Gerry Vivlemore, had strong faith in God

Gerry Vivlemore, 71, of Scriba passed away Dec. 24, 2013, in Las Vegas, en route to visit her father.

Born in Syracuse in October 1942, she grew up in the Oswego area. A 1960 graduate of Bishop Cunningham High School, she had a strong faith in God that carried her through life.

She loved life and each member of her family; she will be missed by all who knew her, aloha for now.

She is survived by husband of 36 years Raymond; her children, Tina (Jeff) Henkiel of Vestal, Jim (Sue) Toy, Ken (Carolyn) Toy, both of Oswego, and Ray Vivlemore III of Auburn, and Christa VanWie of Mexico.

She is also survived by her father, John (Anita) Fragale of Arizona; and brothers John ‘Boo’ of Arizona, Tom of Nevada; sisters, Pat (Steve) Burch of Oswego and Michelle (Scott) Burgess of Texas; 11 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter; two aunts; an uncle; cousins; several nieces and nephews.

Gerry was predeceased by her mother, Francene Fragale of Oswego.

Gerry’s family wishes to give a very special thank you to the staff of University Physicians Oswego Oncology.

In lieu of flowers, please make contributions to the American Cancer Society.

Per Gerry’s wishes there are no calling hours.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. today — Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 — at St. Joseph Church, Oswego, where a Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by the Rev. Gregory Kreinheder.

The Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, 147 W. Fourth St., Oswego, is in care of the arrangements.

Cheri Sidman, longtime bookkeeper

Cheri Sidman, 66, of Hannibal, passed away Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, at home surrounded by her loving family.

Born in Syracuse, she lived in Baldwinsville and was a graduate of C.W. Baker High School before moving to Hannibal.

Cheri retired from OVIA/Streeter & VanSanford Insurance as the office manager after many years of service and was a professional bookkeeper.

She was a member of Hannibal Center United Methodist Church where she was bookkeeper and Hannibal Center Cemetery as bookkeeper and board member.

Cheri was a member of the Fulton Art Guild and was a painter in oils, watercolors and charcoals.

She enjoyed the outdoors, gardening and photography.

Cheri was predeceased by her parents, Robert and Betty Reid and twin grandchildren, Jenna and Elaina Sidman.

Surviving are her husband of 35 years, Lee Sidman of Hannibal; three children, Alesia Byers of Titusville, FL, Casey Ware of Bradenton, FL and Arthur (Amy) Sidman of Hannibal; grandchildren, Sidney, Mallory, Kaleb and Caden; three siblings, Robert (Colleen) Reid of North Syracuse, Mark Reid of Brewerton and Debbie (Harry) Moffat of Pennellville as well as many nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were Thursday, Jan. 9, at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St., Hannibal. Services followed.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Hannibal Center United Methodist Church Memorial Fund, c/o Diane Whitcomb, 531 County Route 21, Hannibal, NY, 13074.

Real estate group donates to homeless youth program

The Oswego County Board of Realtors® recently presented Karen Merrill, coordinator of Oswego County Opportunities’ PATH program with a check in support of the programs’ efforts of helping area youth. Each year, the Oswego County Board of Realtors® organizes a fundraiser for the PATH program.

“Our members open their hearts and their pocketbooks to support the PATH Program,” said Gene Friske, Executive Officer of the Oswego County Board of Realtors®.

“We are happy to be able to assist such a worthwhile endeavor as OCO’s PATH program and I am pleased to say that our support has increased steadily over the years,” Friske added.

Established in 1991, OCO’s PATH program has provided hundreds of homeless youth with transitional independent living services and helped them become contributing members of society.

This year, the program was awarded another 5-year grant from the federal government to continue to provide services to the homeless youth of Oswego County.

“The donations we receive from caring organizations such as the Oswego County Board of Realtors® helped us provide youth in the PATH program with a little something special at Christmas such as food, clothing, and some gifts, many times these gifts are the only ones these youth receive.,” Merrill said.

“The homeless youth population is a very misunderstood and many times, unjustly criticized population,” added Merrill.  “PATH helps youth realize there are members of the community and that their community supports them and acknowledges the positive things they are doing to better themselves.”

Those interested in learning more about the PATH program may contact Karen Merrill at OCO’s Crisis & Development Services office, 598-6664, ext. 1708.

Birdlebough grads discuss gender stereotypes, healthy relationships

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Two John C. Birdlebough graduates returned to the Phoenix Central School District as educators this week, promoting healthy relationships and discussing gender stereotypes.

The 2002 graduates, Megan Bittel, an educator with Oswego County Opportunities’ Services to Aid Families program, and Colleen Saxby, community development manager with the Girl Scouts, led discussions with middle school students in Joe Adams’ health classes.

Divided into two groups – one for boys and one for girls – the educators addressed a variety of social and relationship issues that commonly lead to bullying.

“We are working to identify gender stereotypes and hoping they can break these stereotypes through education,” Bittel said.

“We teach acceptance of others, we should be aware of things that affect bullying so we can put an end to it.”

The group of boys talked about the adjectives that describe what society believes a man should be, the misconceptions that still exist in regard to male and female roles, and the judgment that teens often face from their peers if they don’t possess “typical” male traits.

