Fulton Midgets hockey advance to state championships

Submitted by Anna Clarke

The Fulton Midget hockey team, sponsored by Dunkin Donuts and B&T Sports, topped Mohawk Valley 5-2 in its recent sectional tournament to advance to the Tier III 18U State Championships.

The team also fell to Cortland 2-3 and Valley 1-2.  Here is a recap of the tournament:

Fulton 2, Cortland 3

The Flames dominated early in the game, scoring three times by the end of period one. After a scoreless second period, Raider Nick Meyer took a feed from Matt Billion and netted one from the top of the circle.

With less than a minute on the clock, A.J. Pendell sent the puck over the goalie’s pad, Trae Sheldon assisting.

Keegan Murphy stopped 36 shots in net for Fulton

Fulton 1, Valley 2

Following a scoreless first period, Fulton’s Cameron Clarke scored with a backhand shot, thanks to a passing play between Will Fruce and Kaiden Hotchkiss.

Valley responded with one of their own, to tie. Valley’s goal early in the third stanza was the game winner, handing the Raiders their second one point loss of the tournament.

Murphy turned aside 26 shots for the Raiders.

Fulton 5, Mohawk Valley 2

Adam Croteau lit up the scoreboard for Fulton, skating the puck in and netting it unassisted. The Raiders ended the second stanza with a three-point lead, first with Bryce Knight landing a shot, Sheldon and Croteau assisting, then with Croteau making good on Ryan Ross’s rebound.

Mohawk Valley narrowed the gap by one at the start of the third. Fulton’s Pendell responded with a goal scored on an end to end rush.

Mohawk Valley added one more point before Pendell tallied his third goal of the tournament, Sheldon and Croteau credited with the assist.

Murphy made 38 stops in net for Fulton.

The Fulton Midget hockey team will compete against the Louisville, Great Neck and Mohawk Valley18U teams in the New York State Midget Championships in Amherst March 14-16.

THE SPORTSMAN’S WORLD: Watching the Snow Belt

By Leon Archer

As I write this week’s column, I am warmed by the sunshine pouring through my westward facing window.

I was just outside pruning some bushes and cleaning up the yard, and I noted the grass needs mowing. The daffodils are in full bloom and the maple trees are budded with their bright red blossoms already starting to shrivel up after the bees have done their work.

The thermometer tells me it is 63 degrees and it is 4:30 in the afternoon. That’s the way it is in Sammamish, Washington.

I check the weather in Oswego County nearly every day, and even though there was another snow storm this week, there appear to be signs that winter is starting to lose its grip.

No one will be picking up night crawlers right away, but they might be starting to stir deep underground. This is the time of year that I would be running a trap line when I was back in high school, and I can remember the weather bouncing around a lot in March.

I would pop out of bed about 4:30 in the morning, slip on my clothes and head out for the line. Some mornings were decent, but often it would be cold, windy and snowing.

Later in the month, it might be raining, but no matter what the weather, traps had to be checked once every 24 hours.

It was pretty good exercise, but if I figured what I made on average for the time I put in, trapping was a losing proposition. I enjoyed trapping, and if I ignored the hours I put in (which I always did.) the money was nice to have, and I knew I had earned it.

A few of my friends trapped also, but I don’t think any of them worked harder at it than I did.

April was always the better month for muskrat trapping, especially for me since most of my trapping was on streams, large and small.

Ice and snow made trapping streams like Sandy Creek difficult and provided poor returns, but when things warmed up a bit the rats would really be moving and I caught quite a few. An added bonus was that I could run my traps on Sandy Creek a second time, after school, and do some trout fishing at the same time.

Of course, April meant I was able to pick up night crawlers at least by mid–month and do some bullhead fishing at night. My schedule got pretty hectic in April; I loved it though.

Sometime in the hustle-bustle each day, I had to skin my trapping catch, flesh them, and stretch them, and if I had caught any bullheads the night before, they needed to be dressed as well. I was tired when I went to bed.

Oh yes, I forgot to mention, my parents also insisted that I get my homework done for school, no excuses.

So I sit here in Sammamish, envying you for what’s coming up, but being glad that I’m here right now enjoying the early spring while Oswego County snow keeps flying.

