Hannibal boys’ basketball ends season with 6-12 record

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal boys’ varsity basketball team went 2-2 in its last 4 games of the regular season and ended with a 6-12 record.

Hannibal fell to Jordan-Elbridge, 62-48, on Feb. 4. However, The Warriors cruised past county foe Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, 63-49, on Feb. 6.

On Feb. 8, Cazenovia beat Hannibal, 74-48. The Warriors knocked off Altmar-Parish-Williamstown again Feb. 11, 54-43.

J-E had a 3-point lead over Hannibal after the first quarter of their game, but the Warriors came back, outscoring J-E in the second quarter. Yet J-E still had a 2-point lead at the half.

Jordan-Elbridge added to its lead during the third quarter and then pulled away in the fourth quarter to seal the win.

Leading the way for the Warriors was Trevor Alton with 27 points, followed by Billy Skipper with 13 and Zane Pointon added 6.

Against A-P-W, the Warriors and Rebels were tied at 18 after the first quarter. Hannibal took over in the second, outscoring A-P-W by 20 points to take a 43-23 lead into the half.

The Warriors extended their lead during the third quarter, outscoring A-P-W by another 7 points. But the Rebels weren’t done and came back in the fourth quarter, outscoring Hannibal by 13 points. But it wasn’t enough to overtake Hannibal for the win.

Altmar-Parish-Williamstown was led by Tom Canfield with 14 points, followed by Masto Wada with 10, Sage Bartlett with 9, Baron Correll with 6 and Austin Lacelle and Jarid Paninski added 3 points each.

Leading the way for the Warriors was Trevor Alton with 22, followed by Sam McCraith with 16, Billy Skipper with 8 and Zane Pointon and Austin Mattison chipped in 6 points each.

In the Cazenovia game, the Lakers quickly built an early lead in the first quarter and built on it in the second to lead 30-23 at the half.

Caz expanded its lead during the third quarter, outscoring the Warriors by 7 points to extend its lead to 14 points. The Lakers put the game out of reach during the fourth quarter and won 74-48.

Hannibal was led by Trevor Alton with 19 points, followed by Sam McCraith and Billy Skipper with 9 points each. Austin Mattison added 6 points.

The Warriors and the Rebels went at it again Feb. 11, the second time they met in five days.

A-P-W jumped out to an 11-3 lead over the Warriors during the first quarter. But Hannibal got right back into it during the second quarter, outscoring the Rebels by 9 points to take a slim 1-point advantage into the half.

The Warriors built on their lead during the third quarter, outscoring A-P-W by 6 points and then didn’t let up in the fourth quarter to end with an 11-point win.

Leading the way for Altmar-Parish-Williamstown was Sage Bartlett with 20 points, followed by Masto Wada with 8, Baron Correll and Jarid Paninski scored 6 points each and Kenny Benedetto added 3 points.

Hannibal was led by Billy Skipper with 14 points, followed by Charlie McCraith and Trevor Alton with 12 points each, Zane Pointon with 8 and Sam McCraith and Austin Mattison combined to score 8 points for the Warriors.

Fulton girls’ hoops win first playoff game

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton girls’ varsity basketball team lost 3 out of its last 4 games to conclude the regular season with a 6-12 overall record.

The Lady Raiders qualified or the postseason and won its opening round of Section 3 playoffs by topping Homer Feb. 14 by a score of 37-33.

Fulton ended the season with losses to Skaneateles 47-34, Christian Brother academy 47-36 and East Syracuse Minoa 50-36. Fulton knocked off county foe Mexico 65-45 in one of its last games of the season.

In the Skaneateles game, Fulton had a 1-point lead in the first quarter, but the team was quickly overtaken by Skaneateles in the second. The Lakers had a 27-19 lead at the half.

Skaneateles added to its lead during the third quarter, outscoring Fulton by 5 points. And the Lady Raiders had no answers for the Lakers offense in the fourth quarter as Skaneateles came away with a 13-point win.

Leading the way for Fulton was Michaela Whiteman with 12 points, followed by Nicole Hansen with 8 and Courtney Parker and Kara Bricker with 4 points each.