“The reality is that boys and men who don’t fit neatly into these stereotypical categories, they’re called some pretty nasty things … sissy, wuss, wimp, girl. What message are we sending to boys when the worst thing they can be called is a girl?” Bittel asked.

“No one deserves to be called names because they don’t fit into this teeny, tiny box society expects them to,” she said.

Both Bittel and Saxby also discussed the importance of healthy relationships, from friendships to dating. Topics included dating violence and age of consent.

“This program teaches students what a healthy relationship looks like,” Saxby said. “It gives them a sense of self.”

The educational initiative spanned several days, with five classes participating in two sessions each.

Former Fulton resident ordained a priest in ceremony in Rome, Italy

Nicholas Fisher, of Fulton, was among 31 men who were ordained to the priesthood by His Eminence Cardinal Velasio de Paolis, CS, Pontifical Delegate for the Legionaries of Christ on Dec. 14 at the Papal Basilica of St. John Lateran, Rome, Italy.

Of the total 31 new priests, eight are American and one from Canada. The others are from Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Germany, France, Columbia and Chile.

Fisher said he had the beginnings of a calling as young child living in New York state.

The Fishers’ home parish was Our Lady of the Rosary in Hannibal, where Nicholas Fisher received his first sacraments and was an altar server during the Rev. Dennis Hartnett’s pastorate.

At the age of 5, Fisher remembers being in Mass at his local parish.

“That day our parish priest, Father Hartnett, a holy man, asked me if I would like to ring the bells during the consecration.  I said yes, so he gave me the bells and I sat in the first pew with my mother.

“At the moment of the consecration, she told me when to ring them, and I did, first for the consecration of the bread, and then of the wine. At that moment, I remember, I thought for the first time that perhaps I would like to be a priest.

“After that it was something I thought about over and over again all these years,” Fisher said. “I come from a Catholic family and we were educated in the faith. They always told me when the priest says those words and they ring the bells, the bread becomes the body of Christ.

“We used to talk with my friends about what we wanted to be when we grew up: of course one wanted to be a politician, another a firefighter, another a doctor, another the president,” he said. “In short, we all wanted to be heroes. In that instant, there in my parish church, I understood in some way that the priest is more important than all those others, for only he can change the bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus.”

Fisher was born in Oswego June 5, 1982, to David and Carol Fisher, then residing in Sterling. they now live in Fulton.

His grandparents are the late Robert and Angie Arduini of Fulton and the late Carl and Dolores Fisher of Williamson.

As a young boy, Fishers attended Fulton Catholic and Seton Home Study Schools. In the summer of 1993 he entered the minor seminary of the Legionaries of Christ in Center Harbor, N.H.

In 1998, he joined the Legionaries of Christ as a novice, and did his novitiate in Salamanca, Spain, from 1998 to 2000.

He studied humanities at the order’s College of Humanities in Cheshire, Conn.Fisher has a bachelor’s degree in theology and a master’s degree in philosophy, both from the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum in Rome, Italy.

He has done apostolic internships in New York, Padua (Italy), and Vienna (Austria). He was ordained a deacon by the Rev. Msgr. Renato Boccardo, Archbishop of Spoleto-Norcia (Italy) in Rome June 29, 2013 and a priest Dec. 14, 2013 also in Rome.

Ten members of the family traveled to Italy to attend the ordination and events in Rome before and after, including a general audience and Sunday Angelus with Pope Francis, a retreat for families of the newly ordained, a presentation on the Shroud of Turin and Fisher’s first Mass the day after his ordination.

He was assisted by the Rev. Sylvester Heereman, LC, Vicar General and acting General Director of the Legion of Christ.

Fisher offered his first Masses of Thanksgiving in the United States at Our Lady of The Rosary Church, Hannibal, the Legionary Seminary in Cheshire, Conn., the Guardians of the Eucharist Center in Salina and at Holy Trinity Church, Fulton.

He also concelebrated and presided at several Masses throughout the Christmas season at Holy Trinity in Fulton, assisting temporary administrator the Rev. Richard Morisette, Deacon David Sweenie and the Rev. Moritz Fuchs.

Fisher returned Jan. 2 to his first assignment as chaplain of a Catholic elementary school in Mexico City.

For more details about their stories, go to ordenaciones.legionariosdecristo.org.

The Legionaries of Christ are a religious congregation of priests of pontifical rite founded in 1941 in Mexico. Members include four bishops, 932 priests and some 900 religious in preparation for the priesthood.

Fulton author needs stories on the Blizzard of ’66

By Debra J. Groom

Local author Jim Farfaglia remembers playing board games with his siblings as the mighty Blizzard of ‘66 blew outside his Granby home.

And he figures there have got to be lots of other folks in Central New York with memories of the storm for all ages. He’s gathering these stories for a book on the blizzard to come out right before the 50th anniversary of the storm in 2016.

“I think everyone who has a childhood memory of it gets a smile on their face when they think about it,” he said. “When I write my books, I like to use personal observations, so I’d like people to talk to me about their memories of the blizzard.”

