Want to run for Phoenix school board? Get those petitions out now

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The Phoenix Central School District is accepting petitions for the board of education.

There are three seats open for election during the vote on May 20. The seats hold three-year terms and there is no salary.

The incumbents are Paul Gilchriest, Debbie St. Phillips and Keith Watkins.

Petitions to nominate candidates for the school board election can be obtained from the District Clerk’s office, located at the 116 Volney St., Phoenix.

Petitions must be signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the Phoenix Central School District and must state the name and address of the candidate. Residential address of each signer must also be provided.

The petitions must be filed with the District Clerk’s office no later than 5 p.m. Monday, April 21. The budget vote and elections will take place May 20.

Jerry’s Journal

I really can’t say what brought it on, this reminiscing/thanking/philosophizing I’m about to share with  you.

Maybe it’s because spring has sprung (so we hope) and with it warm weather and April showers to make things grow again, and Easter and hope for a new day.

I like to believe there’s always something to look forward to!

It began earlier this week after a trip to the local supermarket and I make this astute observations: It costs a lot of money to eat healthy. What’s that you say? One red pepper and one sweet potato came to almost $3. No way!

Yes, way. And I think it’s worth it, too, because we can afford it. But what about people who can’t afford fruits and vegetables and eat mostly junk food, I rambled on to my loving husband, Ed, on our way home from our shopping trip.

Junk food is a lot cheaper; no wonder there’s so much obesity.

Well, okay, dear Readers, who am I to talk — I’m no size 5 myself, not even close — I love my sweets! I do try, however, to put a couple of kinds of vegetables on the dinner table and try to eat as healthy as I can.

One problem with this perfect scenario, though, is that I don’t like to cook! Nope, never did. I had to anyway, when the kids were growing up.

Cooking for two adults and four children day in and day out was just part of my good wife/mother routine and I thought nothing of it. You did what you had to do.

I wasn’t too fond of grocery shopping, either. I was never the dedicated coupon clipper and sale shopper. If something was on sale and I could use it I would buy it. Otherwise, I bought what I needed to get through the week.

We went from paycheck to paycheck, back then, when Mike’s pay came in the mail on Thursday. It was my day off, leave the little darlings at home with a baby sitter day, my day to go grocery shopping, pay the bills and perhaps look around in the stores downtown.

My last stop of the afternoon was to Angelo’s Big M on West First Street to buy our groceries, several bags full, which usually came to about $20. Yes, you remember it well, 20 bucks used to go a long way!

Besides, I sure could stretch out the staples: hamburger, chicken, pot roast, potatoes, carrots, spaghetti, a couple cans of tomatoes (to make the sauce), a few cans of veggies and chicken noodle and  tomato soup, a package of sliced cheese (tomato soup and grilled cheese, yum) a box of oatmeal and a box of cereal (my kids loved their cereal), a couple of loaves of white bread and a big jar of peanut butter and jar of jelly.

An egg lady and a milkman delivered their wares right to our door, and in the summer we had more fresh fruits and vegetables, otherwise they came from the can. My kids just loved canned peaches!

As you can see from my grocery list it wasn’t exactly “healthy eating” and I was no gourmet cook (my kids didn’t know the difference), our diet didn’t vary too much, but our bellies were full.

One week I spent $42 at the grocery store! Mike had overtime pay and we were low on several essentials (you just can’t do without sugar and flour and dish detergent and toilet paper) so I stocked up — two shopping carts full, no less — and they contained no junk food, well, maybe a half gallon of ice cream and one big bottle of soda pop.

Those were special treats for just once in a while. Most of the time, though, my kids were content with popcorn and orange juice for a treat Sunday night while they were watching the Wonderful World of Disney just before they went to bed.

Oh, the good old days! It was a whole different world back then.  It’s the world I sometimes long for, talk about with family and friends, but realize I can’t bring it back, so I try to “live for today,” as they say. It ain’t so bad, you know… .