After a competitive first quarter in the Mexico contest, the Tigers had a 4-point lead over Fulton. But the Lady Raiders quickly began to cut into the deficit and Mexico led at the half by only 1 point.

Fulton stormed ahead during the third quarter, outscoring Mexico by 9 points and then put the game out of reach in the fourth by outscoring Mexico by another 12 points.

Mexico was led by Kendra Harter with 14 points, followed by Sabrina Adams and Baily Wills with 8 points each, Amylyn Holland had 7 and Shelby Buffham and Emily Blunt combined to score 8 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Raiders was Nicole Hansen with 27 points and 15 rebounds. Following Hansen was Sydney Gilmore with 17 points, Michaela Whiteman with 12 and Mallory Clark added 5.

In a tight game with CBA, the Lady Raiders were trailing by 8 in the first quarter, but then stayed with CBA in the second, with both teams scoring 10 points.

CBA had a 28-20 halftime lead.

In the third quarter, both teams again scored 10 points as Christian Brothers Academy maintained its 8-point advantage. Christian Brothers Academy capped off a solid effort during the fourth quarter, outscoring Fulton by 3 points to come away with a 47-36 win.

The Lady Raiders were led by Nicole Hansen with 10 points, followed by Sydney Gilmore with 9 and Mallory Clark scored 7.

In the regular season finale, ESM jumped out to a 9-point lead over Fulton in the first quarter and then poured on 12 more points to have a 28-7 halftime lead.

Fulton proved to be more competitive during the second half, outscoring ESM in the third to cut into the Spartans lead. They outscored East Syracuse-Minoa during the third and fourth quarters to cut into its lead, but the Lady Raiders could not erase the entire lead as ESM won by 14 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Raiders was Nicole Hansen with 18 points, followed by Mallory Clark with 8, Michaela Whiteman with 7 and Sydney Gilmore added 3 points.

In the playoff game against Homer, Fulton built an early lead of 5 point in the first quarter.

But Homer wasted little time battling back. They outscored the Lady Raiders by 4 points but still trailed at halftime, 18-17.

Fulton added to its lead following a competitive third quarter, outscoring Homer to push its lead to 2 points.

The Lady Raiders made the plays they needed down the stretch to secure the win. Fulton outscored Homer by 2 points during the fourth quarter to come away with a 37-33 win.

The Lady Raiders were led by Sydney Gilmore and Michaela Whiteman with 8 points each. Following Gilmore and Whiteman were Mallory Clark and Courtney Parker with 6 points each. Nicole Hansen added 5 points and Hunter Hartranft chipped in 4 points.

Algidio “Archie” Fiorini, former member of Fulton Planning Commission

Algidio “Archie” Fiorini, 79, of Fulton, died Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014, in the Oswego Hospital after a short illness.

Mr. Fiorini was born in Fulton, the son of the late Angelo and Elena (Boccitto) Fiorini. He was sales director for Archway Cookie for many years until his retirement in 1997.

Mr. Fiorini served in the United States Navy from 1952 until 1955. He was board member for the Oswego County Catholic Charities, a member of the City of Fulton Planning Commission, and he was trustee for Holy Family Church, Fulton.

Mr. Fiorini was predeceased by his daughter, Elena Taggart in 2009, and his brother Peter Fiorini.

Mr. Fiorini is survived by his wife of 58 years Bianca Fiorini of Fulton; their children Silvia (Robert) Langdon of Fulton, Daniel (Peggy) Fiorini of Baldwinsville, Steven Fiorini of Fulton, Mark Fiorini of Baldwinsville; son-in-law Peter Taggart of Bainbridge; two brothers Albert (Diane) Fiorini of GA, Anthony (Jill) Fiorini of CA; 10 grandchildren Rachel, Jessica, Erica, Sarah, Nicholas, Dan, Gina, Vanessa, Hannah, Jeremy; and four great grandchildren Leah, Mason, Elaina, and Wynter.

Funeral services were Friday in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, Minetto. Burial will be private. There will be no calling hours.

