Oswego Reading Initiative chooses book for its ‘summer read’

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

The Oswego Reading Initiative at SUNY Oswego has chosen 2012 National Book Award-winning “The Round House” — Louise Erdrich’s “haunting, powerful” novel about a Native American boy’s search for justice for his mother — as this year’s summer read for the incoming class and the rest of campus and community members who wish to participate.

“Using the quiet, reflective voice of a young boy forced into an early adulthood following a brutal assault on his mother, Erdrich has created an intricately layered novel that not only untangles our nation’s history of moral and judicial failure, but also offers a portrait of a community sustained by its traditions, values, faith and stories,” the award citation reads.

This is ORI’s 13th annual book selection, among them last year’s “The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl.” To accompany the selection, faculty are encouraged to integrate the book into the curriculum and a series of programs, including cultural events and talks, are planned to facilitate discussion and involvement around the title.

SUNY Oswego anthropology faculty member Kevin White, who specializes in American studies and has familial ties to the Mohawks, expressed excitement with the choice.

“With a gripping narrative, Erdrich crafts a story filled with human emotion, legal questions and violence against Native American women in a coming-of age-story with all too common repercussions and outcomes among native women and communities,” White said.

“Far too often these issues are not known to the American public, and Native American women, families and communities must deal with these issues as best as they can,” he said.

Search for justice

ORI rarely chooses so-called coming-of-age books, because first-year college students often have read them already, said Associate Provost Rameen Mohammadi, chair of the committee.

Yet “The Round House” is far more nuanced than many others and illuminates Ojibwe life and longstanding Native American concerns, among them jurisdictional issues that most Americans rarely hear about and don’t understand, he said.

The committee “goes through a pretty rigorous process,” Mohammadi said. “We survey the campus and do a lot of reading and discussing. As we’ve done in the past, the committee believes this book has enough connections to the curriculum that many faculty would feel comfortable bringing it in to their plans.”

He called the New York Times bestseller — which some reviewers called “a Native American ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’” — fascinating and revealing of what life would be like on a reservation, in this case an Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota.

The novel recounts the story of 13-year-old Joe, who grows frustrated with the official investigation of the beating and rape of his mother, Geraldine Coutts, who was left traumatized and reluctant to relive what happened.

Joe sets out to find answers on his own, with his friends Cappy, Zack and Angus.

Mohammadi said the book’s twists, intrigue and unique voice should hold readers to the end, ready to discuss the text in classes and events. He said the committee reached out to Erdrich, but learned that the novelist is not traveling and does not plan to appear on campus as some past ORI authors have done.

Erdrich, whose heritage is Ojibwe as a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of the Chippewa, has written 14 novels, including the bestseller and Pulitzer Prize finalist “The Plague of Doves,” as well as volumes of poetry and short stories and a memoir of early motherhood.

Some of her other novels from Harper Collins are “The Bingo Palace,” “The Beet Queen” and “Four Souls.”

Fulton YMCA Speed Demons take on Norwich and Oneonta

The Fulton YMCA Speed Demons recently competed against Norwich and Oneonta.

Speed Demon swimmers continue to work hard in the pool and had many first-place finishes against Norwich.

Grace Trepasso and Mallory Curtis were two of five Fulton swimmers competing in the 20-lap 500 Free event, both taking time off their previous marks and finishing first in their class.

Alisa Trudell had the biggest drop in the meet, crushing her best time in the 200 Free by 32 seconds and also improving in her 100 Free and 100 Back.

Ella Henderson grabbed first in the 200 Free and 50 Fly while Dawson Curtis brought home top honors in the 50 Breast.

Teammates achieving personal best swim times against Norwich were:

Kendall Williamson (50 Free)

Cameron Warren (100 Free, 50 Back)

David Tallents (50 Free, 100 Free)

Hayden Williamson (200 IM, 50 Back, 50 Breast)

Against Oneonta, Fulton showed strength in the Individual Medley (IM) at all levels.

Some first-place honors were won by Lane Rawls, Alisa Trudell, Airyona Croci and Christina Tallents.

Kaitlyn Trudell took an impressive 10 seconds off her 200 IM time. Dakota Stoutenger improved his 200 Free, finishing first.

Luvlee Croci showed the 50 Fly is her strength, finishing first. In the 20-lap 500 Free, Sage Hourihan displayed endurance, finishing under the 7-minute mark by shaving off an astounding 35 seconds.

Brooke Halstead swam personal best times in her 100 Free and 100 Back as did Emily Grant in her three events (100 IM, 100 Free, 50 Breast).

Phoenix girls’ varsity basketball ends season

By Rob Tetro

The Phoenix girls’ varsity basketball team lost its last 2 games of the season, finishing with a record of 2-16.

On Feb. 5, Bishop Grimes rolled past Phoenix, 76-30, while Marcellus knocked off the Lady Firebirds, 52-36 on Feb. 11.

The game against Bishop Grimes was never much of a contest, with Grimes  wasting little time putting the game out of reach.

