Dillon Middle presents citizenship awards

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Forty-seven students at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School in the Phoenix Central School District were honored recently for being exemplary citizens.

Citizenship Awards recognize role model students who are dependable, responsible, courteous, thoughtful of both peers and adults, congenial, friendly, and who show school spirit and pride and respect for others and their belongings.

Students earning the distinction are nominated for the honor by Dillon Middle School faculty members and receive a certificate of distinction as well as a copy of the nomination letter.

Fifth-graders receiving Citizenship Awards are: Natalie Brown, Chloe Calkins, Tabitha Clark, Ethan Fox, Noah Gordon, Mattison Hess, Miranda LaRobardiere, Lily Roberts, and Thomas Uhl.

Sixth-grade Citizenship Award honorees are: Cade Bacon, Matthew Doane, Darren Fischel, Hailey Goudy, Cassadee Handville, Trish Harris, Madison Kalt, Alexandria Mills, Savanah Neupert, Jillian Ricard, Leah Schlachter, McKenna Squier, Sarah Thorn, and Teresa Uhl.

Seventh-grade Citizenship Award honorees are: Gabriella Allen, Ashley Carbonaro, Trevor Halstead, Megan Hess, Emilie Hilliard, Lawrence Karl, Raina Knapp, Cole LaPine, Wendy Li, Ashley Margrey, Ross McFarland, Alayna Merrill, and Joshua VanGorder.

Eighth-grade Citizenship Award honorees are: Samantha Doupe, Veronica Gates, Morgan Gravlin, Natalie Hart, Alexandra Hoag, Joe Lacey, Breanna Mitchell, Alex Sisera, Jerrett Williams, Jordan Williams, and Julianne Yates.

Jerry’s Journal, March 8

If you read my last journal you know that Peter Palmer was born with one arm, has a driver’s license but loves to walk (especially across the Lower Bridge on his way downtown), is a devout Catholic and once entered a monastery, is retired from the Oswego County Social Service Department after 32 years, is Fulton’s historian — can reel off facts about our hometown in the blink of an eye — and has lived in the same house on Worth Street his entire life.

“Did you know that Worth Street was the first street in Fulton to be paved?” Peter inquired of me during our interview.

It was because Mayor Foster lived on Worth Street.

“What was Mayor Foster’s first name?” I asked.

So, Peter looked it up and to our surprise, we discovered there were in fact two mayors with the last name of Foster. (I do not know if they were brothers; it’s something to further investigate.)

James Foster lived at 94 Worth St. and was mayor from 1902-04; while John M. Foster at 88 Worth St. was mayor 1906-08. That’s where Foster Park got its name.

“It once was an Indian burial ground,” Peter said. “You can still see a couple of the mounds.”

Oh, yes, Foster Park. …. I reminisced a bit and told Peter that my Dad had worked for the Best Ice Cream Co. on West First Street when I was a small child. … My Mom used to walk me down the steep stairs that went straight down into the park. … . I wonder if they’re still there?

Peter said John Foster had a daughter named Geraldine (that’s my proper name, too, a beautiful name if there ever was one, so my mother thought), and according to a 1948 city directory, Ms. Foster worked in our city library, in the children’s section.

She eventually sold their home on Worth Street and bought a house at 218 S. Fourth St. where she once entertained Eleanor Roosevelt at a tea.

Folk art painter Norman Rockwell also is said to have visited Geraldine Foster and stayed at her family’s camp on the river just north of the city. While in our area, Rockwell painted a picture of four boys on a toboggan.

One of those boys was Joe Crahan, who became a well known policeman around town.

Peter’s grandfather, Seymour Palmer, purchased the house on Worth Street a hundred years ago for his wife, Blanche, who did not like living in the country.

The house already had electricity, and his grandfather installed bathroom plumbing, but really didn’t like using it. He preferred the outhouse, Peter said. (He didn’t want bad smells in their home!)

The outhouse is gone now, as is the barn out back, Peter said. Their then next door neighbor, Coach Willard “Andy” Anderson, helped take them down and helped build the “new” garage that replaced them.

The Palmer home hasn’t changed too much over the years, Peter chuckled. He said he even has his grandmother’s “stuffed” canary.

And there are ghosts…you can hear their footsteps… and a neighbor thought she saw Peter’s dad sitting in the dinning room, while someone else thought they saw his grandfather sitting in his chair.

Both men had died in the house, but not at the same time, and both went peacefully.

