Phoenix boys’ hoops boost record to 7-4

By Rob Tetro

The Phoenix boys’ varsity basketball team has won 2 out of its last 3 games and now has an overall record of 7-4.

On Jan. 10, the Firebirds came away with an exciting win over Marcellus 53-52. Phoenix rolled past Solvay Jan. 13 by a score of 62-37 but the fell to Syracuse-ITC 60-54 on Jan. 14.

Against Marcellus, the first period was competitive and Phoenix led by just 1 at the end. In the second, Marcellus stormed ahead, outscoring Phoenix by 11 points for a 31-21 lead at the half.

The Firebirds answered back during the third quarter, outscoring Marcellus by 10 points to tie the game at 42 going into the fourth quarter. Then the Firebirds got it done during the fourth quarter, outscored Marcellus down the stretch to escape with a 53-52 win.

Phoenix was led by Dylan Doupe with 13 points, followed by Bryce Plante with 11, Brian Sawyer and Zach Sisera scored 7 points, Connor Haney added 6 and Walker Connoly chipped in 5.

Phoenix cruised past Solvay, even though Solvay outscored the Firebirds by 4 in the first quarter.

Phoenix cut into the deficit during the second quarter and Solvay led by only 2 — 23-21 — at the half.

Phoenix took over in the second half. They outscored Solvay by 12 points during the third quarter to take a 10-point lead and then didn’t let up in the fourth, outscoring Solvay 41-14 during the third and fourth quarters.

Leading the way for Phoenix was Zach Sisera with 14 points, followed by Walker Connoly with 11, Dylan Doupe and Brian Sawyer scored 10 each, Connor Haney chipped in 7 and Bryce Plante added 6 points.

In their loss to Syracuse-ITC, the first quarter was tight with Syracuse-ITC having only a 1-point lead after the first quater. Syracuse-ITC added to its lead during the second quarter and took a 35-28 lead into halftime.

The Firebirds cut into the deficit during the third quarter, bringing Syracuse-ITC’s lead to 5 points. But Phoenix couldn’t get any closer.

Phoenix was led by Dylan Doupe with 17 points, followed by Connor Haney with 13, Brian Sawyer and Zach Sisera scored 7 each, Bryce Plante had 6 and Walker Connoly added 4 points for The Firebirds.

Hannibal boys’ hoops suffer two losses

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal boys’ varsity basketball team lost its last 2 games, falling to Cazenovia 49-27 and the Syracuse Academy of Science 77-52.

Hannibal now has a 3-6 overall record.

Cazenovia cruised past the Warriors Jan. 9. Cazenovia got off to an impressive start, outscoring Hannibal by 12 points in the first quarter.

After an evenly played second quarter, Cazenovia took a 21-9 lead into halftime. Cazenovia wasn’t about to let up during the second half. They outscored the Warriors during the third quarter to expand their lead to 13 points. Caz put the game out of reach in the fourth quarter, outscoring the Warriors by 9 points.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Trevor Alton with 9 points, followed by Billy Skipper with 7, Sam McCraith scored 5 and Charlie McCraith and Austin Mattison chipped in 3 points each.

Syracuse Academy of Science topped Hannibal Jan. 14. Syracuse Academy Of Science got off to a decent start, outscoring the Warriors by 6 points during the first quarter. Syracuse Academy Of Science kept it going during the second quarter, again outscoring Hannibal by 6 to take a 38-26 halftime lead.

Syracuse Academy of Science put the game out of reach during the third quarter, outscoring Hannibal by 10. Hannibal tried to come back in the fourth quarter, but Syracuse Academy of Science still outscored Hannibal to cap off a 77-52 win.

The Warriors were led by Trevor Alton with 27 points, followed by Billy Skipper with 13 and Charlie McCraith and Sam McCraith scored 4 points each.

A Sportsman’s World — Smelt Fishing, by Leon Archer

By Leon Archer

I have many fond memories of smelt fishing with my father and additional memories of doing the same with some of my children.