They jumped out to a 20 point lead over the Lady Firebirds during the first quarter and then continued their dominance during the second quarter to lead 39-14 at the half.

In the third, the Cobras outscored the Lady Firebirds by 14 points to push the lead to 39 points. Bishop Grimes capped off an impressive effort during the fourth quarter, outscoring Phoenix by 7 points en route to a 76-30 win.

Leading the way for the Lady Firebirds was Samantha Doupe with 11 points, fllowed by Alexandra Wilson with 9 and Shannon Dolan scored 8.

Marcellus built a 6-point lead over the Lady Firebirds during the first quarter of their game and outscored Phoenix by only 2 points in the second to post a 27-19 halftime score.

But Marcellus put the game out of reach during the third quarter, outscoring Phoenix by 10 points to extend its lead to 18 points.

However, the Lady Firebirds played until the clock hit all zeros. They battled through the fourth quarter while outscoring Marcellus by 2 points. But the lead Marcellus had was too much to overcome as Marcellus came away with a 52-36 win.

The Lady Firebirds were led by Kimberly Holbrook with 9 points, followed by Alexandra Wilson and Shannon Dolan with 8 points each, Jolene Zaia scored 5 and Samantha Doupe added 4 points.

New York B.A.S.S. Nation wins conservation award

New York B.A.S.S. Nation has won the 2013 Berkley Conservation Award.

The Berkley Conservation Institute  announced the award, worth $2,000 in cash, Monday and will present it at the B.A.S.S. Conservation Awards banquet Feb. 22 in Birmingham during the 2014 Bassmaster Classic.

“The New York B.A.S.S. Nation is a role-model for other organizations to follow,” said Jim Martin, Berkley Conservaton Institute Conservation Director.

“Their members are making a difference. They have a great plan, are organized and dedicated. The Ramp Monkeys concept is something that every state B.A.S.S. Nation should emulate,” he said.

:Getting youth involved in conservation efforts is vital to the future of our aquatic resources. I salute the New York B.A.S.S. Nation for their commitment to the principles that the Berkley Conservation Institute holds dear,” Martin said.

In winning the Conservation Award, the New York B.A.S.S. Nation took a multi-pronged approach to battling invasive species in the Empire State.

State Conservation Director Barb Elliott worked with New York B.A.S.S. Nation youth clubs to form “Ramp Monkeys.” These groups attend area bass tournaments and first remove plant debris from launch areas, then as anglers pull their rigs out, the Ramp Monkeys use kid-power to “Clean, Drain and Dry” each boat and trailer.

The operation is an opportunity for outreach to anglers and boaters and an educational experience for the youth members.

The New York B.A.S.S. Nation members also continued to battle invasive water chestnuts by physically removing the plants from lakes, canals and rivers and worked with state agencies, lake associations, universities and watershed alliances to distribute educational/outreach materials to increase awareness of invasive species.

“The New York B.A.S.S. Nation is honored to receive this award,” said President Fred Blom. “I am proud of the accomplishments of the whole organization. We are all working hard to make a difference.”

Berkley Conservation Institute is a division of the Pure Fishing Co., the world’s largest tackle company headquartered in Columbia, SC.

The brand names of Pure Fishing include Abu Garcia, All Star Rods, Berkley, Fenwick, Mitchell, Penn, Pflueger, Shakespeare, Spiderwire and Stren.

NYS offering lifetime licenses for hunting, fishing, visiting NY parks

The state last week introduced the New York State Adventure License Series, providing New Yorkers and visitors the opportunity to purchase lifetime licenses to fish, hunt and visit New York State Parks.

The state also unveiled New York’s Outdoor Adventure License Plates, which features nine new plate designs – including the I [love] NY HUNTING, I [love] NY FISHING, and I [love] NY PARKS license plates – available for free exclusively to those buying new lifetime hunting, fishing, or parks licenses in 2014.

In addition, New York residents who secure lifetime licenses will have the opportunity to receive an Adventure License, which allows them the option of consolidating all their recreation licenses and benefits onto their New York State Driver’s License, an initiative first introduced by Gov. Andrew Cuomo during his State of the State address last month.

The Adventure License and plates are available on the state’s revamped online licensing portal: http://licensecenter.ny.gov/nys-adventure-license.

To promote these latest offers, the state will launch a direct mail campaign and send one million letters to notify current short term recreational license holders.

Phoenix boys’ varsity hoops makes Section 3 playoffs

By Rob Tetro

The Phoenix boys’ varsity basketball team won 2 out of its last 3 games to conclude the regular season with an overall record of 11-7 and a chance to go to the Section 3 playoffs.

On Feb. 6, Phoenix held off Cazenovia, 57-55. The Firebirds cruised past Bishop Grimes, 60-46 on Feb. 7. Marcellus spoiled the last game of the regular season, knocking off Phoenix, 60-51 on Feb. 11.

Last weekend, Phoenix played Skaneateles in the opening round of The Class B, Section 3 Playoffs. Be sure to check out Saturday’s edition to see how The Firebirds fared.

