The Sportsman’s World — The Crossbow War

By Leon Archer

In July, 1863, when the armed forces of the Confederacy lost Vicksburg, their last stronghold on the Mississippi, and suffered the punishing defeat of Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg, the South would have been wise to have sued for peace, but they soldiered on for nearly two more years before the civil war finally drew to a close.

The opponents in the Crossbow War could take a lesson from the misfortunes of Old Dixie.

Just as the Confederacy lost the war, imperceptibly at first, battlefield by battlefield, while the invading Yankees became stronger and more numerous, so the forces resisting the coming of the crossbow are facing defeat.

It may not be this year in New York state, but the results from battlefield to battlefield across this country leave little doubt who the winners will be in the end.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced his support for the legalization of the crossbow for hunting purposes in New York state during his State of the State message.

And just as importantly, he would give regulation authority for its use to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

I don’t agree with a lot of what our governor has said and done, but I’m with him 100 percent on this.

Of course, we will need both houses of our legislature to produce legislation which the majority will support and pass in order for the governor’s proposal to become reality.

That legislation should include the final battlefield, which is that the classification of the crossbow would be as a legal bow for use in any season and any area where archery is allowed, including archery only areas.

If that final victory doesn’t come this year, it will come soon. The hand writing is on the wall, and further resistance can only damage both sides, not change the final outcome.

Since the early 1970s, when only Arkansas and Ohio allowed hunting with a crossbow, the number of states accepting its use has grown steadily. Today, a total of 34 states have loosened or dropped their restrictions on crossbows since the year 2000.

At present, the battle is completely over in 24 states which now allow the crossbow to be used during any hunting season where archery is allowed, a movement that is gaining popularity in other open-minded states.

This is a civil war, sportsmen fighting sportsmen, both sides believing they are right, but only one side can win, and the empirical evidence is clear, crossbows are in our future.

The strongest resistance comes from a sportsman’s group, The New York Bow Hunters. They argue the crossbow is some sort of superior weapon, a silent super weapon that will allow poachers to decimate the deer herd.

While they claim the crossbow has an effective range of nearly seventy yards, at the same time they suggest more deer will be wounded and run off if crossbows are allowed, because they claim the crossbow is not as efficient as the bow they use.

They say the crossbow is so easy to use that a novice can be slaughtering deer on the same day they buy it. They say the crossbow does not require the same amount of dedication and commitment that is necessary to become a good archer.

A lot of other things they say about the crossbow were used by opponents of the compound bow and releases back in the 70s. Those arguments don’t hold any more water today when applied to the crossbow than they did back when they were applied to the compound bow.

I have to admit that I have never hunted with a crossbow, but I have shot them at targets quite a bit. I can tell you one thing from my own experience. The crossbow is very accurate at close range out to 30 yards or so, but at 70 yards it leaves a great deal to be desired. I would hardly call it effective at that range. At the longer ranges, the compound is much better, but even then, few archers will chance shooting at a deer 70 yards away.

As far as a tool for poaching, it is too cumbersome and why use it when a 22 caliber rifle would do the job far better.

I have never been a poacher, but I knew an old fellow years ago who lived up on the Tug Hill east of Sandy Creek, and my father told me that man fed his family on venison year round that he took with a single shot 22 rifle. It is quiet, doesn’t draw attention, and it is lethal well beyond the effective range of the crossbow or compound.

As far as wounding more deer, think about this. There is no reason why a bolt from a crossbow should cause the loss of any more deer than one might expect from an arrow from a compound bow.

They both work exactly the same way, causing reasonably quick death from massive bleeding due to the razor sharp blades. To put down the crossbow on this account is to damn the compound bow as well.

When I bought my first compound bow, I was able to hit the bullseye at 30 yards after just a couple of shots to adjust my aiming pin. After that I was pretty consistent.

Later that week, I was shooting from the roof on my shed, putting arrows through styrofoam cups on the ground. It didn’t require any great amount of dedication and commitment to use the compound bow well enough to hit any deer that wandered by my tree stand.

The dedication and commitment has little to do with the ease of use of either the crossbow or the modern compound bow. It is learning to hunt successfully and consistently that requires dedication and commitment, and that is true whether you hunt with a rifle, shotgun, crossbow, compound bow or black powder rifle.

I truly believe that bow hunters just don’t want to share their archery season with anyone carrying a crossbow. They deny that, but the denial has a false ring to it in my ears.

I believe it is time to end the war. It is time for bow hunters and crossbow hunters to learn to live together. I’m pretty sure, in a few years, everyone will be wondering what all the fuss was about.

That’s what has happened in the 24 states that have led the way.