I am confident many of my readers remember the great spring smelt runs with the same relish that I do, their thoughts very likely mixed with the same despondency that comes to me as I mourn the collapse of the smelt population.

There are still rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario, but their numbers have fallen to a level where very few hardy souls still search for them on cold spring nights, at least in the streams of the Eastern Ontario basin.

In the 1950s and 60s, when the lake’s water temperature hit 42 degrees, the smelt would move onshore for their annual spawning run. Fishermen by the hundreds would be waiting for them dressed in warm clothes and waders, holding their long handled nets.

The catching was easy, the cleaning arduous the next day. The delicious aroma of frying smelt could be detected escaping from homes on every block. The smelt was a fish for the common man, but all good things come to an end.

The decline of smelt populations has occurred over much of their range, not just in Lake Ontario, and there is no one reason that fisheries biologists have been able to single out as the culprit. It appears smelt have been negatively affected by a combination of factors. Among them are: the huge increase of major predators due to stocking of trout and salmon, the invasion of the zebra mussel, alewives and overfishing.

Probably the greatest factor at work in their decline in Ontario has been the decrease in the food they eat, both as fry and as young adults. A high percentage of the microorganisms needed for smelt fry survival are filtered out of the water by zebra mussels, and alewives, causing a great loss of baby smelt due to starvation.

Alewives (mooneyes to some) prey on the slightly larger organisms that the tiny surviving smelt need to continue growing, plus they also consume large numbers of smelt fry. It is a tough life for smelt right from the beginning, and the survival rate is extremely low during the first year of their lives.

As soon as the remaining smelt are large enough to migrate to the open lake away from the near shore (one to two years depending on growth rate), they join whatever smelt school they encounter and spend the rest of their life searching for food and trying to avoid trout and salmon.

Overfishing was not a significant factor on smelt while there were huge shoals of them throughout Ontario. They could absorb man’s overenthusiastic harvests and still grow their numbers back in the 50s and 60s. There was no creel limit on Ontario’s smelt in those days.

Things began changing in the 1970s and 80s, and smelt runs began their decline, almost unnoticed at first. Catches of washtubs full of smelt slowly gave way to a few five gallon buckets full of smelt and then to small buckets partly full.

The day finally came when men no longer swarmed onto the beach in the night at Selkirk State Park and Port Ontario in April and May in search of smelt. The runs had become only a memory.

As I said, there are still smelt in Lake Ontario. They are smaller and far less numerous, but they are there. I’ve heard rumors that a few are still caught in Oswego Harbor each spring, but it’s been at least 25 years since I’ve taken my Coleman lantern and gone smelting.

I do miss it, but I’m not sure I would go again even if they made a comeback here in the Oswego County area. I miss the excitement and camaraderie, but I’m not crazy about late nights and cold, plus the occasional dunking.

Should you have a hankering to try to regain a bit of those smelt fishing days of yesteryear, you could give it a try on the western end of the lake. They still get a pretty good run on the Niagara River.

It’s sort of a long drive for little fish, and the daily limit is eight quarts of smelt. The place to go, if you are so inclined, is Lewiston. There is plenty of parking by the dock area, and it’s open to dipping for smelt. The run can be as early as late March, but usually comes in April.

Lewiston is a little too far to run to just take a chance or to see if they are running, but you can find out when the run is on if you would like to take the trip.

It’s possible to stay abreast of the smelt run by checking www.outdoorsniagara.com. There is a regular fishing update on the site all year long, and it will make it easy for you to zero in on the best time to go.

Could be fun to get some of your fishing buddies together to share the expenses and catch some smelt once more in memory of the old days. If you go, let me know.

Valentine’s Day at CNY Arts Center

Valentine’s Day falls on a romantic Friday this year, so come celebrate with CNY Arts Center as we host a dinner theater Feb. 14 followed by two nights of desserts.

Tickets for Friday night are $25/person and are available on line or at ARTs in the HeART Gallery, South First Street, Fulton.

