Oswego couple are “Petal Pushers” at Rose Parade

By Ashley M. Casey

More than a decade ago, when Hannibal High School music teacher Shirley Terrinoni worked in the Mexico School District, she added an item to her “bucket list”: decorate a float for the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, Calif., on New Year’s Day.

Shirley’s inspiration was her then-coworker, history teacher and travel writer Sandra Scott, who had volunteered with the Petal Pushers to decorate the massive, flower-covered floats.

Since then, it had been a dream of Shirley’s to do the same.

“She’s always wanted to go there. She filled out the online application. When we got accepted, she was pretty excited. I heard her scream,” said Shirley’s husband, marketing strategist Jim Terrinoni.

“I was very excited because I didn’t think they would take everyone (who applied),” Shirley said. But with thousands of volunteers and several floats to decorate, the Petal Pushers will take all the help they can get.

“We’ve done volunteering for about five years,” Jim said. For the Race Across America (RAAM) transcontinental bicycle race, the Terrinonis would travel to Parkersburg, W.Va., to operate a time station from 2003 to 2008.

Once the route changed and different volunteers were involved, they stopped going.

“It was some of the same people, but it wasn’t that core group,” Jim said.

After years of California dreaming, the Terrinonis, who live in Oswego, finally made their trip to Pasadena a reality.

They made the cross-country trek and stayed in Pasadena for a week before New Year’s to help the Petal Pushers.

The Petal Pushers are made up of 4,000 volunteers, ranging from ages 13 to 96, who gather to decorate seven floats for the Rose Parade.

The most famous of these floats is the one sponsored by Lutheran Hour Ministries in St. Louis, Mo. It is the only Christian float in the Rose Parade.

This year’s theme was “Dreams Come True,” and depicted a church with a grove of trees.

Jim recalled Petal Pushers coordinator Dick Gast joking, “I realize for some of you that putting a single rose on the Lutheran float would be like going to Mecca.”

The Terrinonis were two of the lucky few assigned to work on the LHM float, though they worked on others as well.

Shirley also worked on the “closer” float, or the parade’s final float, which was a giant football covered in palm bark.

“We were fortunate that we ended up on a float that most people wanted to be on,” Jim said.

They were assigned the 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. shift. In some cases, the following evening shift worked through the night to get the floats finished.

“You wouldn’t think that it would happen, but every night when you leave and you know how much has been done, and there’s a second shift that comes in, in the morning you’re truly amazed at what was accomplished. Each person doing a small amount adds up quickly,” Shirley said.

Every surface on the float needed to be covered in flowers, seeds or other plant material.

“I’ve watched the Tournament of Roses Parade many times, and I know that they always tell you that everything has to be covered,” Shirley said. “But until you’re there, you don’t truly realize they mean everything from the trailer hitches to the grates that are over the engine exhaust outlets … All of those have to be covered one line at a time in seeds. Every space has to be done.”

“The judges go through it with a fine-toothed comb to make sure there wasn’t anything that wasn’t covered — not even a half-inch space,” Jim said. “Sometimes, you can’t even look at it because it’s so overwhelming.”

Despite the week of hard work, Jim said that working on the floats was “an enormous amount of fun” and the float designers’ “creativity is mind-boggling.”

“I witnessed the total experience. I’m glad I was there from the beginning when there wasn’t anything on the float to when it was totally finished,” Shirley said of their weeklong stay. “I think if I’d only been there one day, I wouldn’t have gotten the whole experience.”

Some of the families the Terrinonis met had been Petal Pushers for more than a decade.

“I would recommend it to anybody,” he said. “It is definitely a family affair. Outside of Disney, I have never seen … such a diverse population.”

“I would truly love to do it again,” said Shirley, “if I have the chance.”

Would Jim do it again?

“I’m open to thinking about it because it was a good experience. The people were so friendly,” Jim said. “We’ve traveled and done a lot of things, but never anything like this.”

Valley Viewpoints

Offers thanks

My name is Peter Holmes, and as of Jan. 1,  I am once again a fire commissioner for First Fire District in Granby.

I need to thank the voters of the First Fire District. The turnout and support that I received from you is humbling and I assure you not taken lightly.

