Frederick Foster Dunsmoor, loved boating, golf

Frederick Foster Dunsmoor, 88, a resident of 3F, No. 15, Alley 38, Lane 24, Cheng-te Road, Section 3, Taipei, Taiwan, passed away Tuesday March 11, 2014.

He was birn in Osego Oct. 20, 1926, a son of the late Orlia and Bernice (Bullock) Dunsmoor.

He was a Navy and Air Force veteran. Fred loved boating and golfing and spending time with family and friends.

He was a member of Christ Church, Oswego, and Good Shepherds Church.

Surviving is his wife of 23 years, Ruth Dunsmoor; five children, Janet Morgan, sharon Dunsmoor, Rick Dunsmoor, David Dunsmoor and Cindy (Scott) Lambries; eight grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Sena Stone and Rose Pepper of Scriba.

He was a member of Master Masons, Shriners, past patron of Eastern Star, very active in all Masonic bodies — Scottish Rite, York Rite, the Royal Order of Scotland, Order of DeMolay and International Order of Rainbow for Girls.

He was predeceased by his brothers, Robert, Orlia, Jack, Edgar, Bryant; and a sister Norine Buske.

A memorial service will be held in Taipei. He will be bureid in Alaska.

Ezra Michael Natoli-Bourdon, infant

Ezra Michael Natoli-Bourdon, infant son of David Bourdon and Marianne Natoli, entered into God’s loving arms Monday March 17, 2014 at Highland Hospital, Rochester, due to Triploid Syndrome.

In addition to his parents, Ezra is survived by his brother, Ledger Natoli–Bourdon; his maternal grandparents, Bob and Peggy Natoli of Oswego; paternal grandparents, Jim and Nancy Bourdon of Oswego; paternal great-grandmother, Phyllis Maniccia of Oswego; uncles Bobby Natoli of Oswego, Matt (Mylien Le) Bourdon of Washington, DC; his aunt Emily Bourdon of Oswego; and cousin Hannah Bourdon of Oswego.

Funeral services and burial for Ezra will be private.

The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home 147 W. Fourth St., Oswego.

SKYWARN spotter training today in Fulton

The Buffalo office of the National Weather Service will be conducting a SKYWARN spotter training seminar in Fulton, at the Oswego County Offices, 200 N. Second St., at 7 p.m. Wednesday March 19 (today).

The training session is sponsored by the Oswego County Office of Emergency Services and will last about two hours. The session is open to the public and there is no cost for the training. 

The first Maple Weekend is this coming weekend

By Debra J. Groom

This coming Saturday and Sunday are the days to get out and visit area maple syrup producers.

It’s the first of two Maple Weekends, in which many producers open their operations so visitors can see how maple syrup is produced. Many also have pancake breakfasts so folks can taste that sweet nectar of the maple tree and have products people can buy.

So far this season, the weather hasn’t been ideal. There were a few days a couple of weeks ago that were warm enough for the sap to run. But then it got cold again.

“We’re scared,” said Kim Enders, who runs Red Schoolhouse Maple in Palermo. “We just boiled for the first time yesterday (Thursday March 13) but we didn’t make any syrup. We haven’t been able to get a string of good days in a row to get sap.”

Maple producers need temperatures during the day in the 40s and lows in the 20s to get a good sap flow. It has just been too darn cold for the sap to flow for a good number of consecutive days.

The temperatures for this week are OK for a four-day stretch in Onondaga County, but cooler in Oswego County, which means it is iffy how much sap will flow this week.

Some producers, like Timothy Whitens who runs Willow Creek Farm of just outside Fulton in the town of Granby, said he did get enough sap to make syrup in late February when there were four days of 40 degree temperatures.

“That first weekend, I made about 75 gallons, mostly medium amber,” Whitens said. “The sap ran again Monday and Tuesday (March 10 and 11) and I was able to make more.”

Feb. 19-23 all had temperatures of 40 or higher during the day and cold nights. But on Feb. 24, it got brutally cold again and shut off the taps.

While the temperatures this year have be too cold, in 2012, it was the opposite problem.

The weather during maple season began fine in January. But by early February, temperatures rose into the 50s. In mid-March, when sap should still be flowing and syrup would normally still be made, temperatures hit near 70.

Cornell University officials said the average temperature for the first 50 days of winter in Central New York is usually 24 degrees. In 2012, it was 32 degrees, the second warmest since 1950.

Anothr problem for maple producers in the Tug Hill area has been the amount of snow. Helen Thomas, executive director of the New York State Maple Producers Association, said with more than 300 inches of snow in some places, producers were having a difficult time getting to their lines and taps.

Enders said she hopes to have enough maple products to sell and offer for tasting during Maple Weekend. Red Schoolhouse Maple is open both days of the weekends, March 22 and 23 and March 29 and 30, and offers pancake breakfast, tours of the sugarbush and boiling area and tastings.

Whitens is open only Sunday, March 23 and March 30, and offers tours.

Maple Weekend hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Go to http://www.nysmaple.com/mapleweekend/ or www.mapleweekend.com for more information.