The dinner will feature a pasta bar with various sauces, pastas and toppings, including vegetarian and gluten-free selections. Joshua Lamb, our cook from the December Cabaret dinner, will prepare the meal.

The production is “Searching for Eden:  the Diaries of Adam and Eve,” a romantic comedy by James Still. CNY Arts Center will offer hand-made valentines available for pick up at the door or at the gallery. Customize your valentines by ordering on-line at www.cnyartscenter.com.

CNY Arts Center continues its capital campaign to raise money to acquire the former Rite Aid building on Route 481 in Fulton.

Classes in various art forms and writing are offered regularly at the CNY Art Center in the basement of the Methodist Church on the corner of State and Park Streets.

Juried Student Exhibition begins Jan. 31 at SUNY Oswego

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

Tyler Art Gallery at SUNY Oswego will host the 51st annual Juried Student Exhibition starting Friday, Jan. 31.

The exhibition, running concurrently through March 1 with a display titled “Recollection: A Memory Loss Awareness Project,” will open from 5 to 7 p.m. Jan. 31 in Tyler Hall with a free public reception featuring the student artists.

The Juried Student Exhibition welcomed 150 submissions from undergraduates around campus, and 62 were selected for the show, said Michael Flanagan, director of Tyler Art Gallery.

Artistic media included are book arts, drawings, paintings, photographs, digital illustrations, ceramics, sculpture, prints and newer media such as websites, digital animation and web applications.

Serving as jurors for this exhibition were Michelle Roberts of Rochester, a 2006 Oswego alumna and owner of Michelle Roberts Design and Novus Creative, and Peter Valenti of Syracuse, a 1983 alumnus, teacher and developer of the ceramics program at East Syracuse Minoa High School, co-founder and president of the Independent Potters Association and director of the high school ceramics exhibition Central New York Feats of Clay.

In addition to “Recollection” and the juried student exhibition opening that night, the “Guerrilla Gorilla Grad Art Exhibition” will display recent work of SUNY Oswego students in master’s-related art programs from 5 to 7 p.m. on Jan. 31 in the Student Gallery, Room 21 of Tyler Hall.

Tyler Art Gallery is open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays when college is in session.

Parking for Tyler Art Gallery patrons without a current SUNY Oswego parking permit is $1. For more information, visit oswego.edu/administration/parking. Parking is available in the employee and commuter lots east of Culkin Hall, the college’s seven-story main administration building.

Lakeside Artisans offering class on making zippered pouches

A class to learn how to make cute and useful zippered pouches is being offered from 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 30 at Lakeside Artisans, 191 W. First St., in Canal Commons in Oswego.

The instructor, Kathy Fenlon, will demonstrate how to make three different styles of a zippered pouch and three different easy ways to put in a zipper.

Students will select from a variety of fabric and make three different pouches. Each pouch will have a different (practically fool proof) way to install a zipper.

Students may make their pouches any size they wish. They will also learn different ways to embellish the pouches.

These are very practical and can be used for a variety of things such as jewelry, make-up, a mini-wallet, photos, camera, cell phone etc. They make great gifts.

The class fee of $45 includes all supplies to make the three zippered pouches. There is a non-refundable deposit of $10 per participant.

To register for the class, or for more information, call 342-8880 or lakesideartisans@gmail.com . Also, you can visit our website, www.lakesideartisans.com , or visit us on Facebook.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Reading Old News

Packing away the Christmas decor-ations is a part of the holiday routine that I don’t particularly enjoy.

Like almost everything that “has to be done,” that job is not a whole lot of fun.

But, there is a small part of the process that I like and even look forward to. I enjoy looking through and reading some of the old papers used to wrap everything up before it is put in boxes to go back in the attic.

Since we use the same papers for a few years, until they are useless, it is an opportunity to jog my memory, news wise.

