ARISE begins new program

ARISE has launched a new Access to Services Program for families who have a member with a developmental disability.

It can often be a confusing and difficult process for individuals as they search for the right programs that meet their needs. Through Access to Services, ARISE provides guidance and support to families as they go through the eligibility and application process established by the state Office for People with Disabilities.

Kristin Drumm, ARISE’s Access to Services Coordinator, is available to meet one-on-one with families to help identify programs that might be a good fit. In addition to explaining the different services that are available, Drumm also can help people gather required documentation and apply for programs.

While families are waiting for approvals, Drumm is able to bridge needs by connecting them to services that are immediately available in the community.

Drumm has extensive knowledge of the community programs available in Oswego County. In addition to serving as a Medicaid Service Coordinator for moe than eight years and her work as the HOME Program Coordinator, she also works as an ARISE advocate at the Oswego Department of Social Services.

As an advocate, Drumm helps individuals with disabilities access services that are not offered through the social services department. All of these experiences make her a very knowledgeable person and a great resource for anyone who has questions about available services.

To learn more about Access to Services, call Drumm, ARISE access to services coordinator, at 342-4088 ext. 230 or Lisa Seguin, manager, at 342-4088 ext. 208.

Daigle named UW Volunteer of the Year

Allain Daigle, (seated center) a member of the SUNY Oswego faculty and owner of Tiny Owl Media, received the United Way of Greater Oswego County’s Volunteer of Year Award at the agency’s Annual Meeting and Salute to Volunteers held March 12 at the American Foundry in Oswego. Pictured with Daigle are standing from left: United Way Campaign Cabinet members; Dick Delaney of Novelis; Rob Rolfe of Harmony Financial Services; Terry Syrell of CENG, Wally Dengos of National Grid; and Brian Finn of Entergy.  Seated from left are: Campaign Cabinet member Doug McRae of Bond, Schoeneck & King; and Kathy Fenlon, president of the United Way’s Board of Directors.
Allain Daigle, (seated center) a member of the SUNY Oswego faculty and owner of Tiny Owl Media, received the United Way of Greater Oswego County’s Volunteer of Year Award at the agency’s Annual Meeting and Salute to Volunteers held March 12 at the American Foundry in Oswego. Pictured with Daigle are standing from left: United Way Campaign Cabinet members; Dick Delaney of Novelis; Rob Rolfe of Harmony Financial Services; Terry Syrell of CENG, Wally Dengos of National Grid; and Brian Finn of Entergy. Seated from left are: Campaign Cabinet member Doug McRae of Bond, Schoeneck & King; and Kathy Fenlon, president of the United Way’s Board of Directors.

Allain Daigle, a member of the SUNY Oswego faculty and owner of Tiny Owl Media, received the United Way of Greater Oswego County’s Volunteer of Year Award at the agency’s Annual Meeting and Salute to Volunteers March 12 at the American Foundry in Oswego.

A strong proponent of Oswego County, Daigle was recognized for donating his time and talent to produce videos for United Way’s Annual Campaign Kick-Off and Annual Meeting.

“Allain has played an important role in helping tell the story of United Way and how the programs we fund positively effect those they serve,” said United Way Executive Director Melanie Trexler.

“His generosity and willingness to share his considerable talents truly captures the essence of our theme; It is our Community and It is Personal!” she said.

“It has been a real pleasure for me to produce these videos and tell these stories of Oswego County,” Daigle said.

“They are stories that I enjoy listening to and I appreciate the opportunity to help share these stories to help us grow and understand that we all are part of the same community,” he said.

Mexico man dies in crash

Harry L. Bartlett Jr., 31, of Mexico, died in a one-car crash Wednesday March 19 in the town of Richland.

Oswego County Sheriff’s deputies said Bartlett was driving west on State Route 13 about 11:25 Wednesday night and the car left the road, struck a fence and became airborne. It then overturned and hit a tree and then came to rest in a field.

Deputies said Bartlett was ejected from the car. They also said slippery roads and imprudent speed were factors in the crash.

Ringgold Fire Department out of Pulaski assisted the Sheriff’s Office at the scene.

SUNY Oswego expands study abroad program

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego has signed on with the newly launched Generation Study Abroad program, agreeing to increase the college’s participation in study-abroad opportunities to 20 percent of undergraduates by 2019.

Citing the challenges of rapid globalization, the Institute of International Education announced the five-year Generation Study Abroad in early March.