The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar Funeral Home Inc., 224 W. Second St., Fulton.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Mr. Fiorini’s name to the John Foster Burden Fund, St. Luke Health Services, 299 E. River Road, Oswego.

2 Fulton wrestlers, 4 Mexico wrestlers win Section 3 titles

By Dan Farfaglia

Fulton wrestlers Mitch Woodworth (120 pounds) and Travis Race (160 pounds) earned the right to represent Section 3 at the Division One New York State Public High School Tournament being held at the Times Union Center in Albany this year. 

They are other wrestlers from throughout the area competed Feb. 15 at the Section 3 Division I and II Championships at the SRC Arena at Onondaga Community College.

In his championship match, Woodworth won by a score of 12-2 over previously undefeated Dandre Norman of Rome Free Academy. On his way to the finals, he won by a 10-2 decision over Peter Nash of Liverpool and pinned Dylan Wallace from Central Square.

This is the second sectional title for Woodworth, who has more than 100 wins in his career. He is only a junior and therefore may break some school records by the time he finishes his senior season next year.

In addition to finishing the tournament in first place, Woodworth also received the Division One Tournament`s Most Outstanding Wrestler Award.

Race has been an upper weight varsity standout for two seasons, and he’s only a freshman.

In the finals, he defeated Jerrett Norton of Cicero-North Syracuse 12-8. Earlier in the day he pinned New Hartford`s Tom Zegarelli and defeated Tom Peterson, also of C-NS, 4-3.

Other wrestlers for Fulton who place in the tournament were Joe Abelgore (106 pounds), fourth place, and Collin Flynn (145 pounds), fourth place.

Coming in fifth were Kevin Tucker (113 pounds), Tim Holden (138 pounds), James Bailey (170 pounds), Matt Marshall (220 pounds) and Malachi Manford (285 pounds). Kyle Ware (145 pounds) finished the season in sixth.

Baldwinsville won the Division One Tournament for the second year in a row with 155 points. Liverpool, coached by former Fulton wrestler David Wise, earned second place with 137 points. Fulton came in third with an overall score of 134 points.

In other Division One news, Oswego`s Eric Doviak (285 pounds) and Central Square`s Blake Engebretsen (145 pounds) came in second place at the tournament. Elijah Sampo (220 pounds), also from Central Square, earned third-place honors and his teammates Max Emond (152 pounds) and Phoenix Webb (160 pounds) came in fourth.

Austin Coleman (132 pounds) from Oswego also finished fourth. Ending their seasons in fifth were Jacob Garrow (106 pounds) from Central Square, along with Jordan Attwood (152 pounds) and Austin Piazza (195 pounds) from Oswego.

In Division Two, South Jefferson came in first with 132.5 points and Mexico came in second with 123.5 points. Phoenix finished in sixth with 74 points.

Mexico is sending four wrestlers to the State Tournament in Albany. Winning championship titles were Theo Powers (106 pounds), Austin Whitney (132 pounds), Trevor Allard (160 pounds), and Jacob Woolson (170 pounds). William Hilliard (182 pounds) of Phoenix ended the day in second place.

The New York State Wrestling Tournament will be Feb. 28 and March 1.

Sandra L. House, Salvation Army volunteer

Sandra L. House, 55, of Fulton, died Tuesday evening Feb. 18 at her home after short illness.

She was born in Fulton, the daughter of the late Wesley and Betty (Carr) Thrasher.

Mrs. House was a volunteer at the Salvation Army food pantry. She was a member of the Oswego County Association for the Deaf.

Mrs. House is survived by her husband of 24 years, Leon House of Fulton; son Leon House Jr., of Fulton; five grandchildren; her sister Lori; and brother Wesley.

Calling hours will be Monday Feb. 24 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Sugar Funeral Home, 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, NY.

The Sportsman’s World

By Leon Archer

It might surprise some, but as a writer, I read a huge amount more than I write, and recently while sharing nanny duties with Sweet Thing in Sammamish, Wash., I’ve had the opportunity to do plenty of reading.