A story about celebrities observing their 60th birthday during the year ahead was the feature article on a newspaper page dated Jan. 6, 2006. President Bill Clinton, Dolly Parton and former Yankee Reggie Jackson would all turn 60 in 2006 according to the article.

The next day, on Jan. 7, 2006, President Bush shrugged off a report showing weaker than expected job growth and declared that “the American economy heads into 2006 with a full head of steam.”

Some of the pages that have been wrapped around our ornaments for a couple of years include a tattered half page from a Jan. 5, 2012 newspaper. One of the half stories on that page is about Alexander Gardner, a Civil War era photographer.

Gardner is credited with taking some of the Civil War’s most famous photos – photos of the Civil War battlefield at Antietam, stark pictures of the hanging of the Lincoln conspirators, and portraits of Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant and George McClellan.

The well-worn comics page from another 2012 issue features the antics of Garfield, Mother Goose and Grimm, Gasoline Alley, Blondie’s Dagwood and his boss, Mr. Dithers, Beetle Bailey and Charlie Brown.

On Dec. 3, 2008 a front page headline wondered “Do Weather Forecasters Really Have a Clue About This Winter?”  The answer: “Nope, Not This Year.”  So what’s new?, or in this instance, “What’s Old?”

A Trip Back in Time

I enjoy going to the jazz concerts hosted by the Jazz Appreciation Society of Syracuse (J.A.S.S.).  The musicians are usually familiar to the club’s members – Sunday it was the “Djug Django” group from Ithaca, well known for their Django Reinhardt arrangements. Reinhardt is often regarded as the greatest guitar player of all time.

Concert attendees are always happy to hear the band’s stylized renditions of old standards.

“Two Sleepy People” was written in 1938 by Hoagy Carmichael and Frank Loesser. It was recorded by Carmichael himself, Bing Crosby, Dean Martin and others and was performed in the film, “Thanks for the Memories,” by Bob Hope and Shirley Ross.

“Nagasaki” was a popular Tin Pan Alley hit written in 1928 by Harry Warren and Mort Dixon. The most famous rendition of the song at the time was by the Benny Goodman Quintet.

“Straighten Up and Fly Right” was written in 1943 by Nat King Cole and Irving Mills, performed by the King Cole Trio featuring some great lyrics by Cole – with a monkey telling a buzzard to “Straighten up and fly right, Cool down Papa, don’t blow your top.”

A Tribute to the “Emperor”!

The band also offered their versions of other favorites – “Brazil,” “Frankie and Johnny,” “Get That Jive, Jack,” “Creole Love Song” and “Take the A Train,” two Duke Ellington hits; “Sleepy Time Down South,” Louis Armstrong’s longtime theme song, ”Emperor Norton’s Hunch,” and a lot others.

“Emperor Norton’s Hunch” is one of my favorite traditional jazz songs. It is alive and peppy, a real rouser which tells a story through music of a real person.

The real person was Joshua Abraham Norton, an Englishman who came to San Francisco, accumulated a fortune, lost the fortune, left San Francisco; he returned to the city several years later a little bit “mentally unbalanced”, and claimed himself as the “Emperor of the United States”.

His “reign” over the city lasted 21 years; the city’s residents loved him and when the Emperor died in 1880, up to 30,000 of them lined the streets of the city in a two-mile funeral cortege to pay homage.

It’s all portrayed in this happy, peppy musical tribute without words – which even contains a chance for some audience participation.

It was a good time with good friends and good music.

Fulton’s snow

When I called John Florek at the Fulton Water Works on Tuesday to ask about snow figures, I told him that I had been calling him for facts and figures for many years.

“This is our 39th season of keeping track,” John said. “Sam Vescio was here in ’75-’76, and I came on for the ’76-’77 season.”  I knew that it had been a long time, but I’m not sure that I wanted to know exactly how long.

Getting back to this year, I was talking to John for the first time this winter, and quickly learned that as of Jan. 13, 75.8 inches of snow had been recorded at the Water Works.