States Allowing Crossbow Hunting

Arkansas 

Ohio

Michigan

Florida

Kansas

Delaware

Indiana

Alabama

Maryland

Texas

Pennsylvania

Nebraska

Mississippi

Rhode Island

North Dakota

Virginia

New Jersey

Georgia

Kentucky

South Carolina

North Carolina

Tennessee

Oklahoma

Wyoming

 

Fulton varsity hockey finishes season on a sour note

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton varsity hockey team went 1-4 during its last 5 games of the season.

The team finished the season with a 2-18-1 overall record.

On Jan. 26, Lake Placid rolled past Fulton, 6-2. The Red Raiders knocked off Ontario Bay, 6-4 on Jan. 29. On Jan. 30, Watertown-IHC held off Fulton, 4-3. Watertown-IHC also won the Feb. 3 rematch with the Red Raiders, 5-1.

Syracuse (a team consisting of several Syracuse-area players) cruised past Fulton, 5-1 on Feb. 4.

Lake Placid jumped out to an early 3-0 lead over Fulton in th first period and carried the 3-goal advantage into the half.

The Red Raiders were unable to get any closer during the game, as Lake Placid outscored Fulton by a goal during the third period en route to the 6-2 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Bryce Knight and Austin Vashaw with a goal each. Following Knight and Vashaw were Seth DeLisle and Stan Kubis with an assist each. Goalies Spencer Evans and Brandon Ladd combined to save 35 shots.

After a hard-fought first period in the Ontario Bay game, the teams were tied at 1-1.

Fulton stormed ahead during the second period, outscoring Ontario Bay by 2 goals to take a 4-2 lead. Both teams scored 2 goals during the third period as the Red Raiders came away with a 6-4 win.

Leading for Fulton was Bryce Knight with 4 goals and an assist. Trae Sheldon had a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle is credited with 3 assists and Ross Ryan tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 21 shots Ontario Bay sent his way.

Watertown-IHC escaped with a hard fought win over the Red Raiders. the game was tied at 1-1 following the first period and then Fulton built a lead in the second to take a 3-2 lead into intermission.

Watertown-IHC made the most of the third period, putting the puck in the net to tie the game at 3 and force overtime. Watertown-IHC then scored the game winning goal in overtime.

Fulton was led by Bryce Knight wiht a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle and Rocco Cannata had a goal each while Trae Sheldon is credited with 2 assists. Matt Billion also tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 41 shots.

In the rematch with Watertown-IHC, Watertown jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the first period. Both teams scored a goal in the second period and then Watertown-IHC scored again in the third period and held Fulton scoreless to win 5-1.

Leading the way for Fulton was Seth DeLisle with a goal assisted by Trae Sheldon. Goalie Brandon Ladd is credited with 31 saves.

In the Syracuse game, the Red Raiders trailed 1-0 after the first period. In the second, both teams scored one goal as Syracuse took a 2-1 lead into intermission.

Syracuse pulled away during the third period, outscoring Fulton by 3 goals to secure a 5-1 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Seth Cooney with one goal. Eric Forderkonz and Kris Grow had an assist each. Goalies Brandon Ladd and Landon VanAlstine combined to save 40 shots.

Victoria Litwak, longtime hairdresser

Victoria Litwak, 94, of Fulton, passed away Sunday Feb. 9 at her son’s home in Rochester.

Victoria was a life resident of the Fulton area and was a hairdresser for many years.

She was a communicant of St. Michael’s Church in Fulton and enjoyed traveling and gardening.

Victoria was predeceased by her husband, Louis in 1989 and son, Charles in 1981 and siblings, Charles and Ganina.

She is survived by her sons, Daniel (Linda) Litwak and Edwin (Donna) Litwak all of Rochester; two brothers, Ed and Al; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren.

Calling hours are 12 to 2 p.m. Saturday (today) with a funeral service to immediately follow.

Contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Service Foundation, 2180 Empire Blvd., Webster, 14580.

Joyce Louise Kenny, fan of Syracuse Chiefs and NY Mets

Joyce Louise Kenny, 72, of Granby, entered into eternal life on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 after a long illness.

She was born Aug. 4, 1941 in Fulton, a daughter to the late Samuel and Katherine Kenny and lived all her life in the Fulton area.

Joyce graduated from Hannibal High School and worked at the Sealright Company, which became Huhtamaki, and retired from there after 44 years of service.

She was a fan of the Syracuse Chiefs and New York Mets. Joyce was an avid bowler and won many trophies.

In addition to her parents, Joyce was predeceased by a brother, Samuel Clark Kenny, Jr.

She is survived by several cousins, close friends and by her beloved cat, Chloe, who shared her life and was greatly loved.

