Free cancer screening health fair March 11 in Central Square

A free cancer screening health fair will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 11 at Oswego Health’s Central Square Medical Center.

Oswego Health and Oswego County Opportunities Cancer Services Program have teamed up to offer this event that is open to the public.

The event is being held as part of the two health partners activities in March, which is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

At the health fair, free take-home FIT tests, which screen for colon cancer will be available to those age 50 to 64.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths. It is recommended that all men and women, age 50 or older be screened for colorectal cancer.

Other screenings at the health fair will include free mammograms for those who are uninsured or who meet certain income criteria.

To learn more about eligibility or to make a mammogram appointment, call 592-0830. Free clinical breast exams will also be offered at the health fair.

In addition, health fair participants can take advantage of free bone density screenings, as well as learn more about the health plans available through the New York State Marketplace and about the Healthy Cooking Connections Program, which is open to those with a chronic disease and provides free weekly food boxes to those who take part in nutrition classes.

Healthy free refreshments will also be offered to those who attend the cancer screening health fair.

The Central Square Medical Center is located at 3045 East Avenue (Route 49) in the village of Central Square.

For more information, call Carolyn Handville at Oswego County Opportunities at 592-0830.

THE SPORTSMAN’S WORLD: Will March go out like a lamb?

By Leon Archer

The old saying is, if March comes in like a Lion, it will go out like a lamb, and conversely, if March comes in like a lamb, it will go out like a lion.

If there is any truth to that, the end of the month should be pretty darned good.

In the meantime, there is plenty of ice for the ice fishermen and probably way too much snow and ice for the steelhead fishermen. Both the ice fisherman and the steelheader are a hardy breed.

The conditions on the streams and rivers should be much more conducive for catching those big trout as March slowly starts to mellow. I never fished for them much until April arrived, but once the weather started to get warm enough to tempt me to wet a line, I caught some nice ones.

Fact is, the really good steelhead fishing started on the Salmon River and other area streams after I had nearly given up fishing in the coldest months. I guess I had become a wimp.

I was trying to remember years when March was a docile as a summer night. I don’t have any dates in my head, but sweet thing’s birthday comes on March 27, and I remember us having a picnic on her birthday one year when the temperature was 75 degrees and the daffodils had been in blossom for at least a week and a half before.

I also collected sap a number of years with my father-in-law, Harvey Yerdon, when the ground was getting mostly bare before the end of March, and the maple season was nearly over.

With temperatures finally giving us a little break, it looks like the maple syrup season should be up and running.

Harvey always said there were a few things you needed for a good syrup season. They were: thawing days and freezing nights, snow on the ground – preferably with several crusts – rain, and reasonably calm days.

The season lasted longer if the weather didn’t warm up too much, too quickly. I think the conditions are pretty good this year for a better than average syrup season, but I’m really not much better at predicting the weather than Punxsutawney Phil, so who knows?

One thing is certain, spring always comes. I am a great fan of spring. I like fishing the streams before the rocks have become too slippery for an old guy like me.

I live for the tug of a bullhead at the end of my line on a warm night on Sandy Pond. I take great pleasure in picking up a couple hundred night crawlers on a damp evening. I even enjoy just sitting outside and listening to the spring peepers.

And I love the smell of spring, the odor of promise of great days to come.

After this winter, just about anything March has to offer is going to look good.

I’m hoping for a good bullhead season. My favorite fish is likely still snoring away safely tucked into a soft bottom underneath the ice, but as soon as the sun gets higher, the water starts to warm and the ice gets rotten, his alarm clock will go off. I’ll be waiting for Mr. Whiskers.

Nothing brings back memories any stronger than sitting beside a gas lantern, listening to the frogs and peepers, hoping to see my rod tip jump as a bullhead takes the bait. My father and I passed many pleasant night hours together in friendly competition at the expense of Mr. Whiskers.

It doesn’t get much better than that. It gets my heart pumping just thinking about it.

Yep, I love the spring.

Fulton Squirts team wins JAM tourney

The Fulton Squirt Hockey team sponsored by Chris Nelson Insurance, Fulton Lions Club and Fulton Medical Center took first place in their end of the season league championship JAM tournament. Fulton beat Onondaga in the championship game 3-1 to take the title. Trey White was stellar between the pipes and had many saves. Fulton’s offense kept pressure on Onondaga’s defense for three periods. The forwards were led by Jon Dingman, Brady Zych, Tanner Tetro, Fred White, Caden Waldau, Lucas Nelson, Josh Cook and Nicolas Schremp.  Defensively the team played its best game of the tournament and were led by Logan McDougall, Adam Cooney, Courtney Bednarz, Gino Noel and Andrew Coleman. In the photo are: front Caden Waldau and Trey White, second row Courtney Bednarz, Fred White, Jon Dingman, Brady Zych and Tanner Tetro, third row Andrew Coleman, Gino Noel, Logan McDougall, Lucas Nelson, Adam Cooney, Nicolas Schremp and Josh Cook. Coaches left to right Jamie Tetro, Jeff Schremp and Joe White

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Bowling scores

Monday Night Women’s Michelob/ Shuba 2 Construction League

Bowled at The Recreation Club

Monday March 3, 2014

  • Kathy Fitzpatrick  588- 221, 193, 174
  • Paula Distin          514- 177, 154, 183
  • Della Daniels        514-  182,182, 150
  • Annette Cotton     511- 167, 170, 174
  • Michelle Simpson  506- 159, 170, 177
  • Patty Davis           483- 136, 156, 191
  • Gina Coomey       469- 162, 133, 174
  • Ann Kastler          460- 136, 147, 177
  • Sharon Allen        450- 159, 133, 158

