Health clinics set for week of April 7

The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the state Department of Health. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

The health department accepts cash or checks for payment. The department does not accept credit or debit cards. Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.  No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered during the week of April 7 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

** Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, April 8, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.

** Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

** HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St., Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

For more information, call the County Health Department, weekdays phone 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547. For information on rabies clinics, call 349-3564.

Dip in Lake Ontario April 5 raises money for Special Olympics

Freezin’ for a Reason!

More than 100 people will take a dive into the cold waters of Lake Ontario Saturday April 5 (today) for the second annual Polar Plunge for Special Olympics.

Sgt. Jim Cunningham, Officer Lysa Dolin, Officer Bryan Thompson and Officer Kevin Engle of the Oswego Police Department will lead the plunge carrying the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics “Flame of Hope.” Top fundraiser Cindy Tyler of Antwerp, Jefferson County, and team Jumping for Jake will lead the plunge in honor of Jake Tyler.

Jake Tyler, who worked as a pipefitter with a union in Oswego, is Cindy’s husband who was planning to take the plunge in Oswego to raise money for Special Olympics. But he died in March in a car accident.

The Oswego Polar Plunge will take place at Wright’s Landing, 21 Lake St. Registration and check in is from 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. with the plunge taking place at 1 p.m.

In conjunction, there also will be a chicken barbecue at Gibby’s Irish Pub from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Coffee and hot chocolate for registered Polar Plungers provided by Dunkin’ Donuts.

Polar Plunge and Special Olympic merchandise will be for sale.

Registration is still open www.PolarPlungeNY.org/Oswego. Participants can also register the day of the plunge, just bring collected cash and checks with you. All participants raising $100 or more receive a FREE official Polar Plunge sweatshirt.

Special Olympics is the largest amateur sports organization in the world.

Llewellyn ‘Red’ Calkins, veteran, enjoyed camping, hunting

4-5_OBITcalkinsLlewellyn “Red” Calkins, 79, of Fulton, went to be with the Lord on Friday, March 28, surrounded by his loving family.

Born in Lysander, he had lived in the Fulton–Volney areas for most of his life.

Red had retired in 1991 from the Oswego County Highway Department.

He enjoyed hunting, camping, spending time outside and making maple syrup.

Red was a member of the Fulton Alliance Church and enjoyed attending the Men’s Breakfasts.  He was an Air Force veteran.

He was predeceased by his parents, Lincoln and Ora Hart Calkins.

Red will be greatly missed and forever loved by his wife of 58 years, the former Janet Spaulding; children Randy, Ron (Paula), Richard and Renee (Rob) Warren; siblings, Noreen Pickard, Lincoln Calkins, Ora Lee Dorval and Denise Wisowaty; 11 grandchildren; several great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were April 1 with a service to immediately follow at Fulton Alliance Church. Contributions in memory of Red may be made to the church, 1044 State Route 48 South, Fulton, 13069.

Gordon M. Sheldon, dairy farmer

Gordon M. Sheldon, 78, of Granby,  passed away Sunday, at Oswego Hospital.

He was born in Syracuse and had resided most of his life in Granby.

Gordon owned and operated a dairy farm in Granby.

He was an Army veteran, serving from 1953-1956.

He is survived by his wife, Theresa of Granby; a son, Gordon J. (Mina) of Marietta, Calif.; a daughter, Camille J. (Douglas) Elkins of Liverpool; a brother, Robert (Ruth) Sheldon of Granby; two granddaughters, Alexandra and Katherine Elkins; several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were April 1 with a service to follow at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton.

Burial in the spring will be in Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton.

Contributions in memory of Gordon may be made to Catholic Charities, 365 W. First St. S., Fulton, 13069.

2 join Child Advocacy Center

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Karrie Damm, executive director of the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County, said Jennifer Delles and Jamie Butler have been accepted as interns at the CAC.

Delles, a graduate student at SUNY Oswego, has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Nazareth College and is pursuing a master’s degree in mental health counseling and certification in play therapy.

Butler, also a graduate student at SUNY Oswego, earned a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from SUNY Brockport and is studying for her master’s degree in mental health counseling and certification in trauma studies.

For Delles, her love of children made the CAC an easy choice for an internship.

“I always enjoyed working with children. I like everything about them; their energy, their enthusiasm, and the fact that they are so resilient. When my professor recommended the CAC for an internship I knew it would be a good fit for me,” said Delles.

While at Nazareth College Delles also served as an intern at the EquiCenter, a therapeutic horseback riding facility in Rochester.

At the EquiCenter, she worked with children with developmental delays and physical disabilities through the use of horses in a therapeutic setting.

“It was interesting to see them interact with the horses. I worked with them on grooming the horses, basic riding and horsemanship skills, games and other activities,” she said.

