St., POB 7, East Syracuse, NY 13057.

Foster Funeral Home in Fulton has care of arrangements.

James Edward Healy, worked at Sealright for 40 years

James Edward Healy, Sr., beloved husband and devoted father, passed away Wednesday Jan. 1 after a brief illness at St. Joseph’s Hospital.

James was born Aug. 25, 1937 in Fulton, a son to the late, Betty Van Buren. He graduated from Mexico High School and in 1959 married Ellen Maher.

James worked at Sealright for 40 years, retiring in 1996.

He enjoyed camping, fishing, tying flies and spending time with his family and friends.

James is survived by his beloved wife of 54 years, Ellen V. Healy of Fulton; two daughters, Sherry (Richard) Martuza of Arkansas and Terry Healy of Fulton; one son, James (Mary) Healy of Baldwinsville; a sister, Patricia Hines of Fulton; seven grandchildren, Jennifer (Chris) Kent of Fulton, Jamie Demars of Florida, Kristy Phillips of Boston, Alicia Healy of Baldwinsville, Keith Healy of Fulton, Jessica and Josh Martuza of Arkansas; as well as four great grandchildren.

Calling hours were Sunday Jan. 5 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton.

Contributions in memory of Mr. Healy may be made to the American Cancer Society, Memorial Processing Center, 6725 Lyons St., P.O. Box 7, East Syracuse, NY 13057.

Donald A. Dashnau Jr., archer and builder

Donald A. Dashnau, Jr., 55, of Oswego, passed away Wednesday Jan. 1.

He was a life resident of Oswego. Don was a pipefitter, welder, carpenter and roofer before working at Huhtamaki for several years.

He was an avid hunter, spent a lot of time in his archery workshop and was a member of Deerslayers Bowman’s Association in Oswego.

Don was very proud of his daughters and grandchildren — when he was down they always brought his spirit up.

He was predeceased by his grandparents, William T. and Luella M. Donaldson.

Don is survived by his daughters, Donielle Dashnau  and Courtney Dashnau both of Fulton; his companion, Mary Meeker of Fulton; his mother, Lora Mae Martin of Eustis, Fl.; his father, Donald A. Dashnau, Sr., of Oswego; a brother, Jerry Himes of Eustis, Fl.; a cousin, Jack Lewis, who was like a brother to Don; an aunt, Jean Lewis; uncle and aunt, Robert and Patricia Coe all of Oswego; and three grandchildren, Boston Dashnau, Carson and Louella Chetney.

Calling hours were Monday at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton. Graveside services will be in the spring at Mount Adnah Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Mr. Dashnau may be made to the Pentecostals of Fulton, (Pastor David Bassette), 100 Cayuga St., Fulton, NY 13069.

Awards presented by supermodified group

A number of awards were presented in November at the International SuperModified Association Awards Banquet.

Receiving awards were:

Drivers Point Fund sponsors — Carol D. Haynes, Debbie Lane, Howie Lane,  Brad Lichty and Kathy Harrington.

ISMA Owner and Driver of the Year  — Vic Miller and Lou Cicconi.

Owners Champion — Vic Miller

Drivers Champion — Lou Cicconi

The Shea Concrete ISMA Super Series Steel Palace point fund to the top five point getters –  Ben Seitz, Mark Sammut, Vic Miller, accepting for Chris Perley, Lou Cicconi and Mike Lichty.

2013 ISMA Locke Crane Services Mechanic of the Year — Ryan Klingelhofer of the Lichty-Reed team.

2013 ISMA Randy Witkum Memorial Rookie of the Year — Alison Cumens

2013 Slice n Go Deli ISMA Most Improved Driver honors — Alison Cumens.

2013 ISMA Support Award — Carol D. Haynes

2013 Gater Racing News Fans Choice Driver Award — Mike Lichty

2013 ISMA Achievement Award — Alison Cumens.

2013 Race Threads ISMA Crew of the Year — Lichty-Reed race team

2013 ISMA Lois Matczak Memorial Award — Delores Murphy

2013 ISMA Jim Soule Dedication award — Presented posthumously to Jack Murphy, past president, head tech person and long time supporter of ISMA.  2013 Jim Shampine Memorial Award — Ed Shea

Shineman grant funds MASH Camps

The Central New York Area Health Education Center was awarded a $20,000 grant from the Richard S. Shineman Foundation to support its Medical Academy of Science and Health (MASH) Camps.

Through the MASH Camps, middle and high school students have a chance to learn about various health professions by participating in interactive and hands-on activities that highlight job duties.

Students attend one of nine camps offered in collaboration with hospitals and nursing homes located throughout Central New York.

“MASH Camps provide an exciting experiential entrée for our local students to explore and initiate pursuit of a healthcare career. This is an effective process for ‘growing our own’ healthcare providers,” said Richard K. Merchant, health education center chief executive officer.

“By virtue of this donation, the Shineman Foundation has demonstrated the importance of investing in our youth to ensure the well-being of our communities into the future,” he said.

“As a chemist, (Dr. Shineman) was particularly passionate about encouraging students to love the sciences,” said Lauren Pistell, executive director of the Foundation.

The Central New York Area Health Education Center is a nonprofit health workforce development organization serving a 14-county region..

Established in 2001, its mission is to improve access to quality health care by promoting improvements in the supply, training, development and distribution of health care professionals.

In 2002, the education center offered its first health careers exploration camp. The number of camps has grown from 2 in 2002 to 19 in 2013.

Locally, Oswego Hospital hosts a MASH Camp.

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