There are no calling hours. Graveside services will be in the spring at a date and time to be announced at Mount Adnah Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Ms. Kenny may be made to the Oswego County SPCA-OCAWL, P.O. Box 442, Fulton, NY 13069.

Foster Funeral Home, Fulton has care of arrangements.

Beatrice Lyons, enjoyed gardening

Beatrice J. Lyons, 95, of Scriba, passed away Monday Feb. 10 at Michaud Residential Health Services.

A native of Oswego, Bea had lived in the area for many years and enjoyed gardening.

She was predeceased by her husband, Milton “Mickey” Lyons, who passed away in 1983 and her infant son, Kenneth.

Bea will be greatly missed by her children, Ann Clark and Richard Lyons; sister, Hilda Case; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; one great-great-granddaughter; nieces and nephews.

Calling hours and service were Thursday Feb. 13 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton.

Contributions may be made to Michaud Residential Health Services, 453 Park St., Fulton, 13069.

Mary Ann Cavallaro, babysitter, baker

Mary Ann Cavallaro, 94, of Fulton, passed away peacefully Monday feb. 10 at her son’s home in Syracuse.

She was born in Fulton, NY June 7, 1919, the daughter of the late Salvatore and Santa Cutuli. She and her husband Morris were married Dec. 12, 1942 in Fulton, where they lived and raised their family.

Mary worked for a short time at the Fulton Woolen Mill and in New York City during World War II. As a homemaker, she babysat for the children of several families and sold homemade baked goods. She was a wonderful wife, mother and grandmother who loved being in the midst of her family.

Mary’s door was always open for company who would gather around the dining room table for delicious food, coffee and conversation.

She was a longtime member of Holy Family Church in Fulton.

Mary was predeceased by her husband of 43 years, Morris, in 1985, and by her sisters Ida Greco and Lucy Greco.

Mary is survived by her son, Maurice, of Syracuse; daughter, Linda (Gerald H) Brown of Oswego; grandsons Gregory and Christopher; sister Ann Louise of Syracuse; step granddaughters Bethany VanBuren, Renee Mulkerin, Cindy Lockler; seven step great grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be at 9:30 a.m. Saturday Feb. 15, 2014 in Holy Trinity Church, Fulton.

Calling hours will be 4 to 6 p.m. Friday Feb. 14 at the Sugar Funeral Home 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

Spring burial will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fulton.

Merton Spencer, retired from Palermo Highway Department

Merton R. Spencer, 85, of Palermo, passed away Monday, Feb. 10 at Pontiac Nursing Home in Oswego.

A native of Henderson, he had resided in the Palermo–Mexico area many years.

Mert retired from the Town of Palermo Highway Department after 24 years. He had previously worked at Nestle Co. in Fulton and on his parents’ dairy farm in North Mexico.

He was a former member of the Palermo Volunteer Fire Department.

Surviving are his wife of 60 years, Barbara Koliada Spencer of Palermo; eight children, Robert (Michelle) Spencer of Volney, Ronald Spencer of Palermo, Patricia (Joseph) Davis of Fulton, Randy (Kim) Spencer of Yarmouth, ME, Stephen (Karen) Spencer of Lakeland, FL, Pamela (Larry) Breckenridge of Lakeland, FL, Sheryl (Ken) Strait of Palermo and Susan (Ken) Beattie of Lakeland, FL; a brother, Frederick (Alice) Spencer of Central Square; a sister, Ruth (Bill) Barry of Sandy Creek; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Mert was predeceased by his parents, Jesse and Mildred Hill Spencer and a brother, John Spencer.

Calling hours are from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton with services immediately following.

A spring burial service will be held at Upson Corners Cemetery in Palermo.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Palermo Volunteer Fire Department.

Florence Rogers, worked at A.L. Lee Hospital

Florence L. Rogers, 86, of Fulton died Tuesday Feb. 11 at Pontiac Nursing Home, Oswego.

She was a born to the late Theron and Eva (Chapman) Clemons and she remained a life resident of Fulton.

Mrs. Rogers retired in 1993 from A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital after 20 years of service.

She is survived by her three daughters,  Margeurite (Larry Davis) Tetro of CA, Cheryl “Susie” (Mike) Snyder of Fulton, and Edith (Todd) Burdekin of Fulton; four grandchildren, Christine Tetro, Tina Donaldson, Mike Chrisman, Jamie Burdekin; six great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Friday at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., with Major James Purvis, from the Oswego County Salvation Army, presiding.

Burial will be held in the spring at Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton. Calling hours were Friday prior to the service.

Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, is in care of the arrangements.

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