“It was cool to watch their progress and to see them transition from the ground to the horse. Once they were on the horse they sat up straight and lit right up, they loved being with the horses!” said Delles.

For Butler, her love of art and her concern for children came together quite naturally.

While working as an Ameri-Corps member at a school in Arizona, Butler was involved in program planning and events for children and their families. One of the experiences she had at the school had a significant impact on her.

“One young girl I worked with had several disabilities and found it difficult to connect with other people. When one of the other teachers realized this girl and I both shared a love of art she began sending her to my room,” Butler said.

“ She was very shy and had only drawn with pencils. I brought her some cool stuff to use and a sketchbook and we began spending time drawing together.  She eventually warmed up to me and spoke to me about her family,” she said.

“I really enjoyed working with her and it inspired me to go into the mental health field. I hope to incorporate art into what I do and eventually be certified in art therapy,” said Butler.

As interns at the CAC, Delles and Butler are involved with intakes and will be working closely with children, siblings and their parents.

They will assist in providing therapeutic intervention regarding all types of child abuse and their effects, safety and prevention education, and support to children during their recovery from the experience.

The opportunity to work with entire family unit is as an aspect of the CAC that greatly appealed both of them.

Delles and Butler began their practicum in January and will continue with their internships through the next three semesters.  Damm added the pair are a welcome addition as each brings with them their own unique strengths and talents.

“We are happy that Jennifer and Jamie will be serving their internship with us.  Their past experiences, their willingness to learn, and the compassion they have for the children and families we work with will serve them well,” said Damm.

Located at 301 Beech St., Fulton, the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County provides a wide range of free services to children who have been physically or sexually abused and provides a safe, child-friendly site for the investigation, prosecution and treatment of child abuse.

For more information on the CAC you may contact them at 315-592-4453, visit their website at www.oswegocac.org, or follow them on Facebook.

‘Searching for Eden’ on stage this weekend

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Adam (Peter Mahan) claims his territory from Eve (Kelly Mahan) in this scene from Searching for Eden: The Diaries of Adam and Eve returning for one weekend only, April 4 and 5 at 7:30 p.m., and April 6 at 3 p.m. at CNY Arts Center located at the 357 State St. Church in Fulton. Innocence and discovery, grief and forgiveness, joy and frustration are explored in the course of two becoming one in this romantic comedy by James Still. For tickets and reservations, visit CNYArtsCenter.Com or call 592-3373. Ticket price will include dessert.

Fulton woman charged with DWI while children are in the car

Dedich, Valeri
Dedich

 

Valeri R. Dedich, of Bakeman Street, Fulton, has been charged with driving while intoxicated while she had children in her car.

Fulton police said Dedich admitted to drinking alcohol and failed several field sobriety tests. the children were all under the age of 15 — one was in the front passenger seat, with the two others seated as rear passengers. The children were turned over to another adult who responded to the scene.

Dedich is charged with driving while intoxicated with a child, a felony; driving while intoxicated, a misdemeanor; driving while intoxicated with a blood alcohol count more than 0.08 percent, a misdemeanor; and failure to keep right, a violation.

Dedich was arraigned by Fulton City Court Judge David Hawthorne and released on her own recognizance. She is scheduled to return to court at 9 a.m. April 16. 

Forecast calls for fun, learning at Fairley Elementary

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

As winter draws to a close in Oswego County, fourth-graders at Hannibal’s Fairley Elementary School recently met with meteorologist Jim Teske to learn about the factors that contribute to the lake-effect snow that has blanketed the region all season long.

The TV weatherman delivered a presentation to nearly 100 students as they gained a better understanding about different weather phenomena.

From tornados to blizzards, the fourth-graders received information about what causes such events to occur.

They viewed weather maps, videos and even conducted their own weather experiment to demonstrated atmospheric changes.

With the assistance of fourth-grader Mackenzie Astle, Teske set a cotton ball on fire, dropped it into a glass bottle and set a hard-boiled egg on the top of the bottle. The burning cotton ball heated the air inside of the bottle and created some airflow between the top of the bottle and the egg. Once the flame was extinguished, the bottle cooled and a partial vacuum was created, sucking the egg into the bottle.

“When you have high pressure and you move to low pressure, you create air flow,” Teske explained. “The air inside the bottle was low pressure and outside was high pressure. Something has to give.”

In addition to the experiment demonstrating pressure fluctuations, students learned that lake-effect snow is caused by cool air traveling over a warm body of water such as Lake Ontario. Combine those factors with winds out of the north or northwest and the situation is prime for a lake-effect snow event, Teske said.

Armed with the knowledge of the lesson, the students said they would know what to look for when it comes to forecasting the weather.

 

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