We still can smile and be glad we have lived here in Fulton, New York — it’s a beautiful part of our country — and remember how good it was growing up in “the Little City of Power and Progress.”

To be sure, we are sad, it’s not as pretty and neat and tidy as it used to be, but that doesn’t mean we can’t continue to love it to death.

We still can be thankful for the good living and jobs it gave us at Nestle’s, Sealright, Dilts, Armstrong, Niagara Mohawk, the telephone company, the canning factory, the box company, just to name a few, and for the good schools we went to — Oak Street, Erie Street, Phillips Street, State Street, Fairgrieve and Good Old Fulton High.

We can thank God for the friends we made along the way and for a chance to grow old with each other and see each other at Mimi’s, the Blue Moon, the Lock, and other great places to meet and eat here in our hometown. It’s so good we still can laugh and yes, still cry together.

We can be thankful for the amazing Oswego River and the awesome Lake Ontario, and Rudy’s, and for Syracuse, our nearby metropolis, and for its university — go SU (I know their basketball season is over, but I love them anyway. Thanks for a great season!).

I am also grateful I can afford healthy food. I thank God every day for my life I had with Mike Hogan, and now with Ed Kasperek. I am thankful for all our children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren…And, I am thankful for all of you, too.

Now here’s my caveat: Readers beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share. Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up.

I hope you have fun reading my stuff. Your comments, additions and corrections are always welcome. You may contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan808@aol.com.

Please put Jerry’s Journal in the subject line. Thanks!

Valley Viewpoints

Thanks event sponsors

The Run for Dennis event would not have been possible without the generous and heartfelt support we received from so many individuals and sponsoring organizations.

We would like to thank all who supported us both financially and with donated services:

Auyer Race Timing, Associated Dental Arts of Oswego, Azteca, Burke’s Home Center, C’s Farms, Cestaro Chiropractic, Chirello Advertising, Eagle Beverage, Entergy, Fitzgibbons Agency, Fleet Feet of Syracuse, Gibby’s Irish Pub, GU energy gel, Hibernians of Oswego, Integrative Healing Spa, Kinney Drug, Mitchell’s Speedway Press, National Honor Society Chapter of Oswego High School, Ontario Orchards, Oswego County Federal Credit Union, Price chopper, Riverview Wellness, Road ID, Sugar-Scanlon Funeral Home, The Press Box, The sunset Group-Oswego Triathlon, Trinity Catholic School, I Heart Oswego, Wiltsie Construction, Oswego Lions club, Top Stitch, DJ Plus, RJ Caruso, The Beacon Hotel, Oswego Bagelry and Sandwich shop, Bosco and Geers, Harbor Eye Associates, Murdock’s sports, Port City Chiropractic, Warner Physical Therapy, Wegman’s, WSYR NewsChannel 9’s Bridge Street, Time Warner Cable News, Jim and Phyllis Allen, Chip and Karen Kio, Bob and Kristen Lenz, and James and Darlene Tynan.”

Jessica Newson

Oswego

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Child Abuse Awareness Month

Each April, we celebrate Child Abuse Prevention Month.

This year’s theme is “Pinwheels for Prevention” and will be celebrated locally through the Department of Social Services and the Child Advocacy Center.

Child Abuse Prevention Month is a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of child abuse and neglect in our communities and is a call to action from the Prevent Child Abuse America organization.

This organization was founded in Chicago in 1972 and now has chapters in all 50 states and includes 581 Healthy Families America home visitation centers in 41 states, Puerto Rico and Canada.

Prevent Child Abuse America is focused on advocating for the creation of a national policy framework and strategy for the safety of children, while helping families to prevent incidents of abuse and neglect.

“Why Pinwheels for Prevention? Prevent Child Abuse America wants to transform awareness into action this year using the Pinwheel as a national symbol.

The pinwheel reminds us of childlike notions and stands for the chance at a healthy, happy, and full life that children deserve.”

Please review other important information on the organization’s website at:  (www.preventchildabuse.org)

Friday, April 4, 2014 was “Wear Blue Day” in recognition of Child Abuse Prevention Month.

