Granby students learn about bucket-filling

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Students at Granby Elementary School in Fulton have made friends with a BFF — a Bucket Filling Fairy.

A BFF and a colorful cast of characters made a stop at the school last week to perform the character-building play “Have You Filled a Bucket Today.”

The play is based on Carol McCloud’s award-winning book “Have You Filled a Bucket Today,” which introduces young readers to the concepts of bucket-filling and bucket-dipping.

The play, like the book, is a modern twist to the golden rule — “Treat others the way you want to be treated” — using the idea of invisible buckets to reinforce how saying and doing nice things creates happiness and “fills” a person’s bucket.

Doing or saying hurtful things can “dip” into a person’s bucket and leave a person feeling sad.

The play’s characters acted out a variety of skits to illustrate the difference between bucket filling and bucket dipping at school, at home, in cyberspace and on the school bus.

Through humor and audience interaction with a rhyming and high-energy BFF, the students became empowered to fill buckets and pay kindness and respect forward to others.

Cold weather comes in handy for Oswego County BOCES students

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Oswego County BOCES Exceptional Education teacher Mary Ryan has been making the most out of the cold weather by conducting science experiments with her students.

After learning about the physical properties of water, and seeing a video on Reddit.com on how hot water freezes faster than cold water, Ryan’s class tested the theory.

When boiling water is tossed in the air, it creates a larger surface area, which then turns the water to cool droplets.

In extremely cold temperatures, these droplets freeze, and turn the boiling water into a cloud of ice crystals midair.

Sure enough, when the boiling water was tossed into the air, the water turned instantly into what looked like mist.

Students were able to see for themselves how hot water changes from a liquid to a solid as soon as it comes into contact with cold air.

Students have also been learning about air pressure, and conducted their own experiment using a Styrofoam cup.

When a Styrofoam cup is filled with water, and an index card is placed over the rim, the cup can be flipped upside down without water flowing out.

This is because the air pressure inside the cup keeps the index card in place.

Once the index card is removed, a force is felt as the air pushes the water from the cup.

Oswego hires new transportation director

A new Oswego City School District Transportation Supervisor was appointed during the special Jan. 27 meeting of the board of education.

Johnnie Pierce will commence his duties on March 3 with a salary of $74,000.

Currently he is serving as the Transportation Supervisor of the Genesee Valley Central School District and previously held transportation positions at Lyme and Morristown Central School Districts.

He also worked for Laidlaw Transportation in servicing the Indian River Central School District.

Pierce is a U.S. Army veteran who was stationed at Fort Drum where he was a heavy wheeled vehicle mechanic.

He replaced William Myer who left the position at the end of 2013.

The board also decided intramurals will return to the five elementary schools in the district as funding was approved for intramural supervisors.

The programs will consist of intramurals two days per week.

The board also appointed an audit committee for the remainder of the current school year.

The Oswego school board finance committee members, Kathleen Allen, John Dunsmoor and Samuel Tripp, will serve as the audit committee.

Also approved during the special meeting was the appointment of Dennis Pawlikowski as a modified assistant wrestling coach and the contract for an AmeriCorps member in the amount of $845 for Frederick Leighton Elementary School.

The next meeting for the board of education will be on Wednesday, Feb. 12, at 5 p.m. for the committee meetings.

This session will be conducted in the Oswego High School Anthony J. Murabito Media Center and is an opportunity for community feedback for resolutions that could be placed on the Feb. 25 regular meeting agenda.

Tickets available for St. Luke “Bundle of Bucks” raffle

Tickets for the 10th annual St. Luke “Bundle of Bucks” Charity Raffle are on sale and now is the time to buy one to be part of the upcoming “Early Bird” drawing.

Everyone who purchases a “Bundle of Bucks” charity raffle ticket before Feb. 14 is entered in the “Early Bird” drawing when five – $100 prize winners will be selected from current raffle ticket holders.

“Bundle of Bucks” Raffle cash prizes totaling $25,000 will be paid out when the 1,000 tickets are sold by the time of the drawing on May 31.

If you already have your raffle ticket applications, send them in today. Raffle ticket applications are also available by calling St. Luke Health Services at 342-3166.

Ticket applications are online and can be downloaded at stlukehs.com. Or stop in at St. Luke Health Services, St. Francis Commons and Bishop’s Commons in Oswego or Michaud Health Services in Fulton and purchase tickets directly.

The entry fee for the raffle is $50 per ticket; only 1,000 tickets will be sold. The raffle features 15 cash prizes to be awarded with a top prize of $10,000.

Every raffle ticket is eligible for all of the cash prize drawings. Tickets can be purchased individually or consider purchasing a “group ticket” with family members, co-workers or friends.

Proceeds from the “Bundle of Bucks” Raffle benefit the St. Luke–John Foster Burden Fund, which provides resources for programs to help those served by the affiliate nonprofit community-based organizations comprising The St. Luke Family of Caring (St. Luke Health Services, Bishop’s Commons Enriched Living Residence, Michaud Residential Health Services and St. Francis Commons Assisted Living Residence).

Each raffle ticket admits two adults to the “Bundle of Bucks” Raffle Drawing Party from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 31 at the Elks Lodge in Oswego. The raffle drawing event features free food, beverages, live entertainment, games and prize drawings. You must be 18 years or older to participate.

