SUNY Oswego expands study abroad program

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego has signed on with the newly launched Generation Study Abroad program, agreeing to increase the college’s participation in study-abroad opportunities to 20 percent of undergraduates by 2019.

Citing the challenges of rapid globalization, the Institute of International Education announced the five-year Generation Study Abroad in early March.

Its ambitious goal: bringing leaders in education, business and government together to double study-abroad participation nationally, reaching 600,000 students by the end of the decade.

Oswego joined 150 colleges in 41 states as early partners in the effort, including large universities such as Cornell, Ohio State, Texas A&M and Purdue, as well as four other SUNY colleges and universities.

Joshua McKeown, Oswego’s director of international education and programs, said the help of new short-term options for study-travel, the Global Laboratory summer-research program and other initiatives have increased participation in the last five years to 15 percent of the college’s undergraduates from about 5 percent, and Oswego is poised to make the next move upward.

The college has sent students to 40 countries the past seven years, from Argentina to United Kingdom to Mexico to China.

“We recently made the top 10 list nationally (in Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report) for master’s level study abroad enrollments, regularly are at or near the top rank for SUNY comprehensive college study abroad enrollments, and were cited by the Middle States reaccreditation team for our international programs,” McKeown said.

The Institute of International Education found in its annual study conducted with the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that with 295,000 students in credit and non-credit programs abroad in 2011-12, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate.

Vegetables are stars during Ag Literacy Week

Kaylen Lamphere, a second-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.
Kaylen Lamphere, a second-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

March 17-21 was Agricultural Literacy Week throughout New York and second-graders learned a lot about something they usually dread — vegetables.

Second-graders at Maroun Elementary School learned about fruits, vegetables and farming during Agricultural Literacy Week.

Jan Smith, of Cornell Cooperative Extension, offered the students some food for thought as she read Tom Darbyshire’s “Who Grew My Soup?”

The story highlights a picky eater’s journey to meet every single farmer who grew the vegetables used in his mom’s soup.

Along the way, the boy learns how vegetables are grown and he is no longer hesitant to indulge in the homemade soup.

In addition to the story, students snacked on baby carrots and created their own soup using paper cutouts of vegetables and other farm-fresh ingredients.

“Even if you don’t like soup there are plenty of other ways to get your vegetables,” Smith said.

Teacher Patty Lazarz said Ag Literacy Week always provides students with a different educational experience.

“(Smith) has come to talk to us about maple syrup production, honey, chickens and gardening,” Lazarz said. “It usually has something to do with nature and the students learn a lot.”

All lessons, activities and extensions are aligned to state and Common Core Learning Standards.

Phoenix Community Band performs spring concert

A portion of the Phoenix Community Band is pictured above with Director David Frateschi. The group is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performed an array of music at the March 17 concert.
A portion of the Phoenix Community Band is pictured above with Director David Frateschi.
The group is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performed an array of music at the March 17 concert.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Spring hasn’t sprung, but music was certainly in full bloom on the evening of March 17 at John C. Birdlebough High School.

The school welcomed the Phoenix Community Band for its much anticipated spring concert performance.

Under the direction of Director David Frateschi, a talented blend of nearly 70 musicians performed nine songs and featured several guest conductors including Colleen Dailey, Robert Taylor and John Hylkema.

In recognition of the Irish holiday, the band also performed a special “Riverdance” piece with Neal Saarie serving as the captain.

The Phoenix Community Band is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performs several concerts at the high school throughout the year.

For more information about the band, visit the Phoenix Central School District  website at PhoenixCSD.org.

The band’s practice schedule can be found on the district’s calendar or more information can be found under the ‘Community’ link at the top of the page.

Dillon students learn about Mithila art

3-22_PHOdillon
Indian folk artist Rani Jha gives Nicholas Vaverchek some pointers as he creates his first-ever Mithila artwork.

Students became artists at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School recently when renowned Indian folk artist Rani Jha stopped by for a demonstration.

Jha, who was visiting America for the first time, discussed the history of Mithila painting. She told students that the artwork was once created by women on the walls of their houses.

Today it is an art form that has been reimagined as a way to raise awareness about contemporary social issues, she said.

For the sixth-graders in Beth Pritchard’s art class at EJD, the visiting artist provided much more than an educational discussion about Mithila painting, as students created their own Mithila work under Jha’s tutelage.

“Children learn fast, they’re like a blank sheet of paper,” Jha said, noting that the student artwork was excellent.

Jha’s visit was part of an Oswego County BOCES Arts in Education initiative, which is a service that coordinates a wide variety of artists, authors, and character education speakers who can introduce students to new cultures, creativity, and ideas to help them broaden their perspective on the world.