This year in Oswego County, we celebrate the resilience of children and families determined to heal from these traumatic experiences, and honor the committed workers that support families and children in the community.

Far too many to name individually, they frequently come from the following areas:  schools, medical/mental health providers, caseworkers and managers, therapists, law enforcement, legal professions, Family Court and the District Attorney’s Office.

Providers committed to the safety of children in Oswego County encourage citizens to be involved in the lives of children in your neighborhood. Know children’s names and where they live, guide them away from danger whenever possible; whether it is a car in the street or a stranger approaching.

Be concerned and question children without appropriate supervision, without a coat in the winter, a child that appears to be hungry, or a child that is not attending school. The safety of children in our community relies on the commitment and willingness to act of community members.

Child Protective Services can intervene only once a report has been made to the State Central Registry.  A “finding” or positive conclusion of abuse or neglect can only be obtained if credible evidence is discovered to support the allegation.

When you see a child at risk, please do the following:

If you witness a crime being committed against a child:  Call 911

If you suspect abuse or neglect:  Call the NYS Child Abuse Hotline at (800) 342-3720. Provide as much information as possible: Name, address, parent’s name, if known. Detail your concerns. Be specific.  Bruises, malnourished, alone — no supervision, child has contact with inappropriate adults.

Date, times, or frequency of your observations. Calls can be made to the Hotline anonymously.

Protection of children in our community is everyone’s responsibility. The tried and true “it takes a village to raise a child” is a partnership we continue to build in Oswego County.

Be part of this effort through your commitment to the life a child. They indeed hold the future of our community in their hands.

Gregg Heffner, LCSW-R

Commissioner

Oswego County Department of Social Services

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Read Rita

On behalf of the residents of our fair Village of Hannibal, I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank our correspondent to The Valley News.

Rita Hooper has done a great job over MANY years – actually she wrote the column for many years before she and her late husband, the Rev. “Bob” Hooper moved to Pennsylvania to serve a church until his retirement.

They always considered Hannibal to be their home having served the Community Church for 20 years and both sons grew up and graduated from Hannibal Central School.

While Bob and Rita were in Pennsylvania, Bea Scott took over the editorial job for the Hannibal news until the Hoopers returned to Hannibal for their retirement, living several years at Cain’s Corners, a couple miles from the village.

After Bob’s passing, Rita sold her home in the town and moved to an apartment in Fulton. However she let us know she still considers Hannibal “her home” and she still writes the weeky column for The Valley News.

She also returns to the community for most events (even card-playing) and likes to keep up to date and take part in Hannibal activities. We of Hannibal are blessed to have such a go-getter as Rita still representing us.

Hers is no easy task as she prefaces the local activities with a little editorial, usually educating all readers on many topics. She does much research to write these articles.

Many people outside Hannibal mention the fact they saw something in “Rita’s column,” as we call it.

Today she is very active in the First United Church of Fulton. (Once retired from a church the pastor and family are encouraged – sometimes mandated – to not attend their former church.)

But, should you want something about Hannibal to appear in The Valley News it goes without saying be sure to put it in “Rita’s column.” Also, I’ve heard many readers say they can’t wait for Saturday’s paper to see what Rita wrote.

So thanks again to our Hannibal correspondent for a job well done. Keep up the good work, Rita and God Bless.

Louise Kellogg

Village of Hannibal

 

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Born in a Grocery Store?

When I was born, my parents lived in the house attached to the family’s Red & White Grocery Store in Syracuse’s Valley section, which is why I suppose, that during my early years I may have thought that I was born in a grocery store.

I lived there with my parents until I was almost 2.

Valley Drive is a long residential street, which was intersected one block from our store and the house where we lived, by the busy Seneca Turnpike corner.

I remember, while I was growing up, staying overnight with my grandparents at that house and being fascinated by the bright neon lights of “Club Candee,” the busy nightclub which was located a block from the family store.

