Flood waters recede in Sandy Creek area

Flood waters in the Town of Sandy Creek west of Route 3 along the shoreline of Lake Ontario are beginning to recede today, town officials reported, but people in the area should continue to use caution and follow flood safety tips.

The water has receded about 8 inches overnight following flooding that occurred along North Pond in the Town of Sandy Creek. While the water is continuing to recede, town officials stressed, the levels are still not back below normal and changes in weather conditions could cause them to rise again.

Town Supervisor Nancy Ridgeway, Town Highway Superintendent Mike Kastler, and County Legislator Margaret Kastler (1st District), along with Oswego County Emergency Management Office Director Dale A. Currier continue to monitor the situation closely. Highway Superintendent Kastler said roads in the area, especially ones that have had water over them, are being watched carefully.

“People should continue be very aware of their surroundings,” Town Supervisor Ridgeway said. Residents and property owners west of Route 3 in the town should continue to check their residences and ensure their propane and other gas tanks are secured. If necessary, they should turn off electrical power.

People who have a life-threatening situation should call 911.

“We also have a concern for ice fishermen on Sandy Pond,” Highway Superintendent Kastler said. “We urge them to use extreme caution and to check the New York State Department of Conservation web site (http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7733.html)  for recommended guidelines on ice thickness.”

Highway Superintendent Kastler reminded travelers not to drive over flooded roadways.

Town officials have lined up a source of bottled water in the event it’s necessary, Town Supervisor Ridgeway said.  “We’re fortunate to have the assistance of the Salvation Army in our town,” she said.

Town residents with questions or needing assistance other than life-threatening situations may email the town supervisor at scsupervisor@frontiernet.net, or call the town hall at 315/387-5456 during business hours. For updates, people can go to the town’s web page at www.sandycreekny.us.

The governor’s declaration of a State of Emergency for heavy lake effect snow on the Tug Hill last week includes Oswego County and is still in effect, Currier said. County Emergency Management and town officials are working to secure state resources to aid the flooding situation in the town.

 

 

Light In The Darkness

“It is God Who works in me both to will and to do for His good pleasure.”   (Phil. 2:13).

Nothing is more important in the life of the children of God than becoming fully persuaded that God does indeed lead his children on their journey from earth to heaven.

Besides building your confidence in God, I hope that this brief message helps you to face the great decisions of life. I hope it helps you this very week as you come to those moments when you must decide, when you come to those crossroads that everybody comes to, and you must make a decision.

It is my prayer that you will have confidence that God is leading you in exactly the direction he wants you to go.

Since God is in control of the minute details of life, you can relax, knowing that he will reveal his plan for your life step by step. God’s will is more like a sunrise than a sunburst.

Early in the morning the sun begins to peek above the eastern horizon. At first the sky lightens, then the first rays streak across the sky, then the rim of the sun begins to rise slowly from the earth.

Eventually the whole sun is revealed, rising until it dominates the sky, giving light to the earth, driving the darkness away.

God’s will is like that. At first we see his plan dimly, then the outline begins to emerge. Slowly over time, the clouds vanish, the darkness disappears, and the brightness of his presence fills our lives.

Do you get anxious at sunrise because all you can see is the tiny rim of the sun? No, because you know that you only have to wait to see the sun in all its brilliance.

The same is true of God’s plan for your life. We never see the whole thing in advance, but if we wait long enough, God reveals his will.

So relax! God is in charge. Soon enough the darkness will vanish and all that is vague will be made perfectly clear. God is in charge and he knows exactly what he is doing in your life.

Our response might be expressed in a prayer like this, “Loving Father, teach us to trust you. We want clear direction, and you say, ‘Give Me your heart.’ When we want precise answers, you say, “Trust me to do right.”

When we want to know about tomorrow, you say, “Follow me today.” So, Lord, help us today to give You our hearts individually and personally. Make us willing to be made willing to do your will in everything. We pray in Jesus’ name, Amen.”

Then, as you walk through the day, express confidence that these words are true; “I am led by the Spirit of God for I am a son (or daughter) of God.”   (Romans 8:14)

(Adapted with permission from author Dr. Ray Pritchard)

Pastor David M. Grey

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church

Sign up for young boater safety course

The US Coast Guard Auxiliary and New York Sea Grant will offer the Young Boater Safety Certificate Training at the Central New York Boat Show Feb. 12-16, at the state Fairgrounds in
Geddes.