Its ambitious goal: bringing leaders in education, business and government together to double study-abroad participation nationally, reaching 600,000 students by the end of the decade.

Oswego joined 150 colleges in 41 states as early partners in the effort, including large universities such as Cornell, Ohio State, Texas A&M and Purdue, as well as four other SUNY colleges and universities.

Joshua McKeown, Oswego’s director of international education and programs, said the help of new short-term options for study-travel, the Global Laboratory summer-research program and other initiatives have increased participation in the last five years to 15 percent of the college’s undergraduates from about 5 percent, and Oswego is poised to make the next move upward.

The college has sent students to 40 countries the past seven years, from Argentina to United Kingdom to Mexico to China.

“We recently made the top 10 list nationally (in Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report) for master’s level study abroad enrollments, regularly are at or near the top rank for SUNY comprehensive college study abroad enrollments, and were cited by the Middle States reaccreditation team for our international programs,” McKeown said.

The Institute of International Education found in its annual study conducted with the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that with 295,000 students in credit and non-credit programs abroad in 2011-12, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate.

Vegetables are stars during Ag Literacy Week

Kaylen Lamphere, a second-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.
Kaylen Lamphere, a second-grader at Michael A. Maroun Elementary School, adds ingredients to the soup she and her classmates created during an activity held during Agricultural Literacy week.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

March 17-21 was Agricultural Literacy Week throughout New York and second-graders learned a lot about something they usually dread — vegetables.

Second-graders at Maroun Elementary School learned about fruits, vegetables and farming during Agricultural Literacy Week.

Jan Smith, of Cornell Cooperative Extension, offered the students some food for thought as she read Tom Darbyshire’s “Who Grew My Soup?”

The story highlights a picky eater’s journey to meet every single farmer who grew the vegetables used in his mom’s soup.

Along the way, the boy learns how vegetables are grown and he is no longer hesitant to indulge in the homemade soup.

In addition to the story, students snacked on baby carrots and created their own soup using paper cutouts of vegetables and other farm-fresh ingredients.

“Even if you don’t like soup there are plenty of other ways to get your vegetables,” Smith said.

Teacher Patty Lazarz said Ag Literacy Week always provides students with a different educational experience.

“(Smith) has come to talk to us about maple syrup production, honey, chickens and gardening,” Lazarz said. “It usually has something to do with nature and the students learn a lot.”

All lessons, activities and extensions are aligned to state and Common Core Learning Standards.

Phoenix Community Band performs spring concert

A portion of the Phoenix Community Band is pictured above with Director David Frateschi. The group is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performed an array of music at the March 17 concert.
A portion of the Phoenix Community Band is pictured above with Director David Frateschi.
The group is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performed an array of music at the March 17 concert.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Spring hasn’t sprung, but music was certainly in full bloom on the evening of March 17 at John C. Birdlebough High School.

The school welcomed the Phoenix Community Band for its much anticipated spring concert performance.

Under the direction of Director David Frateschi, a talented blend of nearly 70 musicians performed nine songs and featured several guest conductors including Colleen Dailey, Robert Taylor and John Hylkema.

In recognition of the Irish holiday, the band also performed a special “Riverdance” piece with Neal Saarie serving as the captain.

The Phoenix Community Band is in its 11th year in the Phoenix community and performs several concerts at the high school throughout the year.

For more information about the band, visit the Phoenix Central School District  website at PhoenixCSD.org.

The band’s practice schedule can be found on the district’s calendar or more information can be found under the ‘Community’ link at the top of the page.

Dillon students learn about Mithila art

3-22_PHOdillon
Indian folk artist Rani Jha gives Nicholas Vaverchek some pointers as he creates his first-ever Mithila artwork.

Students became artists at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School recently when renowned Indian folk artist Rani Jha stopped by for a demonstration.

Jha, who was visiting America for the first time, discussed the history of Mithila painting. She told students that the artwork was once created by women on the walls of their houses.

Today it is an art form that has been reimagined as a way to raise awareness about contemporary social issues, she said.

For the sixth-graders in Beth Pritchard’s art class at EJD, the visiting artist provided much more than an educational discussion about Mithila painting, as students created their own Mithila work under Jha’s tutelage.

“Children learn fast, they’re like a blank sheet of paper,” Jha said, noting that the student artwork was excellent.

Jha’s visit was part of an Oswego County BOCES Arts in Education initiative, which is a service that coordinates a wide variety of artists, authors, and character education speakers who can introduce students to new cultures, creativity, and ideas to help them broaden their perspective on the world.

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