When I was a little older, I earned my allowance by helping Grandpa keep the empty cardboard cartons in an orderly fashion, and by delivering small orders and advertising flyers to the neighbors.

Through the years, I got to know many of the store’s regular customers. My grandmother always insisted that even though I considered many of those customers my friends, I should always address them by Mr., Mrs. or Miss.

One of the exceptions was Fanny Chapman, who was a daily visitor to the store, and also worked there part-time through the years. I guess I thought it was OK to call her by her first name, because it made me giggle every time she walked into the store.

In a column I wrote several years ago, I was remembering those grocery store years:

“One of the stories I heard told over and over by my grandmother all the time I was growing up and much longer was that I learned to walk by picking up two glass milk bottles from the back hall of our house and carrying them into the store.

“My grandmother was also fond of sharing pictures of me when I was about six or seven wearing one of my father’s store aprons which hung down to the floor.

“One of my favorite toys from the store was a long pole with a pair of ‘grabbers’ on the end, which was used to pull items from the store’s high shelves.  Using those grabbers to knock things off the shelves and all over the store was probably how I got revenge for having to parade around in that silly looking apron.”

“Do You Have Prince Albert in a Can?

From Hodgepodge, Dec. 24, 2005:

“For several years during the time my family owned a grocery store in the Valley section of Syracuse, I was able to leave a special gift for Santa Claus each Christmas Eve.

“Every year my father brought home a tin of Prince Albert Tobacco from the store, and my brother, sister and I left the special gift for Santa along with a plate of cookies, under the Christmas tree.”

(I can still picture that special Christmas time can with Santa enjoying a pipe full of his favorite tobacco.)

“Every Christmas morning there was a plate of cookie crumbs, a note from Santa, and Prince Albert was nowhere in sight.”

Do you have Prince Albert in a can?  Well, let him out! My father said he heard that comment many times during his years at the store.

Thinking a lot about the store this week, I have recalled that the store had a “gum ball” machine. I remember it sitting on the counter at the front of the store where customers “checked out.” As you might imagine, the gum balls were small balls of gum with a thin candy coating.

I often went with my father to the store when he visited on Sunday mornings. While he went about his business, I was putting pennies in the gum ball machine.

There were one or two special gum balls in the machine; I don’t know if they were even gum. They were very colorful, which made it easy to distinguish them from the other gum balls.

Looking for a “Winner”

Those gum balls were “special” – they were known as “winners” because if one of them came out of the machine when your penny was inserted that penny would “win” five more pennies – which of course would immediately be put back into the machine.

It wasn’t long before I learned to try to outsmart that gum ball machine. I knew that the “winner” wouldn’t come out if I could still see it in the machine’s glass globe.  So I shook and I jiggled until the coveted “winner” was out of sight, hopefully ready to come out when my penny went into the slot.

I soon discovered that all the shaking and jiggling was an exercise of futility.  All I had to do was to ask my father for more pennies. But I am sure that it would have added a little more excitement to my young life if a “winner” had come out of the gum ball machine.

Those days spent long ago at the family store with my father and grandparents are among the fondest of many memories.

A Couple More Things

No matter how much you push the envelope it will still be stationery.

I got a job at a bakery because I kneaded dough.

I read a book about anti-gravity. I just can’t put it down.

And, here’s one from Henny Youngman:

“A drunk goes up to a parking meter, puts in a dime. The dial goes to 60. The drunk says, “Huh I lost a hundred pounds.”

                                        . . . Roy Hodge

Longtime Fulton athletic official named to Hall of Fame

Don Distin, of Fulton, has been named to the Class of 2014 for the New York State Athletic Administrators Hall of Fame.

He and others were installed into the Hall of Fame March 14 at the Saratoga Hilton in Saratoga Springs. This was part of the New York State Athletic Administrators annual conference and Dave Martens Awards Luncheon.

Distin grew up and spent most of his life in Fulton. He was a staff sergeant in the US Army and member of the Signal Corps.