The responsibility of a fire commissioner is to be a steward of your tax dollars and weigh the wants of the Fire District against the needs of the Fire District.

I have ideas of how to keep the tax levy manageable and how to plan for the future. I wish to share these ideas with you (the public) at our public meetings, the second Wednesday of every month at the Granby fire house at 7 p.m.

Again, thank you. And don’t hesitate to ask questions of your government!

Peter Holmes

Granby

Second Amendment teaching

Who knows better what the  Second Amendment means than the Founding Fathers?

One of our Founding Fathers said, and I quote: “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes….laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants;  they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.’’

– Thomas Jefferson  (quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria )

Do any of the school children know any other quotes from  the Second Amendment from our Founding Fathers?

Myron Pringle

Oswego

Jerry’s Journal

Let’s first begin with Bob Borek, a former Fultonian, who called me from his home in Meteraire, a suburb of New Orleans, La., to share some special memories.

Bob’s been away from Fulton for 20 years, but reads my column, and the one that particularly caught his eye was on the old pavilion at Recreation Park.

He said his father, Boley Borek, worked there in the 1940s, was a member of the park commission for about 10 years, and worked with John “Muskie” Muscalino, who he remembers as walking with a limp.

Muskie was city recreation commissioner as well as a physical education teacher and coach at Good Old Fulton High School.

“Do you remember the PLAV championship baseball team? It was sponsored by the Polish Legion of American Veterans when it was still on Broadway,” Bob said.

“The PLAV was state champions for years. Bubba Tracy, Don Smith, Stan Smith, and Jerry Allen were on the team,” he said.

He reminisced a little more and chuckled about setting pins at Fedora’s bowling alley as a kid but, “by the end of pay day he had no money because he spent it all at the snack bar!”

I thanked Bob for the nice phone call and said I actually knew his dad, not personally, but as the step-father of my good friend Doris Kenyon Taylor.

So, just before I wrote this I called Doris to sort things out. She said Bob’s mother and her father died young. George Kenyon was only in his 50s, and her mother, Frances, worked at the Woolen Mill, and at Sealright.

“She was a hard working woman who struggled to take care of us,” Doris said in reflection.

“That’s the way things were back then. We all worked hard if we wanted anything. I babysat and had a lot of little jobs growing up. . . Boley gave me a job at the pavilion selling tickets to the roller rink – when I was only 14!” she laughed.

Doris spoke fondly of her step-brother Bob and said they stay in touch, she said. The other members of this extended family are Charlotte Kenyon (Dopp), Jim and Tom Kenyon, and Gail Borek (Gilliland).

Thanks, Doris. It’s always fun talking to you! (And, thanks again, Bob Borek.)

North Sixth Street, Part 2

Go on, blame Gerry Garbus for suggesting I write a column about our old Sixth Ward neighborhood – and what great memories it has provoked!

Not to mention the wonderful phone calls I’ve gotten from old acquaintances who want to set the record straight, and/or, tell their story.

“You got me married to the wrong guy,” I heard a hearty laugh over the phone just after that column came out. It was Carol Koenig Spaulding, referring to the fact that I had written her up as being Carol Koenig Kellogg.

“Oops,” I said. “Sorry!” Wrong last name!

Carol was very good about it, though. She thought I probably got her last name confused with “that Ingersol girl” who I had also written about.

Yes, I agreed. It was indeed Muriel “Tootie” Ingersol who married Gary Kellogg (deceased), while Carol Koenig had indeed married Gary Spaulding (also deceased).

Having cleared that up, we chatted some more and I found out that Yvonne Diehl lives in Koenig’s old homestead on North Sixth Street.

Yvonne (sorry, I don’t know her married name) used to live with her mother and brother, Phillip, right across the street next to my grandparents. Thanks, Carol for the fun chit-chat.

This is where it gets more interesting.

A few days later, I got a call from Phillip Diehl, who winters in Florida but keeps up with the hometown news. He has a home in Oswego as well, and said he’d like to get together this summer and talk a little more about the good old days on North Sixth.

Yet, another surprise.

