News in Brief

The annual Spring Live and Silent Auction at Oswego Community Christian School is today (April 5) at the Elks Lodge in Oswego.

The silent auction is from 1 to 2:30 p.m. and the live auction is 2:30 to 4 p.m. There also are some special drawings.

Visit the school’s website at 22.myoccs.org for more information.

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The City of Fulton Department of Parks and Recreation is once again sponsoring Line Dance Instruction featuring popular dance instructor, Phil Eno.

Instruction will begin in the City of Fulton Municipal Building Community Room at 141 S. First St., Fulton, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8.

Registration will take place at the first class. There are fees for the class.

For more information, call 592-2474.

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A program titled “Breakfast and Brainfood: When You Wish Upon A Star” is scheduled for two days in April at the SUNY Phoenix Center.

Part I will be from 8 to 9:30 a.m. April 10 and Part II will be 8 to 9:30 a.m. April 24. The session is free and being put on by the Greater Oswego-Fulton chamber of Commerce.

During the sessions, participants will learn how to turn their business strategy into reality by evaluating seven key organizational elements, and harnessing their momentum to propel your organization forward.

Kelly Sullivan of CSTI-Core Skills, True Impact will share the principle drivers of organizational change along with practical tips that will help you to plan and execute your strategy.

Rich Burritt, of Burritt Motors, will share his insight and experience using those principles to dramatically improve the customer experience at his organization.

This sessions are free and open to the public. Please register either online at http://oswegofultonchamber.com/cwt/External/WCPages/WCEvents/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=962, by phone at 343-7681 or by email at membership@oswegofultonchamber.com

The Mexico Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday April 10 at the Wilcox building, Presbyterian Church, Church Street.

This first meeting of the year will include a brief business meeting followed by a program “The History of Vacuum Cleaners.”

May’s program will be the War of 1812, 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Big Sandy.  On June 12, the scheduled program is Historic Homes of Mexico presented by Historian Bonnie Shumway and Diane Miller.

The public is invited to all programs.

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The Hannibal Ecumenical Bake Sale is set for 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 12 at the Hannibal Village Market, IGA.

The money raised from the two bake sales each year are used to support The Hannibal Resource Center Thanksgiving Dinner Giveaway and the Hannibal Central School Christmas Bureau Giveaway.

The Ecumenical Key Council of the Churches Of Hannibal is made up of members of each of the village churches. The Council meets at 2:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at Our Lady of the Rosary Church.

Everyone is welcome.

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The Greater Fulton community is invited to meet city and county elected leaders at 5 p.m. April 12 at the First United Church of Fulton, 33 S. Third St., Fulton.

There will be free pizza and soda. Elected leaders will include Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward, Fifth Ward Councilor Jay Foster, Sixth Ward Councilor Lawrence Macner, and County Legislators Frank Castiglia Jr. and James Karasek.

The purpose of the event is to build better communication and understanding between citizens and their civic leaders, and to encourage neighborhood based cooperation and coordination. The conversations with the elected officials will be from 6 to 7 p.m.

This event is sponsored by the Open Doors Neighborhood Center, a community outreach ministry of the First United Church of Fulton.

For more information about the First United Church and our Open Doors Neighborhood Center, call the Rev. David Nethercott at First United Church at 592-2707 or email him at prairieborn@aol.com.

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There will be a chicken barbecue from noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday April 13 at the Granby Center Firehouse.

Both full dinners and chicken halves will be sold.

The next barbecue will be May 25.

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The Oswego Town Historical Society will host its April meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday April 16 at the Oswego Town Hall 2320 County Route 7.

The guest speaker will be Jim Farfaglia, who will present his new book “Of the Earth,” which is about muck farming in Oswego County and includes interviews with muck farmers of the area.

Muck farming was and is an important part of Oswego Town’s economy.  You will find the evening with Farfaglia informing and entertaining as he relates his experiences in gathering the information for his book.

The public is cordially invited.

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The First United Methodist Church in Fulton is presenting “Tenebrae, A Rock & Roll Easter Cantata” at 7:30 p.m. April 18 at the church at 1406 State Route 176 (across from the junior high).

Experience Good Friday in a different way. Join us for “Tenebrae, a Rock and Roll Easter Cantata,” performed by Sent Forth Ministries. Hear and experience the last hours of Jesus life in reflection and song.