He was sent to Germany, and when the Army found out he could play football, he became captain of the 6th Armored Cavalry in 1952. The team won the European championship. He was also the trainer for the 6th Armored Cavalry boxing team.

Distin received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as permanent certification as director of health and physical education, from Ithaca College. He earned his administrative and supervision certificate from SUNY Oswego.

Distin was hired as a social studies teacher and head football coach at G. Ray Bodley High School in Fulton.

He is credited with starting the wrestling team in Fulton in 1959. In 1962, he became director of athletics and taught physical education. Three years later he was promoted to administrator of health, physical education and recreation for the Fulton City School District.

Distin served as president of Section 3 from 1978-80. He also was president of the New York State Council of Administrators of HPER, New York Stae Dental Health Teachers Association, Central New York Cities League and Central Zone President for Council of Administrators of HPER.

Distin was on the original organizing committee of the New York State Athletic Administrators Association in 1981 and attended the first organizational meeting in Binghamton. He was selected and served as the first past president for the New York State Athletic Administrators Association from 1981-83.

In addition to serving on many section, state and national committees, Distin also served as speaker at many of those state and national conference workshops.

He has had numerous honors bestowed upon him by his community, school, Section 3, state and national organizations.  Upon retirement, the new Fulton Athletic Complex was dedicated in his honor.

Distin has also served his church and acted as chairman of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes for the Syracuse area for five years.

Distin and his wife, Carolyn, were married for more than 50 years and had four children, sons Sherman and Mark and daughters Susan and Mary Beth.

After his retirement, they retired to Florida. Carolyn passed away in 2006, and Distin has been remarried to Judy, and they live in Avon Park, Florida.

In addition to Distin, those installed were in the hall of fame were:

** Robert Douglas (deceased), a member of the original organizing committee, second state president, first finance chair

** Joseph Farrell (deceased), Binghamton, original organizing committee and host of first official meeting.

** Dr. John Foley (deceased), national publications committee, state Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame,

** Alan Mallanda, Lake Luzerne, original organizing committee, fifth state president, second executive director, 14th national president, NIAA merit and hall of fame

** David Martens, Fairport, (deceased), original organizing committee, first state president, fifth national president NIAAA hall of fame and award of merit

** Mason Morenus, Homer, original organizing committee, conference presenter and organizer, Otis Sennett Award, NIAAA state delegate

** Bernie O’Brien, Section 8 executive director, original organizing committee, first treasurer, NIAAA award of merit, New York State Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame.

** Roy O’Neill, Mamaroneck (deceased), fourth state president, first executive director, NIAAA award of merit.

** Otis Sennett, Baldwinsville, original organizing committee, organized first conference, New York State Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame, NIAAA award of merit, NIAAA Hall of Fame.

In and Around Hannibal, by Rita Hooper

Ukraine has been in the news lately as Russia has seen fit to take over Crimera, a part of Ukraine.

But I would like to share with you a little about Ukraine that some of my readers may not know.

During Lent, the women and girls (primarily) of Ukraine have decorated special eggs called pysanky eggs. It is believed  this tradition may go as far back as 4,000 BC.

They use a special process that uses beeswax and dyes on raw eggs. You must be careful not to break the eggs or you will have a big mess!

Over a period of years, the contents of the eggs dry up and the eggs become very light and they will last for years. They are tougher than they look!

The tool they use to put the wax on the egg and make the designs with is called a kistka. Where the wax is placed will remain white or the previous dye color. The wax is removed from the egg by melting it off, usually in a candle flame.

Eggs are used because they represent new life or rebirth. They are made during Lent so they will be ready for Easter where their use reminds us of the resurrection of Jesus.

The egg also is a symbol of the sun.  Many of the designs on the eggs have special meanings as well. For example, flowers represent love, animals, wealth and prosperity, dots are stars and butterflies nature, and wheat, a bountiful harvest.  Any design that encircles the egg represents eternal life.