I thank Peter for his time and stories and I guarantee they’ll be more from and about him in future columns.

Well, dear Readers, it’s been a long, hard winter and though I could have and should have done a lot more than looking out the window and longing for warm weather, it hasn’t been a total waste of time, (where does the time go? It’s March already!)

I’ve finally gotten all seven years of Jerry’s Journals — clippings from the Fulton Patriot and the Valley News — into two crammed notebooks, have completed a photo album from Ed’s 80th birthday last summer, and have organized into a less chaotic mess all the memorabilia my faithful readers and contributors have given me to use in my columns.

Now I can more easily find what I need when I need it!

Getting to the pile of stuff on my desk, however, I was horrified and embarrassed to find a long-forgotten letter from former Fultonian Walt Carrington who wrote two pages of “gist for Jerry’s Journal.”

His subject matter was “Transportation,” which I found most interesting and will share with you next time. Until then, I sincerely hope Walt will forgive me for the oversight.

Meanwhile, ponder this: Longing for the” Good Old Days” isn’t something new. The following excerpts are from a booklet of poems, “As I Remember,” written by Fred Kenyon Jones of Fulton, and dated 1934.

“They made twin beds in case he snores; They made machines to do the chores; They moved the pulley works out of town; They finally burned the round house down.

“They took the eel-pot out of the river; They charge you 50 cents for liver; They slowed up serge and started silk; They even stopped making Nestlé’s milk.”

“T’was fun to walk three miles to school; And help hitch-up old Jennie mule; ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ was a glorious treat; Or putting a tack on a teacher’s seat.

“Remember the days of the huskin’ bee? Yokes of oxen you no more see; But, there’s one thing you moss-back know; We had fun — 30 years ago!”

I thank Tom Trepasso for loaning me the booklet from which I took the passages. It was written the year I was born. It’s hard to recall or even imagine all the things that have changed since then, and it makes a person wonder what the next 80 years will bring!.

Now here’s my caveat: Readers beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share.

Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up. I hope you have fun reading my stuff. Your comments, additions and corrections are always welcome.

You may contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan808@aol.com. Please put Jerry’s Journal in the subject line. Thanks!

Hodgepodge, March 8

Tales of winters past

The older generations have always told stories of winters of their younger days to their children and grandchildren.

You know — the ones that start out, “Back when I was a kid in the winter time …”

It was likely that I had heard tales about my grandparents coping with big storms, about their trips through the deep snow to the hen house to gather eggs, and the sleigh rides of their younger days.

I do know that my grandparents both grew up on farms in the days when horses and one’s legs were the main sources of transportation.

I grew up in Syracuse and I had no difficulty thinking about the snowy winters of my youth. Winters when the snow was often up too high to get the back door open; many winters when the usually wide street in front of our house was narrowed down to a path that the cars with their tire chains didn’t dare to travel on.

It seems there was no shortage of snowy excitement from my younger days — adventures which should have kept my own children amazed by the stories of their father’s winter time activities.

Oh, my generation and I — we had our moments, OK? — but there was one problem when it came to bragging to my children about the winter time adventures of my youth.

Only one BIG problem — my kids were growing up in Fulton’s winter weather and nothing I could say about growing up in Syracuse would impress them. I’m afraid that they would have been bored from the beginning.

In Fulton the snow- banks were higher, and the houses were literally buried in snow from October to April; sometimes traces still lingered in May. It took a lot to impress them when snow stories were being told.

 

Dad’s snow tunnel

Wait a minute – I had it. When asked about my own adventures in the snow, I would cleverly switch the scene back a few years.

“Did I ever tell you about the time Grandpa (my father) was a kid?  Well, this one day there was so much snow between his house and his friend’s house across the street that they had to dig a tunnel from one to the other – and I got some pictures somewhere to prove it.”  Wow!

Well, that seemed to do it. They were impressed, and I am still searching for that picture.

 

Take a walk

I have always tried to do some walking as often as I could, just for the sake of walking and some exercise.

For years, my wife and I enjoyed frequent neighborhood walks in decent weather. Now that I am home more during the day, I try to take regular neighborhood jaunts. I find that my walks are half as long and twice as tiring these days.

When I lived in Fulton, walking was a daily ritual. We had a couple of set patterns for our walks.

As it is a common routine in Fulton to “walk the bridges,” we did that at least half of the time.

On other occasions, since we lived on the east side, we would take the “east side trek” from our house near East Side Park, up to Nestles, and then follow a rectangular course until we were close to where we started, and return home.