Winning Edge Women’s League

Bowled at Lakeview Lanes

Wednesday March 5, 2014

  • Jackie Coon              594- 183, 206, 205
  • Kathy Pipher             575- 182, 170, 223
  • Theresa Grinnell       546- 174, 194, 178
  • MaryAnn McGregor  518- 175, 170, 173 
  • Dawne Hartranft        514- 143, 198, 173
  • Toni Nelepovitz         504- 177, 147, 180
  • Katie Jodway            492- 140, 188, 164
  • Michelle Terpening   486- 157, 139, 190
  • Ginny Ostness          483- 154, 155, 174
  • Della Daniels            482- 150, 156, 176
  • Tricia Hines              474- 136, 166, 172
  • Linda Yager              472- 133, 193, 146
  • MaryAnn Schreck     471- 128, 150, 193
  • Paula Distin              458- 122, 146, 190

Fulton girls’ basketball looks toward the future

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton girls’ varsity basketball team took the court this season as a team that lacked experience at the varsity level.

However, Fulton went on to finish the 2013-14 season with an overall record of 7-13 en route to a Sectional Playoff appearance.

The Lady Raiders fell to Jamesville-DeWitt in the quarterfinals of The Class A, Section 3 Playoffs.

This season, Fulton played a very tough schedule, but often answered the challenge.

Fulton Coach Derek Lyons said the experiences his team had this season should help them realize they can play with anyone if they are able to play together.

Looking ahead, Lyons is optimistic about the future of Fulton girls’ basketball.

He feels the promise his young team showed this season could pay off for them in a couple of years. Lyons points out the key to his teams’ success in the future will be its work ethic.

“These kids are hard workers and have the capability to be really good,” he said.

Business owner earns county honor

Recognizing Oswego County has selected Thomas Abbott, owner of Abbott’s Tae Kwon Do in Mexico, as the Community Champion for February.

This month’s theme was indoor recreation/physical activity and the group received a rich slate of nominations that also included Burger’s Karate, the Oswego Boxing Club and the USS Truxton Sea Cadets.

ROC Co-Chair Brandon Morey commented that having four deserving candidates demonstrates the breadth of physical activity programming that is happening in Oswego County.

“Having great nominations makes it difficult to select a champion, but is great in terms of having options in the community for staying active, even in these long, cold winter months,” Morey said.

Recognizing Oswego County focuses on the positive efforts being made in the community. Each month, ROC uses this recognition effort as a platform for emphasizing the wonderful work that is happening in Oswego County to promote the health and wellness of children, families and adults.

Abbott opened his Tae Kwon Do school in February 2007 after being a student of the sport for many years. He recalled his first class as a student more than 20 years ago and how Tae Kwon Do has helped him become more self-confident and self-assured.  His goal in starting a studio was passing that on to his students.

“I see my students gain confidence, stand taller, speak up and say ‘yes sir’ and ‘yes ma’am’” Abbott said. He once had a teacher of one of his students tell him that she had noticed a change in the students’ behavior and focus in school. The teacher attributed these improvements in behavior to the Tae Kwon Do classes the student had recently started.

In nominating Abbott, Tammy Elowsky highlighted Abbott’s approach to teaching students through promotion of both physical and mental well-being. Elowsky also described Abbott’s activities that go above and beyond the day-to-day operation of a Tae Kwon Do school.

“He volunteers his time judging tournaments, helping other instructors perfect their skills in sister schools, pushing free instruction into the after school programs from time to time, and organizing fundraising activities for various causes,” Elowsky said.

Abbott said he also encourages his students to give back to their parents, peers, schools and communities by showing respect and through positive behaviors.

Students less than age 13 earn character stripes for showing initiative in helping others, logging extra reading outside of school, good character development home report card assessments from their parents, and exceptional grades at school.

Each month, ROC selects a theme and guest speakers are invited to share the good work they are doing. Nominations are also solicited from the community at large for Community Champions.

For March, ROC is seeking nominations for Community Champion for literacy awareness. Nominations are due by March 12 and can be submitted online through Recognizing Oswego County’s Facebook page or by email to bmorey@oswegocounty.com.

ROC members meet monthly from 8 to 9:15 a.m. on the second Thursday of the month at the Oswego County Federal Credit Union at 90 E. Bridge St., Oswego.

Hunter Chase McIntyre joins sister Kayden

Kayden McIntyre announces the birth of her brother Hunter Chase McIntyre on January 16. He weighed 7 pounds 11 ounces and was 19 inches long. Proud parents are Tom and Dana McIntyre of Fulton. Grandparents are Stan and Terry Lyttle of Hannibal and Tom and Donna McIntyre of Sterling. Great grandparents are Paul and Jeanette McIntyre of Sterling, Jane Spicer of Hannibal, and Stan Lyttle of Rochester.

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Oswego High grad finishes Navy training

Navy Seaman Apprentice David E. Johnson, son of David E. and Rebecca L. Johnson of Oswego, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill.

During the eight-week program, Johnson completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety.

An emphasis also was placed on physical fitness.

The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations.” This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet.

“Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment.

Its distinctly ‘’Navy’’ flavor was designed to take into account what it means to be a sailor.

Johnson is a 2012 graduate of Oswego High School.

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