News in Brief

As of April 30, 2014, The Valley News will accept classified advertisements only for the Wednesday and Saturday print editions.

We will no longer publish classifieds online. To submit a classified ad, call us at 598-6397 or visit our office at 67 S. Second St., Fulton.

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The  Art Association of Oswego and the SUNY Oswego Art Department are sponsoring a benefit dinner for Bill Demott to help defray medical costs  from his recent cardiac surgery.

Demott is an adjunct professor in the art departments at SUNY Oswego and at Cayuga Community College. He is a talented artist and the event coordinator for the Art Association of Oswego.

The benefit will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 12 at the Oswego Foundry. There will be a chicken barbecue, live music and a silent auction for a variety of art work and baskets donated from artists at SUNY Oswego and the Art Association.

There also will be a drawing for prizes, including a Labor Day getaway to New York City.  Live music will be provided by the Cortini Brothers, the Billionaires and Canvas Moon.

Tickets for dinner and the drawing may be purchased at the rivers end Bookstore in Oswego, the Oswego YMCA and also will be available at the door the evening of the event. Takeout orders for the chicken barbecue are available.

For further information regarding dinner and drawing ticket costs, visit the Art Association website at www.oswegoarts.org.

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Trinity United Methodist Church in Oswego will be serving an All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday April 12.

This will be the last one until fall. The menu includes your choice of French toast, waffles, or pancakes, sausage, juice, coffee or tea.

Extra sides may be purchased as well.

Trinity United Methodist Church is located at 45 E. Utica St., (corner of East Fourth at Utica Street) in Oswego.

For more information you may call the church at 343-1715.

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The Class of 1990 from G. Ray Bodley High School will have a 25th Reunion planning meeting at 7 p.m., Saturday, April 12 at the Lakeview Lanes Bar area.

All are welcome to attend.

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Port City Faith will introduce a series titled “He Still Moves Stones” during its two Easter Services at 9 and 10:45 a.m. April 20.

The series will address many of the concerns and obstacles people in our community face: depression, anxiety, emotional disorders, relational struggles and many more applicable issues.

“There is a solution to these heartbreaking life struggles, I challenge you to join us for these services and find out what the answer is!” said Pastor Sebastian Foti.

This is the first time the church will present two Sunday services in order to accommodate the growth of the congregation as well as the holiday surplus in attendance.

Port City Faith has an upbeat style of service with contemporary worship and relevant preaching. Its intricate children’s church program is offered to grades pre-kindergarten through six, and nursery is also offered for those less than four years of age.

For additional information, visit www.portcityfaith.com or the church’s Facebook page.

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Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the national Alzheimer’s Association, will present at DEMENTIACARE2014 on May 7 at the Doubletree By Hilton Hotel Syracuse.

Presented by the Alzheimer’s Association, Central New York Chapter, this third annual conference welcomes individuals caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease or a related form of dementia for a day of learning and empowerment.

Admission to the conference is $75 and includes a continental breakfast, lunch, refreshments and a resource guide.

Registration can be completed online at www.alz.org/cny, or by phone at 596-4016, extension 108 in Oswego County.

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A full day of events is planned at North Volney Methodist Church May 10.

There will be a used book sale from 9 a.. to 4 p.m. at the church with all kinds of books available to purchase. In additon to books, there also will be church and choir music, old sheet music, jigsaw puzzles, magazines and DVDs

Lunch will be available to those who get hungry and there is a bake sale for those who have a sweet tooth. Also, there will be a plant sale to help you get ready for summer in your yards.

A free gospel concert will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Groups scheduled to appear are The Misfits and Lake Effect Bluegrass.

The concert is a mix of country, traditional, bluegrass and contemporary gospel. The musicians donate their time to this event, but a free will offering will be taken to help them with expenses.

This is a one-stop event to fill your mind with good reading, your heart with good music, your stomach with good food and your yard with beautiful flowers.

North Volney Methodist church is located at the corners of County Routes 4 and 6 in the town of Volney.

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The Volney Farmers’ Market will reopen for the season June 3.

The market will be open 3 to 6 p.m. each Tuesday from June 3 through the end of September at the Volney Highway Department on State Route 3.

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The New Haven Farmers’ Market will reopen for the season June 2.

The market will be open from 3 to 6 p.m. each Monday from June 2 through the end of September.

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The Mt. Adnah Preservation Foundation, Inc. has established a memorial brick walkway at the site of the Case Memorial Chapel in Mt. Adnah Cemetery located on East Broadway, Fulton.

During the past several years, more than 215 inscribed memorial bricks have been placed in the walkway and there is room for several hundred more.