(I don’t live in Fulton now, but if I did I wonder how I could manage to shorten the distance between those bridges.)

If you are a walker and follow the same route every day at approximately the same time, walking can become a social event as you will meet up with at least some of the same people every day.

If you have walked for recreation for several years you will discover that you have participated in a variety of styles — moving along briskly; slowing down so your walking partner could keep up; moving slow enough to enjoy the passing scenery, and finally, “plodding along” (and slowing your walking partner down).

In your early walking days, the toot of a horn from a passing vehicle probably was a greeting from an acquaintance; now, the same thing could be considered more of a “get-out-of-the-way” blast.

And finally, a bit of wisdom from an unknown source: “Walking is a wonderful exercise that is sure to prolong your life, unless you try to cross the street.”

A question left over from last month:

Why is February the shortest month?

Well, here’s an explanation.  Back in Julius Caesar’s days, the months alternated: 31 days, 30 days, 31 days, etc., for a total of 366 days.

Julius decided he wanted a month named after him. He took the seventh month, named it July, shoved the other months down a notch with the last month dropping off the end.

That month had 30 days.  Julius thought his month should be one of the longest so he took a day from February and added it to July, giving July 31 days and February 29 days.

When Augustus came along, he wanted a month of his own. He couldn’t be ahead of Julius so he took the next month and named it August.

Like Julius, he shoved the other months down and another one dropped off the end. That month had 31 days. Augustus wouldn’t be outdone by Julius so he took another day out of poor February and added it to August.

February then had 28 days. We lost 31 and gained 30, for a new total of 365 days.

No, I haven’t been carrying all this information around with me since fifth grade; I found most of it on “Askville by Amazon.”

 

… Roy Hodge  

Wrestling season closes with 1 state champ, three medal winners

By Dan Farfaglia

Last weekend at the Times Union Center in Albany, top high school wrestlers from around New York state assembled to determine who were the best in each weight class for the 2013-2014 season.

Six wrestlers from Oswego County representing Section 3 competed in the two state tournaments.

Fulton`s Mitch Woodworth and Travis Race participated in Division One and Mexico`s Theo Powers, Jake Woolson, Austin Whitney and Trevor Allard took part in Division Two.

Wearing the uniform of their high schools in the medal rounds, four of them placed in this prestigious event, thereby earning a spot at the winners` podium.

The biggest story that came out of the State Capitol is Mexico`s Trevor Allard. He became the first State Champion from his high school in its history.

At 160 pounds, he shocked all of his competitors in his weight class by defeating the number one ranked wrestler, Alex Smythe of Section 6, in the second round of wrestling, in triple overtime. He also won in overtime again, this time over Section 2`s Conner Lawrence in the finals to secure the state wrestling crown.

An enthusiastic Trevor had this to say: “Winning the state tournament exceeded all of my expectations this season. Going into the tournament, all I expected of myself was to wrestle hard and leave it all out on the mat, and if I did, that it’s all I could do … I had been to the tournament so many times before as a spectator, and I knew that even as an 8th seed, anything was possible!”

Earlier in the tournament, Allard defeated Dan Khomitch from Section 5 by a score of 10-4 and also won over Section 4`s Nik Hanson 4-3 in the semi-finals.

Trevor’s teammates, Theo Powers finished in 3rd at 106 pounds and Jake Woolson placed 4th at 170 pounds.

Mexico Wrestling Coach Bill Kays has just completed one of the most successful seasons in his career as a coach.

“All four of our guys wrestled very well and it was nice to see 3 out of 4 on the podium … I felt great for Trevor because he has worked very hard for many years and to be there when he accomplished his dream was a very gratifying feeling” said Kays.

Kays is the recipient of the 2013 – 2014 Section 3 Division 2`s “Coach of the Year” Award.

In Division One, wrestling at 120 pounds, Mitch Woodworth became the third Fulton wrestler in the last decade to earn a medal at this event. He took home 5th place honors.

He got to this point in the tournament by defeating Isaiah Colgan of Section 4 by a 4-3 score in the first round. He lost to the eventual tournament runner up in round two, but then won by a score of 1-0 in double overtime over Section 6`s Donny McCoy, thereby guaranteeing himself a medal.

He lost in his next match to the eventual winner of the 3rd place prize, Benjamin Lamantia from the Catholic Schools Section. He concluded his junior year by pinning Dominic Inzana of Section 2 in the first period.

