Newton George Ward, Navy vet, owned Ward’s Service Station, sold Coca-Cola

Newton “Newt” George Ward, 87, passed away on Saturday, March 8, 2014, from complications of a recent surgery.

Newt was born in Lysander, NY on April 1, 1926. There was not a more appropriate day than April Fool’s Day for Newt to be brought in to this world. His constant humor and ability to make anyone laugh was undeniable.

Newt attended school in Fulton, NY.  He was a proud member of the Drum and Bugle Corp.

After falsifying his age, with his father’s permission, he joined the US Navy in 1942 at the age of 16. He served on the USS Abele and USS Hilarity, holding a rank of Motor Machinist Mate Third Class.

He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, the American Theatre Medal, the Asiatic Pacific Medal and the Victory Medal during his service in the Navy. He received an honorable discharge March 25, 1946.

Throughout his life, Newt worked for various employers. One of his most memorable jobs was working as a salesman for Coca-Cola.

Newt loved to share with friends and family his success story of “outselling all route salesmen for the red Coca-Cola coolers” in 1954. In the small community of Fulton, 22 of the 23 service stations held Ward-sold red coolers for Coca-Cola. His gift of gab, work ethic and tenacity ensured his success in sales.

In addition, Newt operated the Mobil Gas Station, named Ward’s Service Station in Fulton, NY. He was always proud of the service he provided the Fulton community. He also enjoyed the flexibility this provided him to disappear for something very important, such as a good card game or exciting craps game.

Upon closing of Ward’s service station, Newt began his journey as a proud Teamster at Fiddler, the Oswego steam station and Nine Mile. He retired in 1991 as the Teamster steward.

Newt was a staunch union man and had no problems sharing his opinions on that issue. Shortly after retirement, Newt returned to the world of employment.

He was a truck driver for New Penn Golf Carts for several years. He not only knew where every diner was in New York, but where every golf course was as well.

At a young age, Newt had a passion for car racing. He was a frequent driver at The Oswego Speedway.

Newt’s impact on the local racing community still exists today. Driving the infamous polka dotted car, number 8, he won the Opening Night Feature at the Oswego Speedway in 1953.

This led to his love for NASCAR racing, always cheering for Dale Earnhardt Jr. In addition, Newt truly enjoyed a game of chance, whether it involved football, cards, horses or dice. Those who were able to join him at a casino could admire his ability to brave the odds – sometimes with success, sometimes not.

Knowing that so many of his friends and family supported Syracuse Athletics and the Yankee Baseball Club, he religiously watched every SU basketball and football game and NY Yankee game, always cheering for the opposing team.  The sole purpose of this was to be the first to mention an SU or Yankee loss to their fans.

Newt could always be heard repeating some of his famous lines such as “This isn’t my first rodeo,”  “Darlene Who?” or pointing to his head stating “What do you think?  This is just for holding a hat”?

Many moons ago, he was known to be in a bar stating, “When Newt Ward drinks, everybody drinks, which led to drinks being poured for all in the place, then when he finished his drink he said “When Newt Ward pays, everybody pays.”

We have been told he then had to quickly exit the bar.

Newt could also be found at Mimi’s Diner for breakfast nearly every morning.  He found one of the advantages of aging was the ability to flirt with the waitresses without being charged with harassment.

He always had a way to make whoever was waiting on him believe she was his favorite. The family would like to thank each and every waitress at Mimi’s for all of the joy and laughter they brought to him and taking care of him like he was their dad.

Newt had a lifelong love for chocolate and ice cream. He would always pick an extra large banana split over any nutritional meal. His family and friends could always plan on a nightly trip to Carvels, Byrne Dairy or The Big Dipper.

His wit, stories and sense of humor were unparalleled. This could often be verified by some of his closest friends, Randy Perry, Norm (Sparky) Bovay, Fred Bevacqua, Dick Clark and Gerry Allen.

Newt lived his life on his own terms.  He lived large, loved large and left a large legacy behind.

Newt is predeceased by his parents, Newton Nutting Ward and Genevieve (Horr) Ward, his brothers Jack and Elmer and his sister Blanche (Ward) Brewer.

Newt is survived by his wife Ann (Anabel) Ward; children, Deborah (Dick Campbell) Ely, and Connie Ward both of Fulton, Steve (Sue) Ward of Albany, Dan (Sandy) Shue, Shelly (Randy) Allen and Tammy (Blake) Bednarz; sister Rhoda Brown; and former wife, Barbara Stowell Nastasi, all of Fulton. He is also survived by his grandchildren Matthew, Brittany, Jocelyn, Christina, Jessica, Valentina, Kimberly, Courtney, Anna and Blake; niece, Judy (Bud) Young; nephews, Jim Mangano and Randy Brown. He also leaves behind his beloved dog, Chuck.

His family is very thankful for the love and care he received from the staff of St. Luke Rehabilitation Facility, St. Francis Living Facility and St. Joseph’s Hospital Staff on Unit 2-5 and Unit 1-8.