Who else should call me up all the way from Florida where today she makes her home, but none other than Tootie Ingersol Kellogg! Her correct first name, by the way, is spelled Maryel, not Muriel. She said she enjoys my column – especially the one about our old neighborhood.

She said she remembered the Dempsey boys — John, Earl and Dick — but couldn’t place John.

“He goes by Bill, everybody calls him Bill,” I said, to clear up that mystery. She reminded me her sister Joan married Ed Pittsley, a neighborhood boy who lived nearby on Manhattan Avenue, and that her brother Bruce married Cheryl Hayden, one of the Hayden kids that lived up back of me, (I lived on Porter Street and they lived on North Seventh) and that Bruce and Cheryl still live in Ingersols’ old home on Freemont.

And, how could I have forgotten that Geraldine Blakeslee (one of the Gerrys I had mentioned in that column), once lived on North Sixth next door to Dick Guyer. Her father was in the dry cleaning business, Tootie said.

“I think she married one of the Snow brothers,” I recalled.

“I babysat for your little sister and brother (Denise and David McKinney) when your parents went bowling,” Tootie further surprised me.

“Mike and I were probably bowling with them,” I said thoughtfully acknowledging the many years of age difference between me and my siblings, while also admitting I had no recollection of her babysitting them…but fondly remembering bowling with my Mom and Dad.

That was such a long time ago, I said. Thanks, Tootie; it was great hearing from you!

As for Gerry Garbus who started this whole thing, there’s more to come in Part 3 of North Sixth Street. Meanwhile, please enjoy the accompanying photo — the old “canning factory” on Phillips Street. Thanks, Gerry for sharing.

Now here’s my caveat:

Readers beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share.

Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up. I hope you have fun reading my stuff.

Your comments, additions and corrections are welcome. Contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan@aol.com. Please put Jerry’s Journal in the subject line. Thanks!

Fulton Bantam hockey loses to Onondaga Travel

Evan Beckwith of the Fulton Bantam hockey team scored his 15th goal of the season in his team’s recent 3-11 loss to Onondaga Travel.

On home ice, Fulton was down by 2 in the first period before Raider Seth Cooney took a pass from Beckwith and narrowed the gap by 1. The Thunder scored four times by the close of the second stanza.

Onondaga had added 5 more goals to its lead when Beckwith skated the puck through the Thunder defense and landed a shot over the goalie’s shoulder.  In the final minutes, Nick Dingman notched a goal for the Raiders, thanks to a behind the net passing play between Will Rattray and Tyler Samson.

Fulton’s goalie Adam Bleiweiss stopped 44 shots in net.

Phoenix girls’ basketball falls to Bishop Grimes

By Rob Tetro

Bishop Grimes rolled past the Phoenix girls’ varsity basketball team Jan. 4 by a score of 57-37.

With the loss, Phoenix now has an 0-7 record.

Phoenix got off to a decent start in the first quarter and added to their lead during the second quarter to go into the half leading 16-12.

But Bishop Grimes stormed ahead during the third quarter, outscoring the Lady Firebirds by 21 points to take a 17-point lead. Bishop Grimes capped off an impressive effort during the fourth quarter. They outscored Phoenix by 3 points en route to the 20-point win.

Leading the way for The Lady Firebirds was Brianna Squier who scored 12 points, followed by Samantha Doupe with 8 points, Kimberly Holbrook with 5 and  Alexandra Wilson and Shannon Dolan added 4 points each.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Call the Doctor

I remember when Milton Berle, Red Skelton and Pinky Lee were on television.

And not only that, I remember when doctors made house calls.

“Wow, you are really old. Did they come by horse and wagon?”

Well, not quite, but they came to our front door carrying their little black bag.

Dr. Ostrander and Dr. Thornton were the two who came to our home during the 40s when I was “too sick to go to school.”

I can remember both of them, but especially Dr. Thornton, who was my mother’s doctor when she was growing up.

The thing I remember most about those two doctors was that “little black bag”  they carried with them. Several tools of their trade were in that bag.

I was fascinated by the instrument that the doctor used to listen to my heartbeat, officially known as the stethoscope. I remember Dr. Thornton letting me listen to my own heart ticking.

