Judges named for business plan contest

The panel of judges has been secured for The Next Great Idea 2014 Oswego County Business Plan Competition, said Austin Wheelock, economic development specialist for Operation Oswego County and co-chair of Next Great Idea.

“The Next Great Idea is the result of business and community leaders joining together to launch a competition that encourages entrepreneurs to commit to new business development in Oswego County and offers a $25,000 prize to help make a dream come true,” Wheelock said.

Judges for the event are Jeff Grimshaw of the SUNY Oswego Office of Business and Community Relations; Adam Gagas of Breakwall Asset Management; Kimberly Steele of the Steele Law Firm; Shane Broadwell of the Broadwell Hospitality Group; John Sharkey IV of Universal Metal; Sue Witmer of Cayuga Community College Fulton Campus; Mike Quenville of Pathfinder Bank; John Fitzgibbons, owner of the Fitzgibbons Agency; Atom Avery, local entrepreneur and owner of Avery Rental Properties & The Beacon Hotel; and Laurie O’Brien, owner of Port City Café & Red Sun Fire Roasting Co.

Judges were selected based on their local business knowledge and expertise in the fields of operations, management, financing, and entrepreneurship.

The first phase of the 2014 NGI Competition is underway and the deadline for submitting business concept proposals is April 11.

The entire competition will consist of three phases that will require semi-finalists selected from the first phase to develop full business plans and, in the third phase, finalists will make their “pitch” in person to the panel of judges.

This panel will determine which proposals will be selected to enter the subsequent phases culminating in the winner being chosen and honored at a luncheon Nov. 13.

Ideas that are not selected will receive written feedback from the judges of how to improve their proposals for the future.

The event web site, www.oswegocounty.org/NGI, includes an overview of the event, a competition timeline, guidelines, details on the $25,000 prize, sponsors, partners and contact information. In addition, the $25,000 can potentially be leveraged to borrow up to $250,000 in partnership with local banks, the Oswego County Industrial Development Agency, the cities of Oswego and Fulton community development offices, and the U.S. Small Business Administration.

SUNY Oswego students invited to participate in War of 1812 writing contest

SUNY Oswego students are invited to participate in the War of 1812 research paper competition in conjunction with the fourth annual Oswego War of 1812 Symposium Friday, April 4 to Sunday, April 6.

The symposium will be held at the Lake Ontario Event and Conference Center, 26 E. First St., Oswego.

The contest involves SUNY Oswego students writing and presenting their findings on any aspect of the War of 1812. All SUNY Oswego students are welcome to participate.

Students interested in competing must follow the requirements for the contest. The topic of the paper must be on some aspect of the War of 1812. There is no length requirement for the papers, but they must be able to be presented for at least 10 minutes.

All papers must be submitted by Monday, March 24 and several papers will be chosen to be presented Friday evening, April 4 at the symposium. Students whose papers are chosen to be presented at the symposium will have the chance to win up to $150.

SUNY Oswego students who register with Richard Weyhing of the History Department a week prior, will have the registration fee covered to the symposium.

“Students are the future of our history. It’s superb the history department at SUNY Oswego took a leadership role in making Oswego a heritage tourism destination by engaging in cooperative programming with other community organizations,” said Paul Lear, superintendent of Fort Ontario State Historic Site and chair of the Oswego War of 1812 Steering Committee.

“While the action at the new Lake Ontario Conference Center during the 1812 Symposium won’t approach that at the Carrier Dome during basketball season, students and other attendees will rub elbows with the legends of history and be at center court for their often intense differences of opinions on the activities and actions of the armies, navies, and individuals who fought in our own backyard.”

Richard Weyhing, an assistant professor of history at SUNY Oswego, is coordinating the contest with SUNY Oswego students.

“This is going to be a great event that brings together SUNY Oswego students, the local community, and a slate of outside scholars to explore Oswego’s and New York’s place within the broader history of the War of 1812,” he said.

For more information regarding the contest or to submit your paper, please contact Weyhing at Richard.weyhing@oswego.edu

Hot air balloon fest coming to Oswego County

A hot air balloon festival is coming to Oswego County in June.

Hot air balloons will take to the skies over the Sandy Creek Fairgrounds June 6, 7 and 8 at the Oswego County Balloon Festival. The event opens at 3 p.m. Friday, June 6, and closes with music by Frostbit Blue Sunday night, June 8.