Every color chosen has special meaning too: Yellow – Happiness, Blue – Health, Orange – Endurance, Black – Protection from Evil

The women will often decorate these eggs in private so their ideas are not copied. Each egg is an original.

Some Ukrainians believe the eggs will ward off evil. I bet they are making lots of eggs this year and would appreciate any you made.

I remember years ago, the Hannibal Library did a couple of workshops on pysanky eggs. Some of you may remember Librarian Karen Eckersley became quite good at doing these eggs and I was the lucky recipient of one or two of them.

The gift of a pysanky egg is very special and represents love, peace and friendship.  As for me and my heavy handedness, I’ll stick with hard cooked eggs and simple dyes. A simple, kid friendly method is to draw pictures on a boiled egg with a crayon and dip it in the dye. Where the picture is will remain white.

My husband used to like to write scripture passages on the eggs…ah you’re never too old to color eggs!

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The Hannibal Sports Boosters is conducting a lottery ticket raffle to raise funds to support the Hannibal Athletics program.

They anticipate selling 1,000 tickets.  Each ticket sold will then be eligible to win $50 each day for the month of May using the New York state daily lottery number that is drawn each evening.

An individual who purchases a $5 ticket will have 31 chances of winning during the month of May.

There will be four bonus days — Wednesdays during May. The winning ticket on those days will receive an additional bonus of $50 for a total of $100.

Only those over 18 are permitted to sell the tickets. Tickets will be sold from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the IGA/Village Market April 5 (today) and April 19.

If you have questions or would like to purchase tickets, call Mark Lafurney @ 374-8806 or email: mark.lafurney@eaglebev.com

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will be holding their Spring Book and Bake Sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 6 at the Hannibal Senior Center Rooms, next to the Library.  There will also be a wide variety of baked goods  for sale.  For more information please call Faith Chaffee, 564-5192.

The Enoch Thomas Methodist Cluster will hold their last Lenten Service at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 6 at Bowen’s Corner Church. Refreshments will follow.

The Senior Meals Program meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday for lunch at the Senior Center promptly at noon. The center, located in the library across from  the Hannibal Fire Hall on Oswego Street,  opens at 10.

This week’s menu features:

Monday, April 7 — Homemade soup and sandwich (call for details), crackers, juice, fruit cocktail

Wednesday — Goulash, vegetable, juice, pineapple tidbits

Friday — Chicken cordon bleu, roasted potatoes, vegetable blend, yogurt

Activities: Monday — games and Wii bowling; Wednesday — games, bingo after lunch; Friday — games, craft (beaded crosses)

Bone Builders meet at the American Legion Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:45AM.  If you have osteoporosis, there is help for you and your bones – stop in and check it out, or give Louise Kellogg a call.

The Senior Council would like to remind you that their rooms are available for groups and family rental when not being otherwise used.  Please give Rosemary a call for information and booking (564-5471.)

The Hannibal Nursery School announces an open house will be held, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday April 9 at the school in the upstairs of the Hannibal Library. Enrollment is open for the fall 2014-2015 school season. School season runs September-May. Classes are held 9 to 11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Fridays. All 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds welcome. Call Christy at 727-1653 with any questions.

The Hannibal Library has a Garden Time raffle basket full of containers, gift certificate from Travis Floral, Book on container gardening, gloves, tools and more. The drawing will be on April 15th.

A Maundy Thursday service will be at Hannibal United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 17.

Granby Center United Methodist Church will have a Good Friday service at 5:30 p.m.

Please churches in the Hannibal Area, let me know your Holy Week schedule.

On June 2, they will be honoring Fred Kent for his contributions to the Hannibal community.  Save the date now!

Rita Hooper  706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

News in Brief

The annual Spring Live and Silent Auction at Oswego Community Christian School is today (April 5) at the Elks Lodge in Oswego.

The silent auction is from 1 to 2:30 p.m. and the live auction is 2:30 to 4 p.m. There also are some special drawings.

Visit the school’s website at 22.myoccs.org for more information.