Calling hours are from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 12 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton, NY. Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 13, at Foster Funeral Home, Fulton.

If Newt has touched your life and you would like to share a memory at his funeral service please let one of his children know.

Contributions in memory of Mr. Ward may be made to the animal rescue organization, Paws Across Oswego County, 2035 County Route 1, Oswego, NY 13126.

Faculty, staff unions at CCC form new group

Faculty and staff at Cayuga Community College have united to form a new organization called United Cayuga Professionals.

Group officials say this organization was formed to facilitate transparency and clear communications within the college, while working on positive initiatives to bolster the work and learning environment for all at the Auburn and Fulton campuses.

United Cayuga Professionals combines members from the four unions which represent workers at the college, including the Faculty Association, the Administrative Professionals Group, the Educational Support Professionals, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 932-C .

Organizers say the need for the group grew out of the frustrations experienced after the college struggled with a budget deficit last spring, which led to the College’s Board of Trustees declaring a state of financial exigency, staff reductions, and the resignation of the CCC president.

They say the primary mission of United Cayuga Professionals is to promote a unified voice representing all workers to the college’s administration, Board of Trustees and the community.

“Our intention is to get all the employees of the college working together as a larger unit to make a better place for our students and for our employees,” said Doug Brill, one of the founding members of United Cayuga Professionals and a member of the Administrative Professionals Group.

“Our first full group meeting was a way for many workers to begin healing,” said United Cayuga Professionals founding member Professor Dia Carabajal.

“We suddenly found ourselves in a crisis, no one knew who to be upset with, so we’re hoping this group will help us build relationships that would stand if we face a crisis again,” Carabajal said.

“As a member of the Educational Support Professionals group and the United Cayuga Professionals committee, I would like to see the members of the four unions work together to become more of a solid unified workforce here at the college,” said Patricia Hamberger, senior typist.

“Morale issues are also on the forefront of everyone’s mind as well.  I have always been proud to be an employee here and would like to feel that way again,” she said.

“I think the four unions working together only makes sense and will be beneficial for the college,” said Henry D’Amato, mechanic and a founding member representing the Mechanics and Custodial Unit.

Already the group has experienced success.

Founding member E. Bruce Walter says CCC’s Board of Trustees has agreed to have a representative from each union participate on the search committee for a new college president.

They also hosted a guest speaker in December. Robert Freeman, executive director of the New York Department of State’s Committee on Open Government, gave a presentation to the group on open meeting laws and the Freedom of Information Act.

“We’re committed to learning together so we can help facilitate open and clear communication among all of the College’s constituents and the College’s Board of Trustees,” said Carabajal.

Nine Mile 2 down again

Nine Mile Point Unit 2 automatically shut down at about 4:30 p.m. Monday when a worker inadvertently contacted a highly sensitive plant component. All safety systems responded as designed and the plant went offline as expected, safely and without incident.

This issue is unrelated to last week’s shutdown, which was caused by an electrical equipment failure.

Nine Mile Point’s reactor protection system uses highly sensitive equipment to monitor a host of plant conditions and components, constantly looking for signs of a potential issue. When an anomaly is identified, the system is designed to automatically shut down the reactor. 

Station operators informed the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and state officials of the issue. The temporary shutdown does not present a risk to public health and safety and is not expected to impact electrical service to homes and businesses in the region. 

Nine Mile Point 1 and 2 are owned and run by Constellation Energy Nuclear Group.

Nine Mile 2 back on line

Constellation Energy Nuclear Group’s Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 2 is back online and achieved 100 percent yesterday afternoon.

Station personnel completed necessary repairs and post-maintenance testing in order to return the unit to service.

The plant had been safely shutdown on Tuesday due to an on-site electrical component failure on the non-nuclear side of the plant.

2 events set for FMC

During March, the Fulton Medical Center will be the site of two health-related events.

Blood Drive

The Fulton Medical Center will host an American Red Cross blood drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 12 in the healthcare facility’s lower level conference room.

Members of the public are encouraged to donate a pint of blood during the drive. To make an appointment, call 592-3505. Walk-ins are also welcome.

Those donating a pint of blood are asked to use the Park Street entrance.

Caring and Sharing Breast Cancer 

Support Group

Members of the caring and sharing breast cancer support group will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 18 in the community room of Oswego Health’s Fulton Medical Center.

Community members diagnosed with breast cancer can be guided through their journey of treatment by members of the support group. The local support group meets the third Tuesday of the month.

In addition to the support group, its members can provide a facilitator 24 hours a day to those that need support before the next meeting.

Liz Schremp, who coordinates the support group, can be contacted by calling 592-7468.

Those attending the support group meeting are asked to use the Park Street entrance to the Fulton Medical Center.            -

Free cancer screening health fair March 11 in Central Square

A free cancer screening health fair will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 11 at Oswego Health’s Central Square Medical Center.