Of all of the competitors at this tournament this year who hailed from Oswego County, none of them were seniors.

Mexico`s Theo Powers is a sophomore and Fulton’s Travis Race is only a freshman. All the others are juniors. So it`s quite possible that some of these wrestlers may be returning to the NYS tournament again next year.

After having the success he just had, Trevor Allard is wasting no time getting ready for the 2014-2015 season, he concluded: “My plans for next year are to work even harder than I did this year … I hope to be back on top of the NYS podium with a few of my teammates.”

VALLEY VIEWPOINTS: A giving boy, Red Cross Month

A giving boy

A few years ago, a picture and a brief article in The Valley News told us about a young man named Michael Doney, who decided that on his birthday he wanted to give presents rather than receive them.

He wanted to make his birthday special for others.

We were so impressed that someone so young would think of others rather himself on his day of celebration. Subsequently, we interviewed Mikey, his dad Michael, his mother Renee and his brother Walker (when we could slow him down) for an article in The Valley News to tell others about this amazing youngster.

Mikey recently celebrated his 9th birthday, deciding that this year he would make a donation to the Golisano Hospital.  Once again, we were moved and are writing again to tell of his generosity.

The list of items that Mikey brought to the hospital were as follows: 11 boxes of kids’ Band-Aids, three baby rattles, two baby teethers, five coloring books, six sets of crayons, two card games, four activity books, two puzzles, 13 $5 Tim Horton’s gift cards and $70 in cash that was turned into gift cards to be used at the Cold Stone Creamery Ice Cream shop at the children’s hospital.

The gift cards go to families to buy ice cream and coffee for parents.

Once again, we want to wish Mikey a very happy birthday and thank him for his unselfishness in thinking of others.

We should all take example of what it truly means to be giving.

Bob & Sandy Weston

Fulton

Red Cross Month

It’s Red Cross Month and we would like to recognize our Everyday Heroes who reach out to help their neighbors when they are in need.

These everyday heroes are our volunteers who help disaster victims get on the road to recovery. They give blood to help someone in the hospital.

They brighten the day of an injured service member in a hospital far from home. They take our classes and step forward to help someone having a heart attack or to save a drowning child.

March is also a great time to become part of the Red Cross. It’s easy. Household members can work together on a preparedness plan. People can sign up to take a class or volunteer their time. They can give blood or make a financial donation.

The Red Cross responds to nearly 70,000 disasters a year in this country. It provides 24-hour support to members of the military, veterans and their families; collects and distributes about 40 percent of the nation’s blood supply and trains millions of people in first aid, water safety and other life-saving skills every year.

This year so far in Oswego County, the American Red Cross of CNY responded to 12 local emergencies, assisted 3 military families and trained 45 people in lifesaving skills.

Red Cross Month is observed in dedication of everyone who supports our mission. We are grateful to people for their generosity which enables us to continue our work, and encourage everyone to become an Everyday Hero during Red Cross Month by helping their neighbors.

Danielle D. Hayden

Manager

Oswego Chapter of the American Red Cross

OPINION: It’s Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

By Debra J. Groom

I was reading through some things on my desk and came across a notice that March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

I thought I would toss in my few cents on this subject in hopes of getting a bunch of Oswego County residents off their keisters to get their colons checked out.

The best screening available for colon cancer is the colonoscopy. Yeah, I know, the dreaded colonoscopy. There may be a few of you reading this saying to yourself “Hey, no one is going to put a scope up, well, you know where.”

But listen. It really isn’t that bad. And if it can save you from dying from colon cancer, I’d say, go for it.

I have had five colonoscopies. Colon cancer and colon problems run in my family. Both of my grandfathers had colon cancer. One died from it (back in 1944, before there were the tests and treatments we have today). The other was cured, but he lived with a colostomy for the rest of his life.

My mother had problems with benign colon polyps and my sister has had colon difficulties too. So you can bet your bottom I don’t miss a colonoscopy.

The Centers for Disease Control says colon cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. It also is the second-leading cause of death from cancer for men and women combined in the United States.

In 2010 (the most recent year numbers are available), 131,607 people in the United States were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, including 67,700 men and 63,907 women.

A total of 52,045 people in the United States died from colorectal cancer, including 27,073 men and 24,972 women.

But here is the most important statement from CDC:

“Screening can find precancerous polyps — abnormal growths in the colon or rectum — so that they can be removed before turning into cancer. Screening also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment often leads to a cure. About nine out of every 10 people whose colorectal cancers are found early and treated appropriately are still alive five years later.”