There were always some little pills in the doctor’s bag, one for the patient and one for his little brother. We looked forward to that little pill when we discovered  it tasted a lot more like candy than like any kind of medicine could have tasted.

I especially remember a particular visit by Dr. Thornton. That day I had told my mother that I was too sick to go back to school after lunch. It wasn’t the first time she had heard that; she told me I would feel better when I got back to school.

“I think he’s really sick this time,” my friend Tucker told my mother, saying I had a hard time walking home from school.

Later in the afternoon, my mother called Dr. Thornton. After checking me over, Dr. Thornton told my mother I had all the symptoms of appendicitis.

Later that evening, he returned and Dr. Dyer, a surgeon, was with him. They had trouble finding a hospital room, but they finally did. They scheduled surgery — the next day my appendix was removed.

Dr. Ostrander was familiar with my father’s family for a long time. I don’t remember my father ever going to a doctor when I was growing up but if he did, it would have been Dr. Ostrander.

I went to Dr. Ostrander’s office when my grandfather was in charge of getting me to a doctor. I remember his white hair and I thought he was old. And, of course, I remember his “little black bag.”

TV game shows

I hadn’t watched a television game show in many years until a couple of weeks ago. We were at a pub/restaurant and the room was full of men who stopped after work for  liquid refreshment.

They were all involved in watching “Wheel of Fortune” on TV.  They were shouting answers, cheering and having a good time.

A few days ago, while visiting friends, we were watching the Wheel and Jeopardy on their new digital television set. I hadn’t watched either show in many years, except for the short time with the men at the restaurant last week, but I fondly remember watching “Jeopardy” every week night several years ago when visiting my mother.

Mom rattled off the answers quicker than the contestants, while I just sat and watched.

While watching my friends’ television set I discovered that I still don’t know the answers, and when I do, I forget to put them in the form of a question.

I was glad to see that Alex Trebeck, Pat Sajak and Vanna White are still going strong. I thought that Vanna looked particularly good on digital TV.

40 Winks

I do a lot of the writing that I do while sitting in the most comfortable chair in the house. While thinking about what I want to write and how I want to write it, I often begin to get sleepy and soon drop off for 40 winks (or even a few more than that).

Sometimes, when I open my eyes after a short (or not so short) nap, I seem to have gotten new ideas while I was “resting.” Other times I have no idea what I was thinking about and have to figure out where I was going with the half-finished thought that I left behind on paper.

This is a fairly recent development created by the fact I am now categorized as a “retiree,” and as part of that designation I have also officially become a “napper”.

A good sermon

As the father of a minister, I shouldn’t be telling minister jokes, but here’s a couple I couldn’t resist.

“The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending, and to have the two as close together as possible.” — George Burns

“The best illustration of the value of brief speech reckoned in dollars was given by Mark Twain. His story was that when he had listened for five minutes to the preacher telling of the heathen, he wept and was going to contribute $50.

“After 10 minutes more of the sermon he reduced the amount of his prospective contribution to $25.

“After half an hour more he cut the sum to $5.

“At the end of an hour of oratory when the plate was passed he took $2.”

 

. . . Roy Hodge

Phoenix boys’ hoops loses heartbreaker in Cato Tourney

By Rob Tetro

The Phoenix boys’ varsity basketball team went 2-1 in its last 3 games and now has a 5-3 overall record.

On Dec. 20, the Firebirds topped Jordan-Elbridge in the opening round of The Cato Christmas Tournament 57-50.

On Dec. 21, Phoenix fell to county foe Hannibal in The Championship Game of The Cato Christmas Tournament 48-46. Phoenix escaped with a hard fought win over Bishop Grimes on Jan. 4.

In the Jordan-Elbridge game, the Eagles had a 2-point lead over Phoenix after the first quarter and added to its lead in the second quarter, taking a 28-22 lead into halftime.

In the third quarter, Phoenix outscored Jordan-Elbridge by 9 points to take a 3-point lead and then secured the win during the fourth quarter

Leading the way for Phoenix was Dylan Doupe with 14 points, followed by Connor Haney and Zach Sisera with 12 points each. Shaun Turner scored 8 points and Bryce Plante chipped in 5 points.