There also will be plenty of action on solid ground with music, a petting zoo, crafts and vendors.

At least 10 hot balloons in a variety of styles are scheduled to fly, with balloon launches Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday morning, and Saturday and Sunday nights, weather permitting. After the sun sets Saturday evening, spectators will be treated to the sight of glimmering hot air balloons in flight during the “balloon glow” from 9 to 10 p.m.

The event is being organized by All Over Events of Pulaski, NY.

Fulton wrestling prepares for next season

By Rob Tetro

James Bailey and Travis Kemp recently wrestled their final matches in Fulton red and green.

As they move on to the next phases of their lives, they do so while having left their marks on the Fulton Wrestling Program.

Both athletes were four-year wrestlers for the Red Raiders. Varsity wrestling coach Chris Stalker said Bailey and Kemp were great leaders who taught their teammates the importance of hard work, dedication and determination.

As these athletes move toward life beyond high school, Stalker hopes they do so while having learned that hard work pays off. He also hopes Kemp and Bailey move on with the ability to understand what it means to be a part of a successful team — that success isn’t just a part of individual efforts, but rather it’s understanding just how much a team can accomplish when they work together.

While the Red Raiders begin preparing for the 2014-15 season, they do so having been able to get many younger wrestlers some experience at the varsity level this past season.

However, Stalker feels James Bailey’s example could be felt for years to come.

As a junior, Bailey didn’t have as much as success as he hoped he would. Despite the disappointment, Bailey worked hard over the offseason and continued to display his impressive work ethic throughout the season.

The end result was a very successful season, including solid performances in Sectional and State meets.

Stalker said his younger wrestlers know what it takes to succeed at a high level because Bailey led by example and had the success to show for it.

Looking ahead to next season, Stalker is excited about some of the younger athletes making their way up the ranks of the Fulton Wrestling Program.

He said this past season, his team had ninth-grader Travis Race qualify for the State Meet and 11th-grader Mitch Woodworth had a solid performance at the State meet.

Stalker expects these two athletes to serve as key leadership figures next season. He looks forward to seeing these two  lead by example like Bailey and Kemp did with the hopes that they too, will succeed while encouraging others to follow in their footsteps.

Fulton Midgets hockey advance to state championships

Submitted by Anna Clarke

The Fulton Midget hockey team, sponsored by Dunkin Donuts and B&T Sports, topped Mohawk Valley 5-2 in its recent sectional tournament to advance to the Tier III 18U State Championships.

The team also fell to Cortland 2-3 and Valley 1-2.  Here is a recap of the tournament:

Fulton 2, Cortland 3

The Flames dominated early in the game, scoring three times by the end of period one. After a scoreless second period, Raider Nick Meyer took a feed from Matt Billion and netted one from the top of the circle.

With less than a minute on the clock, A.J. Pendell sent the puck over the goalie’s pad, Trae Sheldon assisting.

Keegan Murphy stopped 36 shots in net for Fulton

Fulton 1, Valley 2

Following a scoreless first period, Fulton’s Cameron Clarke scored with a backhand shot, thanks to a passing play between Will Fruce and Kaiden Hotchkiss.

Valley responded with one of their own, to tie. Valley’s goal early in the third stanza was the game winner, handing the Raiders their second one point loss of the tournament.

Murphy turned aside 26 shots for the Raiders.

Fulton 5, Mohawk Valley 2

Adam Croteau lit up the scoreboard for Fulton, skating the puck in and netting it unassisted. The Raiders ended the second stanza with a three-point lead, first with Bryce Knight landing a shot, Sheldon and Croteau assisting, then with Croteau making good on Ryan Ross’s rebound.

Mohawk Valley narrowed the gap by one at the start of the third. Fulton’s Pendell responded with a goal scored on an end to end rush.

Mohawk Valley added one more point before Pendell tallied his third goal of the tournament, Sheldon and Croteau credited with the assist.

Murphy made 38 stops in net for Fulton.

The Fulton Midget hockey team will compete against the Louisville, Great Neck and Mohawk Valley18U teams in the New York State Midget Championships in Amherst March 14-16.

THE SPORTSMAN’S WORLD: Watching the Snow Belt

By Leon Archer

As I write this week’s column, I am warmed by the sunshine pouring through my westward facing window.