When it comes to reading, one of my passions is history, especially North American history. In the last three weeks I have read seven books on the topic.

I am sure some readers will wonder what in the world this has to do with the outdoors, but hang with me for a bit.

I read the following books: “The Frontiersman,” by Allan Eckert (600-plus pages); “Forgotten Allies,” by Joseph Glattharr and James Martin (400-plus pages); “Fusiliers,” by Mark Urban (380 pages); “Betrayals,” by Ian K. Steele (250 pages); “Rebellion in the Mohawk Valley,” by Gavin Watt (432 pages); “A Dirty Trifling Piece Of Business,” by Gavin Watt (500+ pages); and “I Am Heartily Ashamed,” by Gavin Watt (463 pages).

Altogether, I read better than 3,000 pages. It was an adventure for me.

If you got beyond the sixth grade, at some point you should have learned that Europeans came to the new world primarily for three reasons: religious freedom, free land and wealth.

The Spanish were the first to come in any numbers, and their interests carried them across the South to the Southwest, and West of what is now the United States.

However, their real impact was on Mexico, Central America and South America, where they found large quantities of gold and silver in the kingdoms of the Aztecs, Incas and Mayans, whom they immediately set about decimating while relieving them of the precious metals.

I confined my reading to colonial North America where settlers arrived primarily from the Netherlands, England and France. I know that ignores the sizeable numbers of Scots and Germans (Palatines) who also came to the new world, but they represented peoples, not nations.

The French claimed Canada, a strip of land on the southern shore of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, as well as the Ohio Valley and vast areas of land surrounding the upper Great Lakes.

The Dutch were modestly situated primarily in our New York state along the Hudson River, and traded for furs with the Iroquois Indians between 1610 and 1664. This brought them into a direct competition with the French and their Indian allies.

The Dutch encouraged the Mohawks to expand their fur gathering into areas that were under the control of the French and the numerous Indian tribes who provided the furs to them.

That brought about the “Beaver Wars,” also called the French and Iroquois wars, as the Iroquois sought to extend their power and the French endeavored to stop them.

The English were not unaware of the Dutch fur monopoly that was developing in New Netherlands. England’s power was growing both north and south of the Dutch colony, and between 1664 and 1674 the two countries fought the three Dutch-Anglo Wars.

As a result of the wars, England relieved the Netherlands of her North American Colonies, leaving only France and England vying for the prize. It mattered little to them that the land was already occupied by various and sundry Indian tribes.

The fly in the ointment was the two European powers now standing astride this vast land were mortal enemies. Hundreds of years of intermittent warfare would now spread to North America.

The migrants who came from England came to settle the land. The Dutch before them had come for the same reason, but not with the ferocity and persistence, and numbers of the English.

The French came for the lucrative fur trade, and their settlements were established primarily to facilitate and protect that trade, not to really colonize and settle.

After digesting New Amsterdam, the English set about taking over its fur trade, but they also encouraged settlers to move north towards Lake Champlain and the Mohawk Valley. Over the next 80 years, several wars were fought between the French and English across the vast wilderness they both coveted.

At first the French were victorious, but year after year England’s strength in the new world grew while the French languished.

By 1763, the English had conquered the French and sent them packing but their victory would be short lived south of the Great Lakes, as a great new nation was in the throes of birth.

We are here and English speaking in a significant part, because of fur. That’s where it all began. Fur, mostly beaver, was a vital interest and desirable commodity in the New World, but by 1783, when peace was signed between the new United States of America and England, the beaver had nearly vanished from New York State, and at one point was down to a single small colony.

It may be hard to believe when we have so many beaver today, but 75 years ago, it was illegal to trap the beaver that had just begun to recolonize our state.

Next week, I’m going to be writing about the fur trade today. I would enjoy hearing from trappers, how they have been doing and the recent prices they have been getting for their pelts.

Drop me an email at lfarcher@yahoo.com — I’d love to hear from you.

What does Cuomo’s tax rebate plan really mean?

By Debra J. Groom

In his 2014-15 state budget presentation, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he will provide $1 billion for property tax relief.