The course is for age 10 to 17. Successful completion of the 8-hour course and  exam is required for youth to legally operate a motorized boat or watercraft alone on New York state waters.

Registration for limited space is now open for the two-part course that will be taught at the Central New York Boat Show from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 and 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15 in the Horticulture Building Seminar Room.

Both sessions must be completed. Pre-registration is required with New York Sea Grant by phone at 312-3042.

Each youth registering for the course will receive three free admission passes into the 2014 show that is New York’s largest and oldest boat show.

The Central New York Boat Show fills three buildings with more than 500 boats, including the 2014 New York Sea Grant Discover Clean & Safe Boating vessels, plus water recreation equipment; marine accessories; boating, fishing and Adirondack guides; charter captains, water recreation industry leaders and waterfront destinations with exhibits, information and mini-seminar exhibits.

The show’s Boating Information Center is expanding in 2014 to include the New York Sea Grant Launch Steward voluntary watercraft inspection program along with boating, tourism, safety, invasive species and law enforcement exhibits by local, state and federal organizations.

Boat show hours are 1 to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $10/person, children 13 and younger enter free, with free parking and shuttles.

Fulton woman warns of scam

By Ashley M. Casey

Although it hasn’t deterred her from entering any more contests, Fulton resident Fanny Knapp wants to let community members know about a Publishers Clearing House-style scam she discovered last week.

Knapp, 85, has entered several of the real Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes a few times a year for the last two or three years, and has purchased a few of their magazines and other items, but she has never won anything.

Last Thursday evening, however, she received a call informing her that she had won a cash prize.

The caller, who claimed to be an employee for Publishers Clearing House, told Knapp to call (702) 516-5521 and ask for “Michael Best.” Knapp called twice, but the line was busy both times.

Finally, “Michael Best” called back and asked Knapp to send in a $50 gift card to claim her prize. She became suspicious.

“He asked me how far I live from Walmart, and I thought, ‘That’s a strange question,’ because Publishers Clearing House already knows where I live,” said Knapp.

She said she receives six to eight letters a month from Publishers Clearing House. In addition to sales offers, the letters include “sweepstakes facts” that outline the rules of the sweepstakes and how winners will be contacted.

“It says in the letter … the winners will be contacted by mail,” Knapp said.

She realized it was a scam and took note of the phone number. Knapp called The Post-Standard in Syracuse to share her story and was also interviewed by WSYR. She said she alerted the media so that “somebody else might not fall for it.”

Publishers Clearing House’s website has a page called “Fraud Protection” that explains how to spot a possible scam. It says winners of major prizes — that is, $1,000 or more — are only notified in person.

Winners of smaller prizes are contacted by mail. Publishers Clearing House does not call winners beforehand. The site also warns people not to send money to claim a prize, as Knapp was asked to do.

Despite her encounter with a scammer, Knapp said she still plans on entering for Publishers Clearing House’s sweepstakes prizes, though she won’t be spending money on the company any time soon.

“Earlier this month, you got a prize if you ordered something, so I ordered some shears,” she said. “I won’t order anything else this year.”

For more information on how to avoid a sweepstakes scam, visit info.pch.com/consumer-information/fraud-protection.

Got a summer event? Contact the county tourism office

The Oswego County Tourism Office is compiling information for its 2014 “Summer in Oswego County” brochure.

Events that take place between April and October will be posted on the county tourism Web site and listed in the calendar, which is widely distributed at travel and vacation shows, chambers of commerce, NYS Thruway information centers, businesses and other outlets.

“The brochure typically includes more than 200 events as well as information on fishing tournaments, farm markets, outdoor concerts, and other summer activities,” said David Turner, director of the Department of Community Development, Tourism and Planning.

Organizations and businesses have until Wednesday, Feb. 19 to submit information.

People can fill out a form online and submit it directly to the Tourism Office at http://visitoswegocounty.com/more-to-see-do/calendar/events-in-oswego-county-entry-form/.

Forms have been sent to those who have submitted information in the past.

For more information, contact the Oswego County Tourism Office weekdays at 349-8322 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 8322, or e-mail fobrien@oswegocounty.com.

Frances L. Kray, former secretary for Dr. Tripp, SUNY Oswego

Frances L. Kray, 83, of Oswego, died Friday Jan. 10 at Morningstar Care Center, Oswego.

She was born in Oswego the daughter of the late Francis and Edith Boyer.

Mrs. Kray was a former secretary for Dr. Sam Tripp, and at SUNY Oswego.