All are welcome. A free will offering will be taken.

For further information, visit www.fultonfumc.org or phone the office at 592-7347.

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The Oswego Community Ecumenical Good Friday Cross Walk, again indoors, is being held at noon April 18 in the sanctuary at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 103 W. Cayuga St.

The service of prayer, reflection, silence, and song, will follow the traditional “Stations of the Cross,” the way of Jesus from his condemnation, through his crucifixion and burial on Good Friday.

The sanctuary is handicapped accessible and there is seating at each of the stations.  The service should be done by 1:15.

For more information, contact Roger Martin at Faith United Church, 343-3480, or Richard Klafehn, Grace Lutheran and Church of the Resurrection, 216-4416.

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Port City Faith will introduce a series titled “He Still Moves Stones” during its two Easter Services at 9 and 10:45 a.m. April 30.

The series will address many of the concerns and obstacles people in our community face: depression, anxiety, emotional disorders, relational struggles and many more applicable issues.

“There is a solution to these heartbreaking life struggles, I challenge you to join us for these services and find out what the answer is!” said Pastor Sebastian Foti.

This is the first time the church will present two Sunday services in order to accommodate the growth of the congregation as well as the holiday surplus in attendance.

Port City Faith has an upbeat style of service with contemporary worship and relevant preaching. Its intricate children’s church program is offered to grades pre-kindergarten through six, and nursery is also offered for those less than four years of age.

For additional information, visit www.portcityfaith.com or the church’s Facebook page.

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Oswego County’s Earth Week is April 25 through May 4.

Groups, nonprofits and organizations will get together at times during that week to help clean up areas of their communities.

For more information on the cleanup, go to www.oswewgocounty.com/earthweek.html or call 343-4565.

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Local author Jim Farfaglia, will give a discussion and photo slideshow about muck farming and its impact on the town of Volney and Oswego County at 2 p.m. April 27 at the Volney town hall.

Farfaglia will talk about his recently-published book on muck farming, including interviews and stories of local farmers, their families, neighbors, and workers.

Farfaglia’s book and a book title “Muck Farming in Volney” will be available.

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May Day (May 1st) is celebrated in many places around the world.

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County will celebrate May Day by teaching a quilting series, the May Basket Quilted Wallhanging.

This two-part workshop will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, May 1 and May 8. Participants will learn to sew their own May basket quilt blocks to assemble into a quilted wallhanging.

The cost is $16, which includes the instruction and pattern. This quilting program will be held at the Oswego County Cooperative Extension office in Mexico.

Call Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County at 963-7286 ext. 302 to register and also to receive a materials list. Registration deadline is Thursday April 24.

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The monthly meeting of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 56 in Fulton will be at 7 p.m. May 7 at the VFW, 216-218 Cayuga St., Fulton.

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Astrophysics symposium April 25-26 at SUNY Oswego

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego will host the “Astrophysics for the New Century” symposium April 25-26, featuring a keynote speech on computational astrophysics by a University of Rochester faculty member.

Dr. Adam Frank, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, will deliver a free, public talk at 7:15 p.m. Friday, April 25, in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

With interests at the intersection of astrophysical fluid dynamics, stellar evolution and supercomputer simulations, Frank will speak about his research in hypersonic outflows in stellar environments, which produce “some of the most beautiful structures in the night sky,” he said.

“Much of my work to date has focused on the origin and evolution of these outflows,” Frank said. “Currently my group is working to understand the formation of ‘bipolar’ (double-lobed) outflows at the extremes of stellar evolution.”

In addition to his research and teaching, Frank is a freelance science journalist with articles in Discover and Astronomy magazines.

Parking for Frank’s talk is available in the employee and commuter lots adjacent to and across Washington Boulevard from Sheldon Hall.

The symposium is a joint meeting of the state section of the American Physical Society and the Astronomical Society of New York.

For more information, contact physics professors Shashi Kanbur, shashi.kanbur@oswego.edu, or Dale Zych, dale.zych@oswego.edu.

Bishop’s Commons celebrates 14th anniversary

Residents and staff at Bishop’s Commons in Oswego gathered recently to mark the enriched living residence’s 14th anniversary of providing care and services for seniors in the community.