At a recent Oswego County Legislature meeting, Oswego County Administrator Philip Church broke down the proposal on what it would mean for Oswego County residents.

In a 13-page analysis, Church said there are many unanswered questions as to how this tax relief will work and how it will be funded.

He said using the county’s tax levies (the amount raised by taxes) for operations, community college and workers compensation, residents with an average Oswego County home valued at $94,500 would receive a rebate of about $16.

And because the tax relief would affect all taxing jurisdictions (county, town, city, village, school districts), the full rebate would be less than $74.

This would be a two-year rebate, Church said.

He believes the state should take the money Cuomo wants for tax relief and instead of one-time rebates, put it toward permanent mandate relief.

This mandate relief would be reducing the cost of programs the state makes the county pay each year. Church said this would help taxpayers by reducing their property tax burden permanently.

“Many counties and the New York State Association of Counties are proposing this alternative method to provide property tax reductions to New Yorkers,” Church wrote in his analysis.

“The alternative consists of the state taking over the costs of four of its own programs: Medicaid, indigent defense, preschool special education and Safety Net,” he said.

Church said if the state paid for these programs, the reductions to the average Oswego County taxpayer’s bill would be about $514.

He also believes if the state pays for the programs itself, it would be forced to reform services.

Other problems with Cuomo’s tax rebate plan, according to Church:

** It is only temporary

** Rebates are reportable as income on federal income tax returns, “diminishing the overall financial benefit,” he writes.

** The cost of implementing the rebate program isn’t known. Church said the state will use tax levy data to compute the rebates and “the bureaucracy needed to collect, record and organize all tax levy date in the state” and then determine each homeowner’s eligibility and tax rebate will be large and a large cost to taxpayers.

** The state is operating now on tax levy data from 2012, stating this is the most recent data the state has. “How will the state be able to calculate rebates on a current year tax levy with any reasonable assurance to taxpayers that is was done accurately and fairly?” he writes.

** For homeowners to receive a rebate in the second year, the county must develop and submit plans to the state by June 2015 concerning consolidation and shared services. The county cannot use in its plan any consolidations or shared services it has already completed. He estimates Oswego County would have to come up with about $7.2 million in savings through its consolidation/shared services plan if all tax jurisdictions in the county participated.

** In order for a municipality to participate in the tax freeze rebate program, it cannot adopt a precautionary waiver of the state’s 2 percent tax cap. Oswego County adopts the waiver each year due to the ongoing tax status negotiations with Entergy for the FitzPatrick nuclear plant in Scriba.

Without the waiver, taxpayers could be left having to come up with millions of dollars in penalties if a tax settlement for Entergy greatly changed previous years county tax levies.

So participating in the tax rebate program would pose a large risk for Oswego County, Church said.

Legislature Minority Leader Michael Kunzwiler, D-Oswego, said he believes  Cuomo’s idea to push for more shared services and consolidation is good, especially as it get more people talking about the issue.

“If this stirs things up, that’s good,” he said.

He disagreed with Church’s emphasis on state mandate relief, stating Church for too long has been singing this same song.

“Phil has to stop pointing the finger and srart looking in the mirror,” Kunzwiler said. “Phil’s top worry is about what the state is doing — instead we should start cleaning up our own house.”

Calvin C. Hall, owned Hall Electric and Motor

Calvin C. Hall, 87, of Fulton, died Monday Feb. 17 at Michaud Residential Health Services.

He was born in Volney, the son of the late Clinton and Ella (Allen) Hall.

He was the owner of Hall’s Electric and Motor of Fulton until his retirement.

Mr. Hall was a life member of the Lions Club of Fulton. He served in the United States Navy during World War II.

He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Josephine Hall of Fulton; his sons Gary (Beth) Hall of Fulton, Calvin A. Hall of Oswego; brother Cedric Hall of Fulton; sister Carrie Palmer of Fulton; four grandchildren; and one great grandchild.

Spring burial will be in Fairdale Cemetery.

The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar Funeral Home 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

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