Oswego Music Hall features blues, bluegrass and Americana Feb. 8

The Oswego Music Hall welcomes the always popular Philadelphia-based father and son duo, Beaucoup Blue, plus Carolann Solebello, perhaps most familiar to folk audiences as a founding member of the female trio Red Molly, to the hall at 8 p.m. Feb. 8.

Beaucoup Blue’s David and Adrian Mowry have wowed Oswego Music Hall audiences several times before. From blues to bluegrass, their soulful tradition and contemporary styles mesh into an innovative and authentic sound.

They pretty much cover the full range of “Americana” quite uniquely in their song writing and how they choose to represent classic material.

During their years together as a duo, they have received numerous awards, including “Grand Prize Winner of Billboard Magazine World Song-Writing Contest,” and the “Grand Prize Winner of the Terruride Blues & Brew Acoustic Competition.”  Their two soulful voices and slide guitar virtuosity are simply wonderful to behold in a live performance.

David and Adrian Mowry have been playing at top folk music venues for a long time. Last September, the album “Live at Caffé Lena: Music From America’s Legendary Coffeehouse, 1967 -2013” was released.

This piece of “Folk Music Heaven” includes songs by Beaucoup Blue from its 2008 concert at Lena, along with 60s greats like Pete Seeger and present day singers like Sara Lee Guthrie (Arlo’s daughter).

Carolann Solebello returned to solo performance in August 2010 after six years with the Red Molly band. She toured nationally and recorded three full-length CDs with that trio.

On her own, Carolann has recorded four CDs, including 2013’s Steel and Salt, and is carving out a rich and varied career as a singer-songwriter.

Carolann is the winner of the 2011 Susquehanna Music & Arts Festival Songwriting Competition, and was an Official Showcase Artist at Folk Alliance International and the Northeast Regional Folk Alliance in 2012.

A New York City native, Carolann first fell in love with mountain music – and the bluegrass and country that grew out of that tradition – while working as an actor in East Tennessee and Kansas. Tunes and techniques she learned from musicians in both places fundamentally changed her approach to songwriting and guitar playing, and subsequently colored her work with Red Molly.

The venue is the McCrobie Civic Center, 41 Lake Street, Oswego. Desserts, snacks, popcorn and beverages are available for purchase. Tickets can be purchased online at http://oswegomusichall.org/ or at the River’s End bookstore, 19 W. Bridge St., Oswego.  Holders of tickets purchased before 1 p.m. the day of the concert will have preferred seating.  After 1 p.m., seating is general admission. Tickets are $14 if purchased in advance and $16 at the door.   Children 12 and under are half-price; under 5 is free.

The Music Hall’s next concert Feb. 22 will feature  “Percussion Wizard” Jeff Haynes & Co., including guitarist Sean Harkness and singer-songwriter Casey Erdmann.

Oswego Opera Theater presents Rigoletto — The Oswego Story

The Oswego Opera Theater will present Rigoletto – The Oswego Story, Feb. 21 and 23 at SUNY Oswego’s Waterman Theatre in Tyler Hall.

The Feb. 21 performance is at 7:30 p.m. and the Feb. 23 show is at 2 p.m.

In Guiseppe Verdi’s first true masterpiece, Rigoletto, the original setting is Mantua, Italy in the 16th Century, where the main characters are the Duke of Mantua (chauvinist and all-around bad boy), his court jester Rigoletto, the jester’s angelic daughter (way too innocent and naïve), an assassin for hire and his sister.

Rigoletto has been a favorite with audiences all over the world since it first hit the stage in 1851.

Now, reimagined by Oswego Opera Theater Artistic Director Mack Richardson, Rigoletto – The Oswego Story plots Duke, the personally and politically “connected” owner of a Prohibition-era speak-easy in Oswego.

He is a notorious womanizer, and for fun disguises himself as a poor SUNY Oswego student to romance the college girls.

Tickets are $25 for regular price admission, $20 for seniors and faculty/staff of all educational institutions in the region, and $5 for all students. Tickets are available at the SUNY Oswego Box Office at  312-2141 or online at tickets.edu.