However, as I look back on the many years I have spent in Oswego County, and the winters I plodded through, I don’t believe I would rather have grown up anywhere else in the world.

I’ll be back before too long now, and if a late spring snowstorm should greet me, I’ll grin and bear it. I sure am looking forward to the fishing.

Robert “Bob” Hughes, WWII veteran, longtime printer

3-15_OBIThughesRobert “Bob” Hughes, 89, of Fair Haven, passed away on March 8, 2014 with his family by his side in Syracuse, NY.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife and best friend of 65 years, Betsy Hughes; his children, Robin (John) Thomas of Seattle, WA, Debbie (Ralph) Stamp of Cleveland, NY,  Jody (Marty) Satalin of Syracuse, NY,  Scott (Maureen) Hughes of Clinton, NY; 10 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren.

Bob grew up on the South Side of Syracuse and led a colorful childhood, and often recounted stories of selling newspapers on the street corner he bought and setting up pins at the local bowling alley.

His family later moved to Fulton, NY, where he attended Fulton High School and was a multi-sport athlete until 1942 when he enlisted and served as a Navy Pharmacist’s Mate in the Asiatic Pacific.

Upon returning as a WWII veteran, he completed his high school degree and soon met his wife, Betsy Miller of Baldwinsville, NY.

Bob was a devoted husband and loving father while raising four children with Betsy in Lysander, NY and spending summers in their beloved Fair Haven.

Bob led a successful career in the printing industry, starting at Sealright Co. and ultimately retiring as vice president of sales from Sonoco Flexible Packaging (formerly Morrill Press) in 1996.

He and Betsy moved to Fair Haven year-round, enjoying its beauty and volunteering in various village activities, including being a founding member of the Save our Fourth Association (S.O.F.A.).

Well-known and loved by all for his charming wit and humorous jokes, Bob will be missed by family and countless friends.

A memorial service celebrating his life will be held at the convenience of the family at a future date. Arrangements are being handled by Traub Funeral Home.

Contributions may be made in Bob’s memory to S.O.F.A., P. O. Box 13, Fair Haven, NY 13064.

Please visit www.traub.com for On-Line Guest Book.

Gregory A. Case, corrections officer, loved outdoors

3-15_OBITcaseGregory A. Case, 55, of Red Creek, passed away on Tuesday, March 11 at Auburn Community Hospital after a brief illness and a long battle with multiple sclerosis.

He was a graduate of Red Creek Central High School, class of 1977.

Greg retired in 1998 as a corrections officer after 15 years at Butler Correctional Facility in Red Creek, Auburn Correctional Facility and Watertown Correctional Facility.

He loved the outdoors including camping, hunting and fishing.

Surviving are his wife of seven years, Melody Webster Case of Red Creek; children, Christine (Michael) Harrison, Jr. of Oneida and Steven Case of Red Creek; a grandson, Cameron Harrison; parents, Allen “Pete” and Joan Case of Martville; siblings, Jeffrey (Kathleen) Case of Albany, Cynthia (Steven) Keeling of Martville and Amy (Daisy Curcie) Case of North Syracuse; brothers and sisters-in-law, Kristine (Tim) Lozier of Fair Haven, Holley (Steven) Goolding of Fair Haven, Brenda Webster of Queensbury and Wendy Webster of Auburn; mother-in-law, Nancy Webster of Fair Haven; several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

The family wishes to thank special care givers, Taylar Smalling, Donald Hartley, Mickey Jeffers, Laura Lozier and Susan Wheaton.

Calling hours are from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 15 (today) at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St., Hannibal with services immediately following.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts are encouraged to be made to Multiple Sclerosis Resources of CNY, 6743 Kinne St., East Syracuse, NY 13057.

Esther Irland, loved to ‘whoop it up’

Esther Irland passed away quietly on Monday, March 10 at the age of 86.

She had spent that day surrounded by her family and succumbed to complications from a merciless series of health issues.

Esther was predeceased her husband Bruce Irland, who died in 1986.

She is survived by her sons, Gary and Phillip as well as seven grandchildren and 10great grandchildren whom she adored.

Esther was known to ride (fast) on snowmobiles, motorcycles and boats as well as “cutting a mean rug” and whooping it up whenever possible. She was loved by all who knew her and will be sorely missed.