She was a communicant of St. Joseph Church, and the Lord’s Delight Prayer Community. Mrs. Kray was a loving and caring wife, mother, grandmother and sister.

She is survived by her husband of 61 years, Richard Kray of Oswego; children Carolyn Barcomb, of Oswego, Diane (Tom) Murray of Oswego, Timothy (Elizabeth) Kray of Florida, Gerald (Linda) Kray of Oswego, Patrick Kray of Oswego, James (Marcia) Kray of Oswego and Mary (Rodney) Gehan of Oswego; brothers, James (Peggy) Boyer of Oswego and Edward (Terry) Boyer of Fla.; sisters Dorothy Kenyon of Oswego and Evelyn (Jack) Hennessey of St. Louis; several grandchildren and great grandchildren.

She was predeceased by her sister Eleanor Parker.

Funeral services were Tuesday Jan. 14 at the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, Oswego, and at St. Joseph Church where a Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated by Rev. Gregory Kreinheder.

Burial was in St. Peter’s Cemetery, Oswego. Calling hours were Monday Jan. 13 at the funeral home, 147 W. Fourth St., Oswego.

Bernice F. Smith, loved to bake, sew

Bernice R. Smith, 87, of Fulton, passed away Wednesday afternoon at the Manor at Seneca Hill.

She was born in Fulton, a daughter to the late Bennie and Frances Clothier. She lived all her life in Fulton.

Bernice was a homemaker and loved to bake and sew.

She was predeceased by her husband, Richard F. Smith in 2007 and by a daughter, Darcy Smith in 1985.

Bernice is survived by her seven children, Dianne (Joe) Stewart of  Fairport, Dennise (Bob) Matzke of Matthews, NC, Reid (Janet) Smith of Kennedy, NY, Ricky (Nancy) Smith of Oxford, NY, Regan (Marilyn) Smith of Smyrna, NY, Donna (Walt) Ellis of Mill Spring, NC and Debbie (Mike) Smith of Fulton; several grandchildren, great grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

There are no calling hours or funeral services. Burial will be in the spring at Jacksonville Cemetery, Lysander.

Foster Funeral Home, Fulton has care of arrangements.

Is pet insurance worth the cost? Porky and Buddy answer the question

Dear Porky and Buddy,

I am about to adopt my very first pet, a yellow lab named Shirley, and I am so excited, but a friend asked me if I was going to get pet insurance for her and I acted like I knew what she was talking about, but really I had no idea.

Is pet insurance a good idea? And if so, how do you go about choosing a plan?  Do you have any suggestions?

Barb

Dear Barb,

First of all, thank you for adopting Shirley — we suspect she is excited too!

We can’t make specific recommendations about pet insurance because there are so many plans with so many different considerations that it would be impossible.

Start out though by talking to your vet to ask if there are any plans they would or would not recommend. Although vets generally don’t deal with the insurance companies directly — you pay upfront and then get reimbursed — they probably hear from their clients about their experiences.

Should you get the insurance?  We think it is often a good idea, as veterinary costs continue to rise, primarily because there is so much more that veterinarians can do now to protect the  health of our pets.

If you have a good plan, that is one less thing to have to  worry about. But you need to do your research.

Here are some basic considerations:

** The insurance provider should clearly spell out to you the details of coverage for routine and/or wellness care as well as emergency treatments and conditions that require extensive care.

Find out whether and how your premiums will be increased as your pet ages or if you make any claims.

** Find out how the plan defines and handles pre-existing conditions (diseases or conditions your pet already has – or has had) prior to purchasing the plan.

In some cases, insurance providers will not insure a specific pet or breed of pet, or may limit the number of pets you can insure, if they consider them “high risk.”  You need to know about those limitations, especially based on what you know about Shirley’s health history.

** All of the charges, including co-pays, deductibles, add-on charges and other fees, should be clearly explained to you so you fully understand the policy and its limitations.

** Ask the insurance provider how claims are processed as well as the time frame for reimbursement of your expenses so you know what to expect.

If you feel that you are not getting clear answers to your questions try another plan. There are too many of them out there — you can find them with a simple Google search–to settle for one that does not answer questions clearly.

We hope that you have many happy healthy years with Shirley, but if she does need veterinary care, we also hope that you are able to find a good solution for providing it.

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County. Our office is at 265 W. First St., Oswego. Phone is 207-1070. Email: ochscontact@hotmail.com Website: www.oswegohumane.org

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