Maroun Elementary students show wonders of NY to kids in Texas

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

As students in the Phoenix Central School District are dealing with a relentless winter season, they learned how their peers in Texas were coping with below-average temperatures while interacting with one another during a recent Read Around the Planet videoconference.

Fourth-graders in Rachel Faulkner’s class at Michael A. Maroun Elementary and fourth-grade students at Ada Mae Faubion Elementary School in Cedar Park, Texas, learned about the differences and similarities of their home states.

Students in Texas began the videoconference by performing a skit detailing the history, geography, weather and different animals found in their state.

Phoenix students were amazed to learn schools in Texas even get snow days on occasion.

“We had two snow days this year, but mostly because of the cold,” a Texas student said. “But we did close when we got less than an inch of snow.”

While that statement was met with laughter by the Maroun fourth-graders, the videoconference provided much more than interesting facts and skits as the classes collaborated to write a poem.

Building on an experience the students had last year when children’s poet Kenn Nesbitt came to Phoenix, the Maroun students asked their Texas peers for a list of sports and a list of foods.

Using a rhyme scheme and alliteration, the classes created two poems titled “Playing with your Food.”

The videoconference was part of a distance learning offering provided by Oswego County BOCES.

The program strives to bridge the gap in educational opportunities and enhance learning experiences for students, teachers and community members by providing overall program coordination services, technical support, identification of district needs and connectivity access to school districts and educational institutions.

For more information, call 963-4298 or visit www.oswegoboces.org/web/iss/distancelearning.

Valley Viewpoints

Rule changes needed

The Fulton Softball Association needs some major rule changes.

Every team has to pay a $415 entry fee, $150 players fee and $375 umpire fees for a total of $940 for a 15-game season.

Now let’s look at what they get for their money, 1 and 1 count, mat ball, moved the bases back to 70 feet, 6 to 10 for arc (half the time you can’t throw more than 8 feet), limited home runs, 20 run rule after three innings or 10 run rule after five innings and 1 hour time limit.

These are the reasons why a lot of teams and players wanted me to run the league, because it is not fair to them. They pay all this money and don’t have a say about the rules, why not let them have a say on some of the rules.

They don’t even get to elect their own board members. I have seen a lot of games in the last few years that didn’t go more than 30 minutes, so now they paid $62.66 to pay that game when you divide $940 by 15.

Now you wonder why people quit playing the game.

The fees are too high and the rules only benefit the league.

I have played, coached and sponsored teams in this association for 33 years and seen this association go from being a great place to play to having no fun to play in anymore. Every team should be entitled to play at least 5 innings or an hour and 20 minutes if they ar not at the run rule.

If you want to speed the game up, get rid of the mat and call the game, there are a lot of batters who will take a talk because the mat is too short.

The game is so easy for umpires now and don’t take this wrong guys, because I have umpired a lot of games with your guys and respect every one of you for the job you do.

But the players deserve a lot more than what they are getting for their money. I will say this to you, Mr. Ostrander, that you wrote a letter of recommendation for hiring to the mayor when I worked seasonal for your department not too long ago, along with a lot of aldermen.

Now why all of a sudden the change in what you wrote? So if I can’t take you as a man of your word about  what you wrote in that letter, then what can people believe from you. I offered to run this league for nothing to relieve some of the stress on the businesses that sponsor teams and to bring back the sport. Instead, you hire someone to do it — let’s just keep spending unnessary money.

I am not all about money, I donate a lot of my time to this community. This was my way of giving back to this great sport that my dad and I have played for years.

I guess the only person who truly was a man of his word was Don Smith. He hired me as a scorekeeper, field manager and let me run the first ever fall league in Fulton. He saw the same thing in me that you saw when you wrote that letter.

So it’s not like I don’t have the experience to do the job. In order to be in control of the league, you have to come there and check it out. If someone calls you about the league, you call the president you hired.

Look where that has gotten this league, two years in a row of a couple of teams playing without paying any fees. as the head of the recreation department, you should come there to check up on things, just like you do with War Memorial and North Bay Campgrounds.

This way you know how things are being run and if there are any problems that can be handled differently. Instead let’s just keep chasing things to do out of Fulton, with all these high fees and poor management on your part.

Frank Allen

Former player, coach and sponsor

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Saving our part of the planet

I do not recall the date, but clearly remember the moment, when a couple of friends of mine approached me about investing in a company that was making “conversion” kits for the Volkswagen beetle.

These kits would turn your “slug-a-bug” game or in the case of a few in our group, their flower power car, into a dune buggy.

Now being the owner of a Dodge Challenger convertible and a cult follower of anything mopar, I was not interested. DUMB IDEA……needless to say; even though it was a fad of sorts these two went on to make a lot of money.

Investing in your future comes in many forms. Maybe you go after an education to secure a comfortable position that pays you well. You take on leadership and walk in shoes that put you in the crosshairs of the public eye.

You value family, friends, and the simple moments in life that the “busy” crowd chooses to never see. Whatever path(s) you choose to walk down, you have some control over your destiny.

All of those investments in life, good or bad, all of those choices you make daily, and all that shapes you will still put you into one group. We all share a responsibility to take care of our planet.