To contact Farfaglia, email him at sjimf903@twcny.rr.com or call him from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 402-2297.

People who lived through the Blizzard of ‘66 will tell everyone how that storm was worse than any other storm since.

“I think part of that is people actually feared for their life in 1966,” Farfaglia said. “There was not a lot of TV coverage and people were not quite sure what was going on.”

Farfaglia remembers his father being out of work for a week from his job at Sealright in Fulton. The four kids played board games all week while his dad, getting a little stir crazy being inside with the kids all week, fashioned himself some homemade snowshoes and walked to the Triangle Dairy.

”Weather gets people so down,” he said. “I hope this book is a fun way for people to look at it.”

The weather outside has been frightful

By Debra J. Groom

The letter “S” has been at the forefront of Oswego County residents’ minds of late.

It could stand for shivering — temperatures Friday Jan. 3 and Tuesday Jan. 7 were beyond cold. With wind chills, the mercury on Tuesday never made it to zero.

Can you say minus 25 degrees?

It was actually colder Friday, Jan. 3, but the wind chills were not as frigid. Temps that day got down to about minus 5 as residents cheered the lack of wind.

“S” also could stand for snow. As of Tuesday, Jan. 7, Fulton had 72 inches of snow for the season, said John Florek at the city’s water works, an official reporting station for the National Weather Service.

For the storm that hit the Oswego-Fulton area beginning Thursday, Jan. 2, through Friday, Jan. 3, Fulton got about 9 inches.

Weather observer Paul Cardinali measured 9 inches for that storm while Florek measured 9.8 inches.

William Gregway, who is a National Weather Service observer in Oswego, said the Port City saw about 13.5 for that storm.

But nothing in the county’s two cities even comes close to the northern part of the county -— namely the snow capital, Redfield.

Weather observer Carolyn Yerdon said the area already has topped 200 inches for the season — and it’s only the beginning of January.

“We are having a pretty wild winter so far — 224 inches and counting!” she said. “This is the most snow I have recorded in the past 18 years this early in the season.

“We should be headed for possibly a record breaking year if we can get over 420 inches, which is the current record (from 96-97 winter season),” Yerdon said.

The final “S” could stand for shoveling — something folks from Pulaski north have been doing more than they’d like.

After the Thursday-Friday storm of last week, a huge lake effect band swept off Lake Ontario Monday and didn’t move much for a couple of days.

Yerdon said another 17 inches fell in Redfield from 1 p.m. Monday to about 2 p.m. Tuesday and then another 5 inches came down Wednesday.

The season’s total is at 224 inches as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 7.

The bitter cold actually has been causing more problems for folks in the Fulton-Oswego area than the snow.

AAA reported on its website Tuesday afternoon that areas such as Fulton and Oswego had three-hour waits for service calls.

The same was true for the Interstate 81 corridor from Mexico to Adams Center in Jefferson County.

Cardinali said he recorded a high Fulton temperature on Jan. 7 of 6 degrees and a low of minus 2.

But with winds gusting up to 45 mph, Cardinali estimates wind chills in the minus 25 to minus 30 range.

“These were the coldest wind chills we’ve had since Jan. 17, 1982,” he said.

It was actually colder Jan 3, with a high of 8 and a low of minus 5. “But there was not as much wind,” Cardinali said.

On that bitter day, Fulton saw a high of minus 4, a low of minus 8 and winds more than 40 mph.

Oswego County search and rescue academy to begin

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Pioneer Search and Rescue Team will begin its second Search and Rescue Academy beginning March 6.

Class size is limited to 24 individuals. Classes begin March 6 and end June 15.

The academy will be held primarily at the Oswego County Emergency Response and Training Center, 720 E. Seneca St., Oswego. Classes will be held on Thursday nights and one to two weekend days a month.

Individuals interested in attending  should obtain an application at the team’s website or contact Dan Arena at djarena@gmail.com.

Completed applications, along with a check for $100, should be mailed to the team at:  Oswego County Search and Rescue, PO Box 229, Parish, NY  13131-0229.

Applications must be received no later than Feb. 16, 2014.

“The curriculum will provide a thorough introduction to Search and Rescue and meets the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s minimum training requirements,” said Roger Fox, Oswego County SAR Coordinator.

The SAR Academy will cover topics such as map and compass, global positioning systems, man-tracking, wilderness survival, radio communications, search techniques, cold weather emergencies, crime scene preservation, the National Incident Management Systems (NIMS), and a variety of other topics.

Individuals who complete the Academy will be certified  as state Deaprtment of Environmental Conservation Basic Wildlands Searcher, certified in Wilderness First Aid, American Heart Association CPR, certified as a Project Lifesaver Electronic Search Specialist.

The academy is open to all interested individuals — applicants do not need to reside in Oswego County.

Students should be in good health, at least 18 years of age, and capable of passing a moderate physical fitness test.  Graduates of the academy who are accepted onto a local SAR team may be eligible to have their course fee reimbursed.

More information can be found at the team’s web site www.oswegosar.org.

All applicants will be contacted and interviewed prior to selection to the Academy. As soon as the class selection is finalized, applicants will be contacted.  Individuals who are not accepted into the class will have their money refunded.

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