For more information on the event, sponsor information, and/or the Oswego Opera Theater please call (315) 638-0674 or visit Facebook: Oswego Opera Theater Events; www.oswegoopera.org; or email OswegoOpera@gmail.com.

Senior citizen news

Granby Center Senior News

Our meeting for the New Year was very good. We had 46 members at the Jan. 16 get-together. Seemed good to see so many of our seniors.

Cards made by Nancy were won by Jeanette Pauldine. The 50/50 was won by Jeanne Smith.

Kitchen committee for Feb. 6 is John Krupa, Jean Cronk, Ruth and Bob Sheldon and Imo Lefort. For Feb. 20, the kitchen committee is Fran Wadas, Donna Babcock, Joanne Gardner and Imo LeFort.

We had a very good speaker — Rachel Baglia from Oswego Health. She was very informative about blood pressure and hypertension.

Trips were discussed by Joanne Gardner.

Submitted by E. Martin

Volney Seniors

Early on Dec. 4, the roads were covered with ice. It warmed up and like magic, the ice was gone. We had many seniors make it to the meeting.

Fifty-seven of us made it to our Thanksgiving dinner at Bristol Hill Church. The meal was so good.

Our new member is Barbara Wallace. Welcome aboard.

Birthdays — Therisa Caltbiano, Gordon Smith, Roy Crouch and Denise Munger. We wish you all many more healthy, happy ones.

A 57th anniversary is being celebrated by Charlie and Rita Murphy. Congratulations.

On Dec. 14, we had our Christmas dinner at Seneca Hill. It was so beautiful with the big Christmas tree all decorated. I always try to sit at a table where I can look at the tree and enjoy it all the time we’re there.

The 50/50 winner for November was Mary Sugar and for December it was Mary Lalanga.

Submitted by Alma Bowering

 Phoenix Senior Citizens Club

At the club’s annual Christmas Party Dec. 13, the newly elected officers were installed by installing officer Arlene Slaski.

Trip Coordinator Martha Arnold announced that in February we will be carpooling to Heid’s in Liverpool for their famous hot dogs and coneys. She asked everyone to save the 2 for 1 coupons that are featured in the newspapers.

Cars will leave the town building at 10:30 a.m. People can drive ahead and meet the others at Heid’s if they choose.

We had a pot luck covered dish birthday and anniversary celebration Jan. 10.

The next business meeting for the Phoenix Senior Citizens club of the Town of Schroeppel is at 1:30 p.m. Friday Feb. 7 at the town of Schroeppel building on Route 57A.

If Phoenix schools are closed that day, there will be no meeting or covered dish dinner that day.

The next pot luck covered dish birthday and anniversary celebration dinner is at 1:30 p.m. Friday Feb. 14. Bring a dish to pass and your own table service. Coffee, tea, hot chocolate and lemonade are provided.

The senior club is always looking for new members age 50 and over to join. Dues are $5 per year and can be paid to Treasurer Peggy Sayles at any meeting or dinner. For more information, call President Joanne Czajkowski at 622-1239.

H. Lewis Lower, owned Lower’s Insurance

H. Lewis Lower, 75, of Oswego, died Jan. 10, 2014 in Crouse Hospital, Syracuse.

He was born in Fulton, the son of the late Lewis and Christabelle Lower.

He owned and operated Lower’s Insurance in Oswego.

He is survived by his daughter, Leslie Chase of CA.

A gathering will be held Sunday Jan. 26, 2014 at Bridie Manor from 1 to 2 p.m.

Arrangements are in the care of the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, 147 W. Fourth. St., Oswego.

Paul N. Schremp, worked at Black Clawson

Paul N. Schremp, 57, of Fulton, died Tuesday, Jan. 21.

Paul was an Army veterans and worked at Black Clawson in Fulton for the past six years.