Now let me clarify, I am not a “tree hugger” don’t know a maple from an ash tree, still get confused over which plastic is recyclable and which type is not. I don’t care if you smoke, I don’t, yet get upset with the idiot who thinks they can flip their cigarette butt out of the car window and it bounces off my windshield.

I am fully aware of the roadside trash, the litter from fast food, the select few who feel that they do not have to make arrangements for trash removal and dump anywhere and those who feel it is easier to just throw things out of the car window.

I cannot change those who will not make an attempt to do what’s right. I cannot wrap myself around the concept of cleaning up the entire planet. Of what I am aware, is that we have some amazing areas right here in our own neighborhoods.

We have it all: forests, trails, lakes, streams, green space, recreational spots, sporting areas and so much more.

So as the legislative member who sits on the EMC Committee (Environmental Management Council) for the County of Oswego, I have finally decided that I am going to get off of my comfy chair sometime during Earth Week, and go out to join a group and pick up the trash and litter of those who do not care about our counties, towns, villages, and neighborhood assets.

My goal is to fill one trash bag. Depending on the spot, that could be a quick commitment, or maybe not.

Will it make a difference? In the big picture of things, nah, not so much. I will feel better for a couple of reasons: I will have engaged in something new for me and……well, if another 500 or 600 people in this county did the same, then maybe we kick the door open a little.

I will go with a group who can tell me, “No, wait, that is recyclable!”  Then maybe in the long run my goal will have to be modified to learn new information and have two bags — one for recyclables and one for trash.

If you would like to join in to help “clean up the earth” in Oswego County, EMC suggests you organize a group or join one to clean up a local park or green space.

You can call 343-4565 or visit www.co.oswego.ny.us/earthweek.html to sign up for an Earth Week cleanup project, or for more information.

James Karasek, 

Oswego County Legislator

Light in the Darkness

“And they were calling to one another:   “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.” (Isaiah 6:3). 

“Who among the gods is like you, O Lord?   Who is like you — majestic in holiness.”  (Exodus 15:11)

We are told that God’s Holiness is so central to His being that, “Holy is His name.” (Luke 1:49); and, because  we are told to, “be holy for He is holy” (several times in Leviticus and again in 1 Peter 1) it is important that we know what God means when He says that He is Holy.

Now this is not as easy a task as it may seem because God never tells us straight out what He means by His holiness. He can’t.

This is not because of any inability on His part but on ours. Words we would understand simply would do nothing to communicate what it means that God is Holy.

I like the way that A. W. Tozer put it.  “He is holiness Himself… beyond the ability of thought to grasp or word to express.  Language cannot express the holy, so God resorts to association and suggestion. He cannot say it outright because He would have to use words that we don’t know the meaning of, and we would then, of course, take the words He used and translate them downward into our terms.

“If He were to use a word describing His own holiness we could not understand that word as He uttered it. He would have to translate it down into our un-holiness. If He were to tell us how white He is we would translate it into terms of dingy grey.

“So, unable to communicate His holiness in words, God uses association and suggestion… he shows us His holiness by showing how that holiness affects the unholy.”

An illustration of what Tozer means by association and suggestion is seen when Moses comes into the presence of God at the burning bush (Exodus 3).

Moses is told to take off his sandals for he is standing on holy ground. Then, when Moses hears God say, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob” he hid his face, afraid to look at God.

Another illustration is given in the book of Isaiah (chapter 6). The Prophet was given a vision of the Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted and when he hears the creatures around that throne crying, “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory” Isaiah says that he cried out, “It’s all over! I am doomed, for I am a sinful man. I have filthy lips, and I live among a people with filthy lips.”

In R.C. Sproul’s, “The Holiness of God,”  the author reaffirms that encountering God’s holy presence is the one thing that reveals to us our own great depravity and need.

“When we understand the character of God, when we grasp something of His holiness, then we begin to understand the radical character of our sin and hopelessness.”

How true. Jonathan Edward’s well known sermon titled, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”  is often credited with beginning of a great spiritual awakening in America. It is unfortunate that both the title and the content lead readers to conclude that Edward’s emphasis was on the terrible flames of hell. On careful consideration, however, one realizes that the message reveals man’s utter sinfulness relative to a holy God.

Understood in this way, it becomes clear the theme of the message is not the fiery pit, but the Holy God who holds us from it, having prepared the way of rescue for those who believe. Edward’s sermon captured the essence of God’s Holiness in stark contrast to our un-holiness.

If we want to understand what it means that God is Holy, we must encounter that holiness first hand. When we do, that tremendous gulf that exists between His character and ours begins to sink in.

Only then do we begin to understand Proverbs  9:10 which tells us that,  “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.”

 

Pastor David M. Grey      

Mt. Pleasant 

United Methodist Church    

March 30 deadline to sign up for women’s bowling tourney

The Fulton Women’s Bowling Association 59th Annual Tournament will be April 5 and 6 at The Recreation Club in Fulton.

It will be team event only. Squad times are 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday April 5 and 4 p.m. Sunday April 6.

Those interested in entering the tournament or needing more information may call Paula Distin at 593-6121. Entries for the tournament close on Sunday March 30.

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