He also told me that the normal amount for that date is 78.0 inches.  Well, I thought, we’re doing okay in that department.

Last year on the same date that total was 53.9 inches and the city finished up with a total snowfall amount of 206 inches. Oh, oh.

I knew from experience that once John starts talking about Fulton’s snowfall he doesn’t need a lot of encouragement to keep going. He talked along enough Tuesday to tell me that the lowest amount of snow Fulton had received by Jan. 13 during the years of record keeping was 15.25 inches in 2002. During 1996, the city had received 169.25 inches through that date.

So far, we seem to be doing okay, but   . . .  keep those shovels handy.

                                   . . . Roy Hodge 

Academic stars named at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School

Academic achievers at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School in Phoenix have been announced.

A Gold Star means the student earned an overall quarterly average of 90 or higher while Silver Star is awarded for an average between 85.0 and 89.99.

A failing grade or incomplete on the report card disqualifies a student from either award regardless of their average.

Grade 5 Gold Stars:

Isabella Allen, Shay Altman, Shayna Applebee, Christopher AuClair, Amaya Baker, Nicholas Bartlett, Ashleigh Besaw, Haley Bowersox, Natalie Brown, Sara Brunell, Kelsie Burgess, Chloe Calkins, Hannah Charleston, Emma Clark, Tabitha Clark, Alexander Coons, Sophia Crandall, Abigail Czyz,

Brielle DeRoberts and Alivia Eusepi.

Also: Hailey Fredericks, Francesca Goodell, Noah Gordon, Cierra Harvey, Mattison Hess, Braden Jolly, Amanda Justian, Lillyan Kingsbury, Nathan Kosakowski, Alivia Lamphere, Miranda LaRobardiere, Jock Li, Owen Lytle, Zack Mills, Robert Minard, Joslyn Mintonye, Garret Morrissiey, Kylie Mulcahey, Alex Olschewske and Kara Pierce.

Also: Andrew Quinn, Connor Roberts, Lily Roberts, William Semanchuk-Enser, Aiden Southworth, Isabella Stacy, Garrett Strang, Liam Sweeney, Benjamin Thibault, Corinne Thibault, Zoie Tracy, Melody Trask, Sophia Trinca, Aidan Trumble, Thomas Uhl, Mason Watkins,

Grade 5 Silver Stars:

Chase Altman, Zackary Byrne,  Cameron Cerul, Kolby Costello, Dylan DeBarth, Haylie Dodge, Alexis Dryer, Ethan Fox, Katherine Holbrook, Aliyah Ladd, Patricia Lamach, Jacob LaRocque, Tori-Lenn Loosen, Nicholas Merriett, Ariell Monaghan, Crystyna Morrison, Victoria O’Connor, Imari Piscitelli, Keaton Renfrew, Katrina Smith, Ashlyn Wallace, Carl Weller, Molly Werth, Jenasys Wood

Grade 6 Gold Stars:

Violet Ameele, Grace Arnold, Cade Bacon, Garrett Bowman, Mason Bresett, Matthew Doane, Elisabeth Dona, Camron Fordyce, Alexandra Galle, Caitlin George, Hailey Goudy, Allison Grabowski, Samuel Guthrie, Adam Hahn, Cassadee Handville, Samantha Harrison and Keera Hazen.

Also: Carly Ingerson, Laila Jones, Madison Kalt, Katelyn Kenner-Carbonaro, Jena Klimaszewski, Zaya Koegel, Lauren Kraft, Brigid Lawless, Anthony McCann, Savanah Neupert, Aubrianna Renfrew, Jillian Ricard, Vanessa Rivera, Leah Schlachter, McKenna Squier, Daniel St. Phillips, Tamika Stobart, Teresa Uhl, Nicholas Vaverchak, Grace Vestigo

Grade 6 Silver Stars:

Olivia Bigelow, Rachel Blake, Bryce Bobbett, Jadan Bruno, Brianna Buonagurio, Alexis Capenos, Danielle Case, Dominic Diaz, Michael Dion, Darren Fischel,  Andrew Hemingway, Haylie Homer, Brianna Horn, Paige Isabell, Natalie King, Julianna Lewis, Tina Li, Joshua Lovins, Chloe Lytle, Christian McKay and Caitlyn Mitchell.