Are you convinced yet?

Well, while the colonoscopy sounds yucky, it really isn’t that bad.

You spend the day before on a liquid diet, which leads to ravenous hunger. But hey, it’s only one day.

You drink some bad-tasting stuff the night before the procedure that makes you spend much of the next few hours on the porcelain throne. But you have to clean out that colon so the doctor can get some clean, pretty pictures.

That part — called the prep — is actually the worst part. And think about it, isn’t it worth it to go through a few hours of discomfort to live to a ripe old age with your colon in tact?

The test itself, I have found, is a breeze. I have always been totally knocked out by the anesthesia — I’ve never felt a thing. After, you lay in the recovery room for a bit, talk to your doctor to see what they found and then off you go. Most people can eat a regular meal not too long after the test is over.

Even with my extensive family history, I have this done only once every five years.

Of course, people should always mention any symptoms they have to their doctors immediately. The CDC lists the symptoms as blood in or on your stool (bowel movement, stomach pain, aches, cramps that don’t go away and losing weight when you don’t know why.

So if you have any symptoms or you’re over 50 and just want to be checked out, celebrate this month by see a gastroenterologist and having a colonoscopy.

I think that’s a small price to pay for life.

Fulton man charged with making meth

A 37-year-old Fulton man was arrested by Oswego police March 4 for a felony count of manufacturing methamphetamine in the third degree.

Ronald E. Recore, of 107 Highland St., Fulton, also was charged with a misdemeanor county of petit larceny for allegedly stealing a Rite Aid brand instant cold compress from the MidTown Plaza earlier in the day.

Oswego police said instant cold compresses contain ammonium nitrate, an ingredient used in the “one pot” method of making methamphetamine.

Recore was arrested after a car he was in was stopped by Oswego Police on East Ninth Street. As a safety precaution, East Ninth Street between East Bridge Street and East Cayuga Street was closed off to all traffic while Oswego City Fire Department stood by on scene.

Recore was being held in jail pending his arraignment. The investigation is continuing and further arrests are likely.

As always, Oswego City Police are asking anyone with information regarding this or any other illegal drug activity to contact them at 342-2283. Individuals wishing to remain anonymous may also contact the Oswego City Police Departments tip-line at 342-8131, or email crimewatch@oswegony.org

Lake Ontario water levels lower for 2014

By Debra J. Groom

Early estimates show water levels in Lake Ontario may be a bit lower in 2014 through June than they were in 2013.

A briefing on Great Lakes water levels given this week by the Army Corps of Engineers stated levels for February are 4 inches above last year for the month and near the long-term average for February.

But, long-range forecasts show through May, the lake’s level should be about 2 inches below last year and 2 inches to 4 inches below the long-range average through May.

The level is forecast at 3 inches below average in June and 5 inches to 7 inches below the long-range average in June.

So what does this mean?

Well, right now, no one knows for sure.

Cathy Goodnough is president of the Sandy Pond Channel Maintenance Association, which is charged with keeping an eye on water levels in the Sandy Pond area and ensuring the channel between the pond and the lake is open for boaters.

She said the area still has to see what the ice melt and snow runoff from the areas east of the lake do to the water levels. She said there was so much ice in January the Sandy Pond area flooded.

“We have 24 inches of ice here right now and we got a lot of snow,” she said Thursday.

One positive is the ice buildup at the Sandy Pond area. Goodnough said the channel between Sandy Pond and the lake close dup in January and the ice formation sucked a lot of water and sand out of the channel.

Last summer lake water levels fluctuated from being a little above average to a little below average, with Goodnough characterizing it as not a disaster, but not perfect either.

Residents of the lake shoreline have seen some bad times in previous years, with water levels so low they couldn’t get watr lines in or use their boats.

The International Joint Commission, consisting of U.S. and Canadian officials, regulate Lake Ontario water levels throughout the summer.

The cold and snow of this winter has caused near record conditions on the Great Lakes.

As of March 4, 91 percent of the Great Lakes’ surface was iced over. The lake with the most open water is Lake Ontario, which is ony 43 percent covered by ice.

The Army Corps of Engineers said the only year with more Great Lakes ice was 1979, when they were 94.7 percent ice covered.

Officials said extensive ice cover cuts down on lake water evaporation, so Lake Ontario is open to more water evaporation than the other lakes.

Your hometown. Your news.