Hannibal escaped with a hard fought 48-46 win over Phoenix on Dec. 21 in The Championship Game of The Cato Christmas Tournament (see Hannibal basketball story).

Phoenix the came back with an impressive win over Bishop Grimes Jan. 4. After a competitive first quarter, Phoenix had a 1-point lead over Bishop Grimes. The second quarter also was competitive and the game went into the half with the teams tied at 26.

Phoenix built a 3-point lead during the third quarter and then maintained it down the stretch, holding on for the 55-52 win.

The Firebirds were led by Brian Sawyer with 14 points, followed by Connor Haney with 12 points, Dylan Doupe scored 10 points, Walker Connoly added 7 points and Bryce Plante and Zach Sisera scored 5 points each.

Hannibal boys’ basketball wins 3 of 4

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal boys’ varsity basketball team won 3 out of its last 4 games and now has a record of 3-4.

The Warriors earned their first win of the season when they topped Skaneateles Dec. 17 by a score of 62-49. Hannibal kept it going with a 50-32 win over Cato-Meridian Dec. 20 in the opening round of The Cato Christmas Tournament.

On Dec. 21, The Warriors rallied past county rival, Phoenix, in The Championship Game of The Cato Christmas Tournament by a score of 48-46. Hannibal fell to Jordan-Elbridge Jan. 4 by a score of 65-51.

In the Skaneateles game, the game was tied at 17 after the first quarter. Hannibal built a lead during the second quarter, outscoring Skaneateles by 6 points to take a 34-28 lead into halftime.

The Warriors expanded their lead during the third quarter, outscoring the Lakers by 6 points. The Warriors continued to pile on the points in the fourth quarter to come to the final score of 62-49.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Billy Skipper with 30 points, followed by Trevor Alton with 12 and Austin Mattison and Zane Pointon with 8 points each.

Hannibal got off to a solid start against Cato-Meridian in the Cato Christmas Tourney, outscoring C-M by 9 points during the first quarter. But C-M  got right back into the game during the second quarter, outscoring Hannibal by 9 points. The game was tie at 19 at the half.

The second half belonged to the Warriors. Hannibal outscored Cato-Meridian during the third quarter to build a 10-point lead. The Warriors didn’t let up during the fourth quarter. They outscored Cato-Meridian by 8 points to cap off a 50-32 win.

Hannibal was led by Trevor Alton with 18 points, followed by Austin Mattison with 13, Sam McCraith with 9, Zane Pointon with 6 and Charlie McCraith with 4 points.

Hannibal escaped with a hard fought win over county foe Phoenix in The Championship Game of The Cato Christmas Tournament.

After a competitive first quarter, Phoenix had a 1-point lead over Hannibal. The game remained equally as competitive during the second quarter. After both teams scored 12 points each, the Firebirds took a 26-25 lead into halftime.

Phoenix added to its lead during the third quarter, leading the Warriors by 2 points. But Hannibal got it done down the stretch. They outscored Phoenix by 4 points during the fourth quarter to come away with a close 48-46 win.

Leading the way for Phoenix was Dylan Doupe with 20, followed by Zach Sisera with 10, Walker Connoly with 7 and Bryce Plante added 3.

Hannibal was led by Austin Mattison with 15, followed by Billy Skipper with 13, Sam McCraith with 11 and Trevor Alton added 9 points.

Jordan-Elbridge snapped Hannibal’s 3-game winning streak Jan. 4. The Warriors got off to a decent start, outscoring Jordan-Elbridge by 3 points during the first quarter. But J-E cut into Hannibal’s lead during the second quarter taking a 27-25 lead into the half.

Jordan-Elbridge stormed ahead during the third quarter, outscoring the Warriors by 14 points to take a 12-point lead. Jordan-Elbridge refused to let up during the fourth quarter and cruised to a 65-51 win.

Leading the way for the Warriors was Trevor Alton with 25, followed by Billy Skipper with 14, Sam McCraith scored 7 points and Zane Pointon chipped in 3 points.

Your hometown. Your news.