Also: Joseph Murphy, Gregory Ojiem, Skyler Patnode, Taylor Petrie, Lilly Salotto, Briana Schreffler, Alan Seever, Ayden Slack, Jacob St. Laurent, Sarah Thorn, Nicole Tulowiecki, Madison Watkins

Grade 7 Gold Stars:

Annabelle Adams, Gabriella Allen, Kearra Backus, Maggie-Lee Basile, Marcus Berube, Cole Britton, Erika Brown, Gianna DeRoberts, Matthew Francis, Brianna Gates, Hannah Gilbert, Hans Goodnow and Johnna Harke.

Also: Xander Harrison, Declan Hawthorne, Kimber Hendrix, Megan Hess, Emilie Hilliard, Christian Johnson, Morgan Johnson, Ashley Kenner-Carbonaro, Jeffrey Lamach,Danielle LeFebvre, Wendy Li, Ashley Margrey and John Matzke V.

Also: Alayna Merrill, Makayla Newvine, Olivia Ripley, Kristine Rowe, Hannah Sallis, Mairin Sgroi, Mariah Sheirer, Joshua Smith, Crystal Stobart, Olivia Thrall, Joshua VanGorder, Garrett Watkins, Edward Zellar

Grade 7 Silver Stars:

Jason Alberici, Justin Alberici, Evan Baldini, Eric Betts, Madison Bird, Gage Breckenridge, Christopher Caltabiano, Abigail Clark, Alexandra Collins, Hannah Edwards, Allison Ernestine, Robert Fredericks, Kiersten Greenleaf, Bryon Halstead, Caroline Harrington, Courtney Holland, Ethan Hunt and Hunter Jewell.

Also: Trevor LaRobardiere, Taylor Mattice, Erin McArdell, Emmalie McIntyre, Riley Munger, Leo Murray Jr., Makenzie Nodine Jacob Palmatier, Dakota Palocy, Caytlyn Prikcett, Gabriel Rebensky, Hannah Root, Hannah Rounds, Alyssa Schafer, Payton Scruton, Gavin Trask, Natasha Zody, Mark Zogg

Grade 8 Gold Stars:

Dixon Ameele, Andrew Avery, Mikalah Bell, Jordan Cole, Hannah Grabowski, Morgan Gravlin, Natalie Hart, Zoe Heckert, Alexandra Hoag, Corinne Januszka, Nina Lewis, Megan Maestri, Emily McDonald, Breanna Mitchell, Ethan Murakami-Hamm, Catherine Musumeci, Bailey Otter, Lauren Schmidt, Alexis Smith, Brianna Squier, Haley Stellingwerf, Alisa Trudell, Kaitlin White, Leila Wooding, Julianne Yates

Grade 8 Silver Stars:

Mikayla Bailey, Scott Bell, Alexis Blackwell, John Blackwell Jr., David Burgess Jr., Christopher Cleary, Gabrielle Crandall, Julie Daubek, Mikayla Davis, Ryan Dolbear, Jonathan Downing, Devin Dubovik, Emily Forget, Becka Fuller, Dakotalee Gelling, Brandon Germain and Nathaniel Gill.

Also: Alyssa Goudy, Trinity Green, Bradlee Hess, Brittney Hunter, Matthew Johnson Jr., Gabriella Liberty, Jacob Marr,  Riley McCann, Paige McEwen, Frank Palmer, Lawrence Pilon, Cade Reed, Noah Scruton, Ryan Shafer, Alexander Sisera, Dana Stoutenger, Molly Thorn, Zachary Tulowiecki, Ben Vienneau, Jerrett Williams, Jordan Williams, Trevor Woren, Kolbey Young

 

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