Survivors include his wife, the former Darlene Rupert Schremp; a son Ryan Schremp; two daughters, Jennifer (Drew) Williams and Kayla (Dylen) Walker; his mother, Elizabeth Schremp; four brothers, Mike (Liz) Schremp, Ray (Connie) Schremp, Jerry (Shirley) Schremp and Mark (Lisa) Schremp; two sisters, Rita (Marty) Higgins and Terrye (Tom) Plonka; four grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday Jan. 25 (Today) at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton. Calling hours were Friday Jan. 24 in the atrium of Holy Trinity.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Harter Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Margaret A. Beckwith, longtime athletic booster

Margaret A. Beckwith, 79, of Fulton, passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her loving family Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014 after a long illness.

She was born in Fulton, NY to the late Anthony and Elizabeth White.

Mrs. Beckwith was a graduate of G. Ray Bodley High School and a lifelong resident of Fulton. She retired from Niagara Mohawk after more than 40 years of service.

Mrs. Beckwith was an active volunteer and member of the Fulton Athletic Booster Club for many years and served as treasurer for 25 of those years.  Margaret received many accolades as both an athlete and avid sports fan.

However, one of her proudest and honored achievements was being recognized with a scholarship named in her honor for the senior female student athlete of the year.

Margaret’s greatest passion was the love she had for her family, friends and beloved Yankees. She was a permanent fixture at most sporting events, but none more so than her own grandchildren from whom she would watch with pride and admiration.

Mrs. Beckwith was pre-deceased by her husband of 46 years George W. Beckwith in 2011, and her siblings, Henry, Ralph, Janette, Joseph, Fred and Edie.

She is survived by her loving family George (Christine) Beckwith of Fulton, and Bill (Sue) Beckwith of Fulton and much-loved grandchildren Megan, Courtney, Austin, Callie and Evan, and several nieces and nephews.

There will be a spring burial in St. Mary’s Cemetery with a graveside service. A gathering for family and friends will follow the cemetery service in the spring.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Margaret’s name to the Fulton Athletic Boosters Club, C/O Daniel Shue, 31 Aspen Cove Lane, Fulton, NY 13069.

The Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S., Fulton, has care of the arrangements.

Charlene (Ross) Weldin, accomplished seamstress

Charlene (Ross) Weldin, 76, of Oswego, passed away peacefully at home under the loving care of her daughters.

She was born Jan. 5, 1938 to the late Charles and Florence Hunt, and was a life resident of Oswego.

Charlene worked at various jobs throughout her life, including Singer’s, Cahill’s Fish Market and Tops. Charlene was an accomplished seamstress, and enjoyed her pets and camping with her husband George at Black River Bay Campground.

She was predeceased by her first husband, Robert Ross; her brother, Lyons Hunt; and son-in-law Greg Thomas.

Mrs. Weldin is survived by her husband George Weldin; daughters Florence Ross of Oswego, Cynthia (Mark) Masuicca of Oswego; her sister Joan (David) McCann; grandchildren Karolyn Thomas, Kassidy (Jeremy) Pekarek, Sarah Thomas, Ross Thomas, Angela Thomas; and four great grandchildren.

All who knew Charlene enjoyed her talent to make them smile.

A celebration of Charlene’s life will be held Saturday Jan. 25, 2014 (todaay) at Vona’s Restaurant, Oswego from 1 to 4 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Syracuse Ronald McDonald House.

The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, 147 W. Fourth St., Oswego.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

No Business Like Snow Business

The first time I mentioned the fateful “S” word in this space was in my third column when the short article was about Fulton’s first winter festival.

“Hey Dad, I went down and signed up for the snow sculpturing contest; it will be fun.”

That’s how the Saturday afternoon adventure started. The family members were gathered together in our front yard at the beginning.  Then, the chief adviser had to leave to do her grocery shopping.

There were a couple of mysterious disappearances, and some shouted directions from inside the window; finally, the fearless leader was alone in the front yard with a 20-foot-long hunk of ice cleverly disguised as a vicious dragon generously slathered with green food coloring.

And then the proud declaration the next day:  “Hey Dad, I won.”

In January, 1980 I wrote about the arrival of winter – “I knew winter weather had finally arrived in Fulton last week when everybody in our household was frantically looking for mittens, boots, snow pants, scarves, etc. . . . and when someone said, How many days until spring?”