A special luncheon helped mark the milestone and afforded staff and residents alike an opportunity to celebrate together.

Addressing all those gathered for the event, Executive Director Karen Murray said the most important role Bishop’s Commons has played is providing for the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of residents in a setting that allows them to continue to be a part of the community they helped build.

As part of the day’s celebration, Murray took a moment to recognize a number of residents who have called Bishop’s Commons home for some time, including one who has lived at the enriched living residence for 12 years.

“No matter how long you have been with us,” observed Murray, “It has been a privilege to get to know each of you and each has added something unique and very special to our community.”

Murray also used the occasion to present awards to a number of Bishop’s Commons staff, some having been with the enriched living residence since the doors opened in 2000.

“In our 14 year history, Bishop’s Commons has served over 400 people from across our area, said Murray.

“During this time we are fortunate to have a number of dedicated staff that have a great deal of experience with our organization; experience that certainly benefits those who call Bishop’s Commons home and certainly reflects well on our organization,” she said.

Buccaneer Bulletin launches website

Buccaneer Bulletin, the official newspaper of Oswego High School, has begun a new website.

The website is accessed at www.buccaneerbulletin.com and opened for public access April 1.

“This has been a fun collaboration between the people at iHeart Oswego and the staff at Buc Bulletin,” said Rachel Purtell, webmaster of the new Buccaneer Bulletin website.

“We wanted a site that we could access, make changes to every day and had relevancy to the student body. iHeart helped make that happen for us,” she said.

“They donated their services, expertise and time to create an up-to-date, eye appealing website that offers the flexibility we needed. Students can access a gallery of photos taken by the staff, sports and clubs announcements, lunch menus and current weather conditions.”

“In addition you will be able to view the live feed from our Facebook page.” said Editor-in-Chief Tara Stacy. “We feel the new website will give our peers instant access to our content and will allow us to better adapt to the ever-changing world of journalism.”

The website will feature both current and past issues back to 2005.  The staff wants people who are more comfortable with online reading to be able to check out the newspaper from their computer, phone or tablet.

The online version will also offer additional advertising opportunities for businesses and organizations.

For more information about the Buccaneer Bulletin, call 341-2200 and ask for Room 129 and visit us on www.BuccaneerBulletin.com.

Program put SUNY Oswego students on bikes

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

The new SUNY Oswego Bike Share program provides refurbished bicycles to students up to a semester at a time to encourage fitness and cost savings while helping cut down on car trips.

Cycling and recycling come naturally to Alex Elkins, a senior technology education major and founder of SUNY Oswego Bike Share.

He races mountain bikes on a national level, rides about 10,000 miles year-round and works in a Rochester bicycle shop, where he applies skills he needed to learn to afford racing.

“We’re going to teach basic maintenance to borrowers. To those so inclined, we’ll teach advanced maintenance,” Elkins said. “That’s a big part of sustainability, along with fitness and saving gas — you can save a lot of money fixing your own bike.”

Bike Share’s headquarters are in the basement of Hewitt Union on campus, where students can apply for one of 15 bicycles the club has ready to go.

With other two-wheelers scavenged for parts, Bike Share has received about 25 donations of used bicycles from the Oswego community, Elkins and his contacts in Rochester, University Police and other campus staff, and from roadside discards.

Contact sustainability@oswego.edu to make a donation.

SUNY Oswego Bike Share has received assistance from the college’s Facilities Design and Construction office. Graduate assistant Jason MacLeod recruited Elkins and has helped him launch the program, and campus sustainability coordinators Mike Lotito and Jamie Adams encouraged the program with new tools, repurposed space in Hewitt Union and other startup necessities.

Adams and Lotito pointed out that vehicular traffic accounts for about a third of Oswego’s contribution to greenhouse gases as a lot of people drive around campus, as well as to and from it.

“The bike-sharing program is right up there on our roadmap for strategically reducing the college’s carbon footprint, and at the same time proving health and wellness on campus,” Adams said. SUNY Oswego, through its Climate Action Plan and the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, is pursuing strategies to reduce emissions up to 40 percent by 2020.

Elkins said Bike Share has built accountability into its program: statements of need, waivers, locks to go with each bicycle, encouragement to share the two-wheeler with others and, as experience and growth dictate, perhaps a deposit that includes a fee to help the program safeguard its investment and pay its way.