I was just outside pruning some bushes and cleaning up the yard, and I noted the grass needs mowing. The daffodils are in full bloom and the maple trees are budded with their bright red blossoms already starting to shrivel up after the bees have done their work.

The thermometer tells me it is 63 degrees and it is 4:30 in the afternoon. That’s the way it is in Sammamish, Washington.

I check the weather in Oswego County nearly every day, and even though there was another snow storm this week, there appear to be signs that winter is starting to lose its grip.

No one will be picking up night crawlers right away, but they might be starting to stir deep underground. This is the time of year that I would be running a trap line when I was back in high school, and I can remember the weather bouncing around a lot in March.

I would pop out of bed about 4:30 in the morning, slip on my clothes and head out for the line. Some mornings were decent, but often it would be cold, windy and snowing.

Later in the month, it might be raining, but no matter what the weather, traps had to be checked once every 24 hours.

It was pretty good exercise, but if I figured what I made on average for the time I put in, trapping was a losing proposition. I enjoyed trapping, and if I ignored the hours I put in (which I always did.) the money was nice to have, and I knew I had earned it.

A few of my friends trapped also, but I don’t think any of them worked harder at it than I did.

April was always the better month for muskrat trapping, especially for me since most of my trapping was on streams, large and small.

Ice and snow made trapping streams like Sandy Creek difficult and provided poor returns, but when things warmed up a bit the rats would really be moving and I caught quite a few. An added bonus was that I could run my traps on Sandy Creek a second time, after school, and do some trout fishing at the same time.

Of course, April meant I was able to pick up night crawlers at least by mid–month and do some bullhead fishing at night. My schedule got pretty hectic in April; I loved it though.

Sometime in the hustle-bustle each day, I had to skin my trapping catch, flesh them, and stretch them, and if I had caught any bullheads the night before, they needed to be dressed as well. I was tired when I went to bed.

Oh yes, I forgot to mention, my parents also insisted that I get my homework done for school, no excuses.

So I sit here in Sammamish, envying you for what’s coming up, but being glad that I’m here right now enjoying the early spring while Oswego County snow keeps flying.

However, as I look back on the many years I have spent in Oswego County, and the winters I plodded through, I don’t believe I would rather have grown up anywhere else in the world.

I’ll be back before too long now, and if a late spring snowstorm should greet me, I’ll grin and bear it. I sure am looking forward to the fishing.

Robert “Bob” Hughes, WWII veteran, longtime printer

3-15_OBIThughesRobert “Bob” Hughes, 89, of Fair Haven, passed away on March 8, 2014 with his family by his side in Syracuse, NY.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife and best friend of 65 years, Betsy Hughes; his children, Robin (John) Thomas of Seattle, WA, Debbie (Ralph) Stamp of Cleveland, NY,  Jody (Marty) Satalin of Syracuse, NY,  Scott (Maureen) Hughes of Clinton, NY; 10 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren.

Bob grew up on the South Side of Syracuse and led a colorful childhood, and often recounted stories of selling newspapers on the street corner he bought and setting up pins at the local bowling alley.

His family later moved to Fulton, NY, where he attended Fulton High School and was a multi-sport athlete until 1942 when he enlisted and served as a Navy Pharmacist’s Mate in the Asiatic Pacific.

Upon returning as a WWII veteran, he completed his high school degree and soon met his wife, Betsy Miller of Baldwinsville, NY.

Bob was a devoted husband and loving father while raising four children with Betsy in Lysander, NY and spending summers in their beloved Fair Haven.

Bob led a successful career in the printing industry, starting at Sealright Co. and ultimately retiring as vice president of sales from Sonoco Flexible Packaging (formerly Morrill Press) in 1996.

He and Betsy moved to Fair Haven year-round, enjoying its beauty and volunteering in various village activities, including being a founding member of the Save our Fourth Association (S.O.F.A.).

Well-known and loved by all for his charming wit and humorous jokes, Bob will be missed by family and countless friends.

A memorial service celebrating his life will be held at the convenience of the family at a future date. Arrangements are being handled by Traub Funeral Home.

Contributions may be made in Bob’s memory to S.O.F.A., P. O. Box 13, Fair Haven, NY 13064.

Please visit www.traub.com for On-Line Guest Book.

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