There will be a celebration of Esther’s life on Thursday, March 20 at the I.O.O.B. (International Order of Old Bastards) Club, 1170 Sand Hill Road, Martville, NY starting at 3 pm. Snacks and refreshments will be provided. Pictures and stories are welcome.

If you would like to make a contribution in Esther’s name to the Humane Society, she would have liked that.

Oswego native’s photo on display in Caz

McDonald’s Restaurant in Cazenovia is displaying a selection of photographs by Cazenovia College student and Oswego native Brittany Juravich, now through May 1, 2014.

“My work represents thoughts and ideas of my imagination,” said Juravich, a photography major. “I am able to make sense of the inner workings of my mind and create my own fantasy world where anything can happen through photography.”

Sarah Stonefoot, assistant professor and director of the Photography Program at Cazenovia College, has high praise for her student’s artwork.

“Using the photographic medium to its full potential, Brittany’s photographs delve into the world of dreams,” Stonefoot said. “Her strong control over technique makes the viewer ever more eager to believe that the world she presents is the one in which we should believe.”

Cazenovia College’s Studio Art–Photography Program is professionally geared to prepare the next generation of photographic image makers with broad knowledge and experience of photographic techniques and concepts. The photography concentration prepares students for careers in photo journalism, fine art photography, and commercial photography, or for further study in graduate school.

Students enjoy working in Cazenovia’s state-of-the-art photo facilities located in Reisman Hall, and taking studio courses such as Studio Photography, Alternative Processes, Color Photo, On Assignment, and Large Format Photography,  as well as Digital Imaging, Portfolio Preparation, and a Photography Internship.

Salmon River center displays student art

The Salmon River Fine Arts Center in Pulaski will be exhibiting student art work in support of two competitions representing students in Oswego County.

The first– the 2014 Oswego County Student Art Show and Competition — features artwork from students throughout Oswego County, including home-schooled students.

Selected students works representing grades 7 – 12 will be on display throughout the month of April, with opening reception to be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 6.

Awards to be presented include firt, second, third and honorable mentions in both the junior (grades 7, 8, 9) and senior (grades 10, 11, 12) categories.

Additional awards include Best of Show, Sally Deaton Memorial and Darcy Hilton Memorial Awards; with prizes valued at more than $500.

Simultaneously, — the Fine Arts Center will host the county-level competition for the 32nd Annual Congressional Art Competition – an Artistic Discovery, sponsored by the office of Congressman Richard L. Hanna, R-Barneveld, representing the 22nd Congressional District.

The six winners of this local exhibit will compete in the regional show at Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica May 3. The first place winner in the regional competition will have his or her artwork exhibited in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. for one year.

In addition, second- and third-place winners will have their work exhibited in Hanna’s district offices in Binghamton and Utica.

Cash prizes, donated by Hanna, will be awarded to the three finalists.

The Salmon River Fine Arts Center is a nonprofit organization committed to enriching our community by engaging the energy and creativity of local artists, by sharing and displaying fine arts, and by offering programs to enhance creativity and learning for the novice as well as the gifted artist.

Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

Call 298-7007 or go to www.SalmonRiverFineArtsCenter.com for more information. Also find the center at www.facebook.com/SalmonRiverFineArtsCenter.

Lakeside Artisans offers classes in making Easter egg ornaments

Lakeside Artisans, at 191 W. First St., in Oswego, is offering classes in making glass Easter egg ornaments.

The classes are from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 22 and 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday,  April 6.

Instructor Diane Chepko-Sade will bring in egg shaped cut-outs in glass, and decorative elements that students can use to make their own “Ukrainian style” Easter eggs.

After the students create their own designs and glue their decorations in place, the eggs will be fired in the kiln so they become permanently fused. A bale will be glued to the top of the egg so that it can be hung as a decoration to welcome Spring and celebrate Easter.

There is a limit of eight students in each class. Chepko-Sade will accept children more than 6 years old in the class if they are accompanied by an adult.

The class fee, including materials and firing, is $45.

There is a non-refundable registration fee, which will be deducted from the class fee, of $10 to sign up for the class.

For more information on how to register for the class, call 342-8880, go to lakesideartisans.com or visit us on Facebook.

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