“I want to see people take responsibility for the bikes,” he said.

Elkins, who will student teach in technology this fall, said he minors in sustainability and comes by his interest in cycling through his parents, who both ride and minimize driving.

“Bike Share is right on point with what I’m interested in,” he said. “My passion is cycling and the outdoors. Why not share that in this way?”

For more information on sustainability initiatives at the college, visit www.oswego.edu/sustainability.

 

FULTON FAMILIES – The good earth: The Vescios’ roots go deep in Fulton

Front page – The Vescios gathered for youngest child June’s baptism in November 1934. This photo appeared with a story about the family in The Post-Standard. Photo courtesy of Sam Vescio
Front page – The Vescios gathered for youngest child June’s baptism in November 1934. This photo appeared with a story about the family in The Post-Standard.
Photo courtesy of Sam Vescio

Editor’s note: This is the seventh installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series will tell the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom, Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com. 

By Ashley M. Casey

“One of Fulton’s Largest Families: Vescio’s 12 Children Range From 5 Months to 18 Years” reads the 1934 Post-Standard clipping’s headline.

Although the story is 80 years old, it’s not unlike headlines found in The Valley News today. Now, the Vescios’ appearance in the local media has come full circle.

Of the 14 children born to Angelo and Rosina Vescio, only 12 lived to adulthood. Today, four of the original Vescio children are alive in Fulton: Joe, Sam, Ellen and June. Sam Vescio, now 87, and his daughter, Rosemary Vescio Pollard, shared their story of what keeps them in the city that their clan has called home for more than a century. Continue reading

Migrating geese focus of SUNY Oswego Quest Day presentation

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

Two SUNY Oswego students and a biological sciences faculty member are studying whether changing weather patterns affect the migratory paths and ecological relationships of Canada geese from northern Quebec.

They will share findings April 9 during the college’s annual Quest day.

Junior biology major Jeffrey Benjamin and junior meteorology and applied mathematics major Tyler Pelle have worked since last fall on the project with SUNY Oswego zoologist, ornithology specialist and faculty member Michael Schummer, in cooperation with the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

They are using high-end, temperature-sensing remote wildlife cameras for their study.

“We have to know what makes them migrate before we can determine what could change their patterns,” Schummer said of the geese. “What types of weather variables influence the behaviors of these geese?”

Benjamin has pored over thousands of photos of geese at the Junius Ponds Unique Area northwest of Waterloo, while Pelle has painstakingly correlated the cameras’ temperature data with that of the National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center, known for its ground-based, airborne and satellite snowfall analyses.

At the college’s Quest symposium April 9, the students will make two presentations — one focused on abundance and foraging patterns as a function of temperature of what is known as the Atlantic Population of Canada geese, the other on reliability of the cameras’ own weather data.

“I find more and more that if you are interested in waterfowl, you’ll need to consult with a meteorologist or a climatologist,” Schummer said. “It’s really fun, because it’s two different languages that have to meld together.”

Quest is the college’s daylong celebration of scholarship and creativity on campus. The young scientists’ project with Schummer benefited from a grant provided by the college’s Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee.

 Publications possible

Benjamin said the Reconyx PC 900 professional wildlife cameras went up at the Junius Ponds location in October and came down when the ponds froze over in January.

In the interim, the DEC-owned instruments took a photo every hour during daylight hours. At peak during the migration, the week of Dec. 6, Benjamin counted more than 1,000 birds on the pond each day.

Pelle and Benjamin also tracked the geese’s daily foraging flights and other movements, determined types and amounts of precipitation and tracked daily average temperature.

While both students are headed back to remount the cameras this spring, it will be Benjamin who carries the project forward this fall.

“I think that with another year’s worth of data, there’s capability to get this published in a regional journal, if not in a bird journal, and possibly presented at a regional conference,” he said.

Schummer, who with the assistance of graduate students has previously studied mallards’ migratory behavior in relation to climatic factors, agreed.

“My goal always with students is to present locally, regionally and internationally if you can, and to follow up with a peer-reviewed article,” he said. “I expect to keep these guys busy. It’s in their best interests — it really helps them if they go on to do master’s degrees.”

Visit www.oswego.edu/quest for more information, including times and locations for presentations.

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