Phoenix jumped out to a 4-point lead over Cazenovia during the first quarter, but Caz quickly cut into the deficit and Phoenix held onto a slim 2-pint lead (30-28) at the half.

The Firebirds expanded on their lead during the third quarter, outscoring the Lakers by 11 points to expand the lead to 13 points. Cazenovia made things interesting during the fourth quarter, outscoring Phoenix by 11. Caz continued to battle, but Phoenix held on for a 2-point win.

The Firebirds were led by Dylan Doupe with 20 points, followed by Connor Haney with 11, Bryce Plante and Brian Sawyer scored 9 points each and Zach Sisera added 8 points.

The Firebirds jumped out to a 6-point lead over Bishop Grimes during the first quarter of their game and then Phoenix blew the game wide open during the second quarter, outscoring the Cobras by 12 points to take a 35-17 halftime lead.

Bishop Grimes battled back during the second half and cut the lead to just 16 points in the third quarter and continued to cut into the lead in the fourth, but the Phoenix lead was too much for them as Bishop Grimes succumbed to the Firebirds by 14 points.

Leading the way for Phoenix was Dylan Doupe with 20 points, followed by Brian Sawyer with 12, Connor Haney with 11  and Zach Sisera chipped in 6 points.

The Firebirds wasted little time getting in gear in the Marcellus game, building a 7-point lead in the first quarter. Then Marcellus quickly began to battle back. Despite being outscored during the second quarter, Phoenix took a 30-24 lead into halftime.

Marcellus continued to cut into the Firebirds lead during the third quarter, outscoring Phoenix by 5 points to come within a point at 41-40. Marcellus’ momentum carried over into the fourth quarter as they outscored the Firebirds by 10 points en route to a 60-51 win.

Phoenix was led by Dylan Doupe with 17 points, followed by Brian Sawyer with 11, Bryce Plante and Zach Sisera with 8 points each and Walker Connoly added 3 points.

Bodley Bulletins, by Julia Ludington

I hope everyone is enjoying their week off from school.

The Student Senate, FBLA, French Club and Hope Club have all decided to extend the deadline for canned goods collection to Feb. 28.

If you have not already brought in any non-perishable items, or if you would like to bring in more, please plan to when we get back to school. It is for a great cause.

Some teachers are offering incentives for bringing in cans, so make sure to participate. Don’t forget that the Guided Study Hall that collects the most will win a breakfast.

Our FBLA team had a very successful competition recently. The club brought home 12 awards in total. Two first-place awards were won by two of our exchange students, and two other Bodley students also brought home first-place awards.

Our FBLA club always does very well, and we are very proud. Some students even make it to state and national-level competitions. Best of luck for the rest of the year to our fellow GRB students!

On Valentine’s Day, students enjoyed a bit of fun sponsored by the German Club. Students could purchase notes for that special someone or friends and have them delivered to their guided study halls on Friday. The event created a nice atmosphere for the holiday even at the high school.

Students who have signed up for the GRB mentor program should report to their second session Feb. 25.

See you all back at school next week!

Zoo to You brings hands-on experiences to Lanigan Elementary

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Zoo to You visited Lanigan Elementary School in Fulton recently to present an educational program and deliver adoption certificates.

Each fourth-grade class adopted an animal from the Rosamond Gifford Zoo. The money was raised from a math-fact-a-thon held earlier in the year during which students studied multiplication facts and collected pledges.

The animals adopted by Lanigan students included a Red Panda, Reticulated Python, Bald Eagle and Snow Leopard.

There are two bald eagles and four snow leopards at the Syracuse zoo.

As a token of the zoos appreciation, each of the four classes received a gift bag filled with fact sheets, adoption certificates, colored photos and a stuffed animal.

Students will take turns bringing the plush animal home with them. Their adventures will be recorded in a traveling journal.

Zoo to You’s goal is to increase awareness of the animal kingdom and encourage students to be environmentally conscious. Each program includes live animals such as birds, reptiles and invertebrates.

Professional Zoo Educator Ashley brought along a Ball Python, Chilean rose hair tarantula and a screech owl.

Students were able to pet Namari the python, and feel how its skin is smooth, not slimy. Namari eats a meal of two dead mice once weekly. He smells with his forked tongue and swallows its prey by unhooking its jaw.

Gerty the tarantula was kept safe in a plastic enclosure. Her job is to eat bugs, and the zoo mimics the diet she would have in the wild.

The Eastern screech owl Pigwidgeon was born in Cato, and was tragically involved in a car accident. Pigwidgeon was blinded in one eye, and experienced some brain damage. For this reason, Pigwidgeon is kept safe behind the scenes at the zoo, and makes frequent classroom visits.

Students learned screech owls live in Central New York. They can be found wherever trees are, and camouflage themselves during the day. The bird of prey is nocturnal, and catches food with its feet.

The fourth-graders also were given a quick math lesson that just so happened to fit into their unit on fractions.

Pigwidegeon can turn his head 270 degrees, or three-fourths around. Humans can only rotate their heads 180 degrees.

 

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