Oswego Health and Oswego County Opportunities Cancer Services Program have teamed up to offer this event that is open to the public.

The event is being held as part of the two health partners activities in March, which is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

At the health fair, free take-home FIT tests, which screen for colon cancer will be available to those age 50 to 64.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths. It is recommended that all men and women, age 50 or older be screened for colorectal cancer.

Other screenings at the health fair will include free mammograms for those who are uninsured or who meet certain income criteria.

To learn more about eligibility or to make a mammogram appointment, call 592-0830. Free clinical breast exams will also be offered at the health fair.

In addition, health fair participants can take advantage of free bone density screenings, as well as learn more about the health plans available through the New York State Marketplace and about the Healthy Cooking Connections Program, which is open to those with a chronic disease and provides free weekly food boxes to those who take part in nutrition classes.

Healthy free refreshments will also be offered to those who attend the cancer screening health fair.

The Central Square Medical Center is located at 3045 East Avenue (Route 49) in the village of Central Square.

For more information, call Carolyn Handville at Oswego County Opportunities at 592-0830.

THE SPORTSMAN’S WORLD: Will March go out like a lamb?

By Leon Archer

The old saying is, if March comes in like a Lion, it will go out like a lamb, and conversely, if March comes in like a lamb, it will go out like a lion.

If there is any truth to that, the end of the month should be pretty darned good.

In the meantime, there is plenty of ice for the ice fishermen and probably way too much snow and ice for the steelhead fishermen. Both the ice fisherman and the steelheader are a hardy breed.

The conditions on the streams and rivers should be much more conducive for catching those big trout as March slowly starts to mellow. I never fished for them much until April arrived, but once the weather started to get warm enough to tempt me to wet a line, I caught some nice ones.

Fact is, the really good steelhead fishing started on the Salmon River and other area streams after I had nearly given up fishing in the coldest months. I guess I had become a wimp.

I was trying to remember years when March was a docile as a summer night. I don’t have any dates in my head, but sweet thing’s birthday comes on March 27, and I remember us having a picnic on her birthday one year when the temperature was 75 degrees and the daffodils had been in blossom for at least a week and a half before.

I also collected sap a number of years with my father-in-law, Harvey Yerdon, when the ground was getting mostly bare before the end of March, and the maple season was nearly over.

With temperatures finally giving us a little break, it looks like the maple syrup season should be up and running.

Harvey always said there were a few things you needed for a good syrup season. They were: thawing days and freezing nights, snow on the ground – preferably with several crusts – rain, and reasonably calm days.

The season lasted longer if the weather didn’t warm up too much, too quickly. I think the conditions are pretty good this year for a better than average syrup season, but I’m really not much better at predicting the weather than Punxsutawney Phil, so who knows?

One thing is certain, spring always comes. I am a great fan of spring. I like fishing the streams before the rocks have become too slippery for an old guy like me.

I live for the tug of a bullhead at the end of my line on a warm night on Sandy Pond. I take great pleasure in picking up a couple hundred night crawlers on a damp evening. I even enjoy just sitting outside and listening to the spring peepers.

And I love the smell of spring, the odor of promise of great days to come.

After this winter, just about anything March has to offer is going to look good.

I’m hoping for a good bullhead season. My favorite fish is likely still snoring away safely tucked into a soft bottom underneath the ice, but as soon as the sun gets higher, the water starts to warm and the ice gets rotten, his alarm clock will go off. I’ll be waiting for Mr. Whiskers.

Nothing brings back memories any stronger than sitting beside a gas lantern, listening to the frogs and peepers, hoping to see my rod tip jump as a bullhead takes the bait. My father and I passed many pleasant night hours together in friendly competition at the expense of Mr. Whiskers.

It doesn’t get much better than that. It gets my heart pumping just thinking about it.

Yep, I love the spring.

Fulton Squirts team wins JAM tourney

The Fulton Squirt Hockey team sponsored by Chris Nelson Insurance, Fulton Lions Club and Fulton Medical Center took first place in their end of the season league championship JAM tournament. Fulton beat Onondaga in the championship game 3-1 to take the title. Trey White was stellar between the pipes and had many saves. Fulton’s offense kept pressure on Onondaga’s defense for three periods. The forwards were led by Jon Dingman, Brady Zych, Tanner Tetro, Fred White, Caden Waldau, Lucas Nelson, Josh Cook and Nicolas Schremp.  Defensively the team played its best game of the tournament and were led by Logan McDougall, Adam Cooney, Courtney Bednarz, Gino Noel and Andrew Coleman. In the photo are: front Caden Waldau and Trey White, second row Courtney Bednarz, Fred White, Jon Dingman, Brady Zych and Tanner Tetro, third row Andrew Coleman, Gino Noel, Logan McDougall, Lucas Nelson, Adam Cooney, Nicolas Schremp and Josh Cook. Coaches left to right Jamie Tetro, Jeff Schremp and Joe White

3-8_SPORTSfultonsquirts

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