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The City of Fulton Department of Parks and Recreation is once again sponsoring Line Dance Instruction featuring popular dance instructor, Phil Eno.

Instruction will begin in the City of Fulton Municipal Building Community Room at 141 S. First St., Fulton, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8.

Registration will take place at the first class. There are fees for the class.

For more information, call 592-2474.

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A program titled “Breakfast and Brainfood: When You Wish Upon A Star” is scheduled for two days in April at the SUNY Phoenix Center.

Part I will be from 8 to 9:30 a.m. April 10 and Part II will be 8 to 9:30 a.m. April 24. The session is free and being put on by the Greater Oswego-Fulton chamber of Commerce.

During the sessions, participants will learn how to turn their business strategy into reality by evaluating seven key organizational elements, and harnessing their momentum to propel your organization forward.

Kelly Sullivan of CSTI-Core Skills, True Impact will share the principle drivers of organizational change along with practical tips that will help you to plan and execute your strategy.

Rich Burritt, of Burritt Motors, will share his insight and experience using those principles to dramatically improve the customer experience at his organization.

This sessions are free and open to the public. Please register either online at http://oswegofultonchamber.com/cwt/External/WCPages/WCEvents/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=962, by phone at 343-7681 or by email at membership@oswegofultonchamber.com

The Mexico Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday April 10 at the Wilcox building, Presbyterian Church, Church Street.

This first meeting of the year will include a brief business meeting followed by a program “The History of Vacuum Cleaners.”

May’s program will be the War of 1812, 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Big Sandy.  On June 12, the scheduled program is Historic Homes of Mexico presented by Historian Bonnie Shumway and Diane Miller.

The public is invited to all programs.

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The Hannibal Ecumenical Bake Sale is set for 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 12 at the Hannibal Village Market, IGA.

The money raised from the two bake sales each year are used to support The Hannibal Resource Center Thanksgiving Dinner Giveaway and the Hannibal Central School Christmas Bureau Giveaway.

The Ecumenical Key Council of the Churches Of Hannibal is made up of members of each of the village churches. The Council meets at 2:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at Our Lady of the Rosary Church.

Everyone is welcome.

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The Greater Fulton community is invited to meet city and county elected leaders at 5 p.m. April 12 at the First United Church of Fulton, 33 S. Third St., Fulton.

There will be free pizza and soda. Elected leaders will include Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward, Fifth Ward Councilor Jay Foster, Sixth Ward Councilor Lawrence Macner, and County Legislators Frank Castiglia Jr. and James Karasek.

The purpose of the event is to build better communication and understanding between citizens and their civic leaders, and to encourage neighborhood based cooperation and coordination. The conversations with the elected officials will be from 6 to 7 p.m.

This event is sponsored by the Open Doors Neighborhood Center, a community outreach ministry of the First United Church of Fulton.

For more information about the First United Church and our Open Doors Neighborhood Center, call the Rev. David Nethercott at First United Church at 592-2707 or email him at prairieborn@aol.com.

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There will be a chicken barbecue from noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday April 13 at the Granby Center Firehouse.

Both full dinners and chicken halves will be sold.

The next barbecue will be May 25.

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The Oswego Town Historical Society will host its April meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday April 16 at the Oswego Town Hall 2320 County Route 7.

The guest speaker will be Jim Farfaglia, who will present his new book “Of the Earth,” which is about muck farming in Oswego County and includes interviews with muck farmers of the area.

Muck farming was and is an important part of Oswego Town’s economy.  You will find the evening with Farfaglia informing and entertaining as he relates his experiences in gathering the information for his book.

The public is cordially invited.

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The First United Methodist Church in Fulton is presenting “Tenebrae, A Rock & Roll Easter Cantata” at 7:30 p.m. April 18 at the church at 1406 State Route 176 (across from the junior high).

Experience Good Friday in a different way. Join us for “Tenebrae, a Rock and Roll Easter Cantata,” performed by Sent Forth Ministries. Hear and experience the last hours of Jesus life in reflection and song.