You do not have to be present at the raffle drawing to win. For more information, call 342-3166.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

John and Mary

Just in case you were wondering, John was the most popular male baby’s name 100 years ago, in 1914.

Also in the top 10 were William, James, Robert, Joseph, George, Charles, Edward, Frank and Walter.

One hundred years ago, Mary topped the list as the top female baby name followed by Helen, Dorothy, Margaret, Ruth, Anna, Mildred, Elizabeth, Frances and Marie.

As expected, that has changed a lot during the past 100 years. While most of those names are still around, only two remain among the most popular boys’ names.

The most popular names for baby boys 100 years later are Liam, Noah, Ethan, Mason, Arden, Elijah, David, Jacob, Jackson and Lucas. During the past 100 years, John has slipped from first to 39th, and William is now the 11th most popular boys’ name.

The most popular girls’ names in 2014 are Olivia, Emma, Ava, Sophia, Mae, Isabella, Amelia, Charlotte, Lily and Ella.  The only female baby name from 1914s top 10 included among the 2014 top 40 names is Anna at 36.

I was curious to see what names may have been popular when I was going to elementary school in the 40s. According to the Social Security website, the most popular boys’ names during that period were James, Robert and John – not too different from 1914 when those names were third, fourth and first.

Other familiar 40’s names were William, Richard, David, Charles, Thomas, Michael and Ronald.

Mary was still the most favored baby girls’ name during the 1940s, followed by Linda, Barbara, Patricia, Carol, Sandra, Nancy, Sharon, Judith and Susan.

Come to think of it, I did have girlfriends named Barbara and Patricia, and two of my girl cousins were Carol and Sandra.

My own name, LeRoy, was further down on the 40s list at number 89. It was spelled with a small r and most likely pronounced differently than my mother’s preference. The nickname I have always preferred, Roy, was at number 43.

As for the lowest of the low during the 40s: For the boys, Fredrick, Jonathan,  Kent, Wendell and Bennie were at the bottom – and on the girls’ side, Stella, Rosie, Patty, Veronica and Michele.

I discovered that some of my canine friends during those years had made the popular human names list – Jake, Fritz and Rudy. I haven’t found Bruno yet.

Or Is It a Sit-down?

I found this among a collection of columns I have written: Hodgepodge, March 4, 1980:

America has a hang-up . . . or is it a sit-down?

We seem to be hung up with, as the sophisticated French say – la derriere; or in crude Americanese – the fanny.

Let’s get to the bottom of this.

Television is full of rearview action.  Charlie’s Angels probably started it; Underalls commercials followed close behind, and how about those jeans with their famous back pocket?

Baby’s bottoms are not exempt with another popular commercial constantly pointing out which is the driest.

The rear-end exposure syndrome, known to those in the know as “mooning,” reared its behind close to home last fall as some Hannibal cheerleaders were caught in the act.  A similar problem with a busload of Buffalo area soccer players was reported recently.

Last week, a Moline, Ill. secretary sought posterity for her posterior as she attempted to take a photograph while sitting on her company’s new copying equipment. Appropriately enough, she was canned.

Sports figures are guilty, too. A great football or basketball play is often acknowledged by a teammate with a friendly pat – and not on the back.

It’s time for a change. We must all get behind the revolution. No more waiting for the bottom to drop out of the market; no more come from behind wins in sports, or betting your bottom dollar; no more rear admirals or rump roasts, and Fanny Farmer will just have to change her name.

That’s the bottom line.

It’s February

February, as the second month of the year, is the shortest – it has 28 days – 29 in leap year.

There are two accepted pronunciations of the month, which are considered standard and correct. February may be more often pronounced Febuary, as in January and Febuary, but the seemingly preferred pronunciation is Feb-ru-ary.

There are several important days worth observing, in some cases celebrating, in February.

Candlemas Day, on Feb. 2, is a feast day commemorating the presentation of Christ in the temple.  Feb. 2 is also observed as Groundhog Day.

The accepted belief is that if a groundhog emerges from his burrow on this day and sees his shadow, there will be six more weeks of winter.

Feb. 12 is Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, Feb. 22 is George Washington’s birthday, and Presidents Day (officially observed as Washington’s birthday, on the third Monday of the month since 1971) is popularly recognized as honoring Washington and Lincoln. The day is also sometimes observed as a celebration of the lives of all U.S. presidents.

Feb. 14 is St. Valentine’s Day – a day for the exchange of tokens of affection.

Well-known persons born in February include Lisa Marie Presley, Farrah Fawcett, Tom Smothers, Hank Aaron, Natalie Cole, Garth Brooks, Robert Griffin III, Bill Russell, Florence Henderson, Michael Jordan, Vanna White, Sidney Poitier, Charles Barkley, Steven Jobs, Elizabeth Taylor and celebrating every four years on Feb. 29 – Dinah Shore and Jimmy Dorsey.

When I was in elementary school, students thought February was a great month and that Abraham Lincoln and George Washington were our greatest presidents because we had both of their birthdays off from school during the short month of February.

Happy February.

. . . Roy Hodge

Emergency Management Drill to be held Wednesday afternoon at Fulton Junior High

The Fulton Junior High School, as part of the School District’s half-day Collaboration Day Program, will conduct an Emergency Management Plan drill on the afternoon of Wednesday, Jan. 29.

This is part of the Fulton City School District’s ongoing planning and practice of their Emergency Management Plan.

The drill is done in cooperation with the Fulton Police Department.

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