If it’s spring, then Rudy’s is open

Rudy’s Lakeside Drive-In opened for the season Wednesday March 19 with a full house of patrons. Cars were parked in both lots and across the front and sides of the building at lunchtime. The stand, famous for its seafood and hot sauce, has spring hours of 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The eatery uses 200 gallons of ketchup every week  and cooks 2,000 pounds of fish every week — a total of 60,000 pounds of fish a season. Rudy’s rice pudding, macaroni salad, cole slaw and tzatziki are all proprietary recipes prepared fresh daily. And local butcher, Boscos, has supplied beef to Rudy’s for more than 50 years and fresh produce comes daily from Ontario Orchards, which is right down the road. For more info on Rudy’s, go to 222.rudyshot.com
Rudy’s Lakeside Drive-In opened for the season Wednesday March 19 with a full house of patrons. Cars were parked in both lots and across the front and sides of the building at lunchtime. The stand, famous for its seafood and hot sauce, has spring hours of 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The eatery uses 200 gallons of ketchup every week and cooks 2,000 pounds of fish every week — a total of 60,000 pounds of fish a season. Rudy’s rice pudding, macaroni salad, cole slaw and tzatziki are all proprietary recipes prepared fresh daily. And local butcher, Boscos, has supplied beef to Rudy’s for more than 50 years and fresh produce comes daily from Ontario Orchards, which is right down the road.
For more info on Rudy’s, go to 222.rudyshot.com

Maroun students help homeless at Easter

Michael A. Maroun Elementary School art teacher Ashley Myers shows off the bunny basket third-grader John McDonald created for the Hikers for Homeless outreach project. The project gave students an opportunity to practice some of their drawing and design skills and the baskets will be filled with personal care items children and staff at the school are collecting. The baskets will be delivered to homeless people in the community Easter Sunday.
Michael A. Maroun Elementary School art teacher Ashley Myers shows off the bunny basket third-grader John McDonald created for the Hikers for Homeless outreach project. The project gave students an opportunity to practice some of their drawing and design skills and the baskets will be filled with personal care items children and staff at the school are collecting. The baskets will be delivered to homeless people in the community Easter Sunday.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The students and staff at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School in the Phoenix Central School District are coordinating a project to help the homeless population in their community.

The school has teamed with Hikers for the Homeless, a Phoenix-based non-profit organization, to help create more than 100 Easter baskets for people in the district’s community who do not have a permanent residence.

Students in third grade have been working with art teachers Kathy Lambert and Ashley Myers to create homemade baskets for the project.

The students put into practice some of the art and drawing techniques that they have been learning about in class to create baskets with unique patterns, designs, and festive bunny faces.

The paper baskets will be filled with personal care items that the school is in the process of collecting.

Items being collected by Maroun students and staff include: washcloths, travel-sized toiletries such as shampoo, conditioner, soap, lotion, powder, and deodorant, lip balm, toothpaste, toothbrushes, small first aid kits or first aid supplies, sewing kits, clean cotton or wool socks, plastic baggies (any brand and any size), low-value gift cards and coupons to fast-food restaurants, pens, small notebooks, playing cards, small games and individually wrapped Easter candies.

Those wishing to support the Maroun children in their community service project to help the homeless population in the community can drop off donations of any of the above items to the main office of the elementary school on or before April 11.

St. Paddy’s Day in Oswego

The freezing temperature of just 2 degrees didn’t stop this annual event in the Port City.  The Ancient Order of Hibernians Oswego hoisted two Irish flags in honor of St. Patrick’s Day in downtown Oswego at Civic Plaza.  From left, Gary Tolley, Ancient Order of Hibernians history officer, and Ancient Order of Hibernians President Timothy Kirwan and sons Tommy and Timmy hoist the Irish Flag in honor of St. Patrick’s Day 2014.  Photo courtesy of  Beth Clark Photography
The freezing temperature of just 2 degrees didn’t stop this annual event in the Port City.
The Ancient Order of Hibernians Oswego hoisted two Irish flags in honor of St. Patrick’s Day in downtown Oswego at Civic Plaza.
From left, Gary Tolley, Ancient Order of Hibernians history officer, and Ancient Order of Hibernians President Timothy Kirwan and sons Tommy and Timmy hoist the Irish Flag in honor of St. Patrick’s Day 2014.
Photo courtesy of
Beth Clark Photography

Health clinics for week of March 24

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County.

These services include preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the state Department of Health. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.

No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered during the week of March 24 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

  • Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.
  • Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, March 25, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.
  • Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.
  • Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.
  • HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St., Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

Rabies Clinic: Wednesday, March 26, 6 to 8 p.m., County Highway Garage, Schaad Drive, Scriba. $5 donation suggested.

State law requires all cats, dogs, and pet ferrets be vaccinated against rabies. The first rabies vaccine should be given at three months of age.

A second vaccination is required for cats and dogs within one year of the first, and every three years thereafter. Ferrets need to be vaccinated annually.

In order for pets to receive the 3-year booster shot, owners need to show that the pet was previously vaccinated and should bring their pet’s last rabies vaccination certificate to the clinic.

For more information about public health services, call the county Health Department, weekdays, phone 349-3547 or (800) -596-3200, ext. 3547.

For information on rabies clinics, call 349-3564.

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