All are welcome. A free will offering will be taken.

For further information, visit www.fultonfumc.org or phone the office at 592-7347.

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The Oswego Community Ecumenical Good Friday Cross Walk, again indoors, is being held at noon April 18 in the sanctuary at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 103 W. Cayuga St.

The service of prayer, reflection, silence, and song, will follow the traditional “Stations of the Cross,” the way of Jesus from his condemnation, through his crucifixion and burial on Good Friday.

The sanctuary is handicapped accessible and there is seating at each of the stations.  The service should be done by 1:15.

For more information, contact Roger Martin at Faith United Church, 343-3480, or Richard Klafehn, Grace Lutheran and Church of the Resurrection, 216-4416.

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Port City Faith will introduce a series titled “He Still Moves Stones” during its two Easter Services at 9 and 10:45 a.m. April 30.

The series will address many of the concerns and obstacles people in our community face: depression, anxiety, emotional disorders, relational struggles and many more applicable issues.

“There is a solution to these heartbreaking life struggles, I challenge you to join us for these services and find out what the answer is!” said Pastor Sebastian Foti.

This is the first time the church will present two Sunday services in order to accommodate the growth of the congregation as well as the holiday surplus in attendance.

Port City Faith has an upbeat style of service with contemporary worship and relevant preaching. Its intricate children’s church program is offered to grades pre-kindergarten through six, and nursery is also offered for those less than four years of age.

For additional information, visit www.portcityfaith.com or the church’s Facebook page.

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Oswego County’s Earth Week is April 25 through May 4.

Groups, nonprofits and organizations will get together at times during that week to help clean up areas of their communities.

For more information on the cleanup, go to www.oswewgocounty.com/earthweek.html or call 343-4565.

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Local author Jim Farfaglia, will give a discussion and photo slideshow about muck farming and its impact on the town of Volney and Oswego County at 2 p.m. April 27 at the Volney town hall.

Farfaglia will talk about his recently-published book on muck farming, including interviews and stories of local farmers, their families, neighbors, and workers.

Farfaglia’s book and a book title “Muck Farming in Volney” will be available.

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May Day (May 1st) is celebrated in many places around the world.

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County will celebrate May Day by teaching a quilting series, the May Basket Quilted Wallhanging.

This two-part workshop will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, May 1 and May 8. Participants will learn to sew their own May basket quilt blocks to assemble into a quilted wallhanging.

The cost is $16, which includes the instruction and pattern. This quilting program will be held at the Oswego County Cooperative Extension office in Mexico.

Call Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County at 963-7286 ext. 302 to register and also to receive a materials list. Registration deadline is Thursday April 24.

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The monthly meeting of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 56 in Fulton will be at 7 p.m. May 7 at the VFW, 216-218 Cayuga St., Fulton.

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Astrophysics symposium April 25-26 at SUNY Oswego

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego will host the “Astrophysics for the New Century” symposium April 25-26, featuring a keynote speech on computational astrophysics by a University of Rochester faculty member.

Dr. Adam Frank, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, will deliver a free, public talk at 7:15 p.m. Friday, April 25, in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

With interests at the intersection of astrophysical fluid dynamics, stellar evolution and supercomputer simulations, Frank will speak about his research in hypersonic outflows in stellar environments, which produce “some of the most beautiful structures in the night sky,” he said.

“Much of my work to date has focused on the origin and evolution of these outflows,” Frank said. “Currently my group is working to understand the formation of ‘bipolar’ (double-lobed) outflows at the extremes of stellar evolution.”

In addition to his research and teaching, Frank is a freelance science journalist with articles in Discover and Astronomy magazines.

Parking for Frank’s talk is available in the employee and commuter lots adjacent to and across Washington Boulevard from Sheldon Hall.

The symposium is a joint meeting of the state section of the American Physical Society and the Astronomical Society of New York.

For more information, contact physics professors Shashi Kanbur, shashi.kanbur@oswego.edu, or Dale Zych, dale.zych@oswego.edu.

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