“There’s No School Today!”

Adam was worrying about snow days in 1981.

“Since it was snowing hard when we went to bed, I shouldn’t have been surprised by the knock on the bedroom door in the morning.

“Mom, Dad, guess what, there’s no school today.”

There were columns about cross country skiing and neighbor Matt MacDowell, snow blower doctor.  It was Matt’s skillful touch which brought our faithful friend back to life from impending doom time after time.

During ensuing winters, I wrote about how winter weather causes us to reminisce about the hot days of last summer and last year’s vacation; and how some of us brag about our winters: “Our schools are allotted five ‘snow days’ a year but we didn’t use them because we ‘only’ got 200 inches of snow.”

In one column, I was trying to explain what a blizzard was, and in another I was talking about the winters I enjoyed as a kid: “When we were kids we used to think that Syracuse had more snow than other place in the world.”

Years later, living in Fulton certainly changed my mind about that.

Another year I admitted that I was never ready for winter, and the next year I was wondering whether the stormy weather we were getting should or shouldn’t be called a blizzard.

Winter Questions

In February, 1993, I was pondering many questions I had been asked: “Enough snow for you?”, Do you think it will ever stop snowing?”, “Where are we going to put all this snow?”, “How much snow have we got?” “Is there school today?”

And on and on.

As the years went on, I felt like a refugee of winter: “My car doesn’t have one of those electronic voices but if it did I know it would be telling me to ‘Go back inside stupid, it’s 20 degrees below zero out here.’”

I thought I would feel better if I reviewed the “Blizzard of ’66,” and every year I called John Florek at the water works and talked about the city’s depressing snow figures.

As the century turned I was exclaiming. “My car, it’s back, out there on the deck. What I was looking at was our outside cooker with a pile of snow on it.

The cooker itself was the body of the car, the shelf next to it was the hood. There were two little round piles that resembled wheels.  The cooker sits out there all year long and it’s a cooker; we get six inches of snow and it becomes a car.”

251 Inches; Then, “Unsnowiest” Winter

It was March 10, 2001 and Fulton had received 251 inches of snow for the 2000-2001 snow season.

When I called John Florek in January, 2002 he said it had been the “unsnowiest” winter since records had been kept in Fulton.  The city ended up with a total of 100.5 inches of snow that year.

In February 2007, I wrote that Fulton schools were closed for the fourth time in five days.  In January 2009 I was reminded that people in my family, who were farmers, used to say that a year of heavy snow would be a good year later on.

The official proverb puts it this way: “A year of snow, a year of plenty.”

In January 2010, I was telling readers that the first patents for snow plows were issued in the 1840s.  On Feb. 12, 2011, I noted some of us like to see snow in December, not so much in January, a little less in February, and don’t want to hear the word in March.

Monday, Jan. 30, 2012: While I was out in our driveway in Syracuse clearing away 3 inches of light snow, Jeff was in Fulton working on moving 3 feet of a new snowfall around.

A year ago, on Jan. 5, 2013, I was thinking about the winter days my friends and I spent at the dump – the natural in- the-backyards hill at the end of our street – with lots of roller coaster-like bumps and jumps.

Now, it’s January, 2014 – I am supposed to be taking our Christmas tree down, but I’m looking out the window at the 3 or 4 inches of new snow we have received here in Syracuse.

“It’s probably 2 to 3 feet in Fulton,” I thought.

Addendum:  Sometimes I have written about winter and snow at least as early as October – maybe September.

Oct. 6, 1981: After I stumble over the snow tires out in the garage for the fourth or fifth time, I figure that someone thinks it’s time to put them on the car. . . and when the windshield scraper finds its way out of the depth of the trunk, or wherever it has been, the end is really near.

My mind is remembering a Fulton snow storm in March of 1993, after which I was too busy shoveling snow to write a column.

But, after all, it was most likely “just another day” in Fulton’s winter story. The storm that I am remembering happened on Jeff’s birthday; the two of us spent the day shoveling snow.

Happy birthday, Jeff!

. . . Roy Hodge 

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