This is a loving way to remember your deceased loved ones and the public is invited to purchase memorial bricks for installation in this walkway, whether your loved one is buried in Mt. Adnah Cemetery, or elsewhere.

Each brick may contain a total of 18 characters and spaces on each of three lines. Bricks must be ordered by May 15 to be installed by Memorial Day.

The Foundation has been adding plantings to the garden at the Case Memorial Chapel site and there is a bench at the site for the public to use as a place for reflection and remembrance.  You are invited to visit the site while at the Cemetery.

For further information about the Memorial Bricks, call Brian Guyer at 592-2523 or email him at tigguy@twcny.rr.com.

Letters can be addressed to the Foundation at P. O. Box 715.Fulton, N. Y. 13069.

Future of Fulton Public Library rests on May 20 vote

By Ashley M. Casey

Voters in the Fulton City School District will have two decisions to make concerning the fate of the Fulton Public Library in the May 20 election: how it’s funded and who runs it.

The library is putting forth two propositions for next month’s elections. One would make  the library a school district library — solely funded by a tax that the district collects, eliminating the city of Fulton’s responsibility. The other puts the election of the board of trustees up to the voters as well. Currently, the city appoints trustees to the board. Continue reading

Shelly Schumaker Iorizzo, excellent cook, generous to others, devoted mother

Shelly Schumaker Iorizzo started her new life on April 1, 2014.

Shelly was 47 years old, survived by a loving family: her husband, Lou; their children, Tyler and Monica; stepchildren, Vanessa, Luciano III (Dana) and their two children Daniel and Lydia.

Shelly is also survived by her parents, Gary and Joy Schumaker; her sister, Sherry (Jim) Best; brother Wayne (Sarah) Schumaker and many nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles.

First and foremost, Shelly was a devoted mother. Her love was unconditional and gave her the determination to face terminal illness, enduring treatments willingly to give her one more month, week, day or minute with her children.

Shelly was all about relationships. Her sharp wit and laughter attracted many friends, especially her husband. Together, they built their life and family, making lasting relationships in New York, Massachusetts, Kentucky, Arizona and Virginia.

Shelly will be deeply missed for her passion for life and compassion for others. She was an excellent cook, the life of any party and overwhelmingly generous. Her selfless nature was present throughout her life.

Her final gift was the gift of sight through the donation of her corneas so that others may see life through her eyes.

There was a service held in Williamsburg, Va. Sunday, April 6.

Family and friends will also celebrate Shelly in her hometown of Hannibal, NY Thursday, April 10 at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St., Hannibal. Calling hours are from 2 to 5 p.m. with service to follow.

Shelly’s lifelong love of music can be honored through memorial contributions to the Williamsburg Music Club, P.O. Box 1808, Williamsburg, VA  23187.

View from the Assembly

By state Assemblyman Will Barclay

The 2014-15 New York state budget passed again on time for the fourth year in a row and we kept state operating spending at under 2 percent growth.

The $137.9 billion spending plan contains some good news for New Yorkers, but did fall short on other aspects.

The budget restores $602 million of the Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA) for school districts. I was glad to see this in the final budget bill, as this allocation directly benefits our local schools.

A $2.7 billion funding cut to schools took place in 2011 when our state spending continued to be higher than  revenues following the recession. Since then, the funding has gradually increased but this year, we made a big step towards getting more funds to schools and increased school aid by $1.12 billion.

In addition, I was pleased libraries saw an increase of $1 million more than last year and the  proposed funding cut that was in the Executive’s budget was rejected. Instead, libraries are funded at $86.6 million.

This budget enacted tax cuts for manufacturers. We also raised the estate tax exemption amount from $1 million to be $5.25 million by 2017; by 2019, New York will be in line with the federal level.

Though I would have liked to have seen these changes be effective immediately, I’m glad we’re making these significant policy changes with this budget and will eventually subject fewer people to the estate tax.

Estate tax cuts are especially significant for farmers, as this reduction makes inheriting property easier.

Manufacturing tax cuts will make our state more competitive when attracting and keeping business in our region as businesses consider taxes as part of their overall cost of doing business; if these are lower, it makes it New York more attractive.

We also were  able to phase out 18-A, the energy assessment utilities pay, which is passed down to all consumers. Though this wasn’t eradicated entirely this year, it is on schedule to be in 2017.

Localities in Central and Northern New York will directly benefit from a $40 million winter recovery fund. This is a new allocation created in this budget to help localities cover expenses related to pothole repair. This is on top of a $75 million increase we saw last year to (Consolidated Highway Improvement Program) CHIPs.

This budget provides $27 million for local agricultural assistance programs. This too was welcome news, as the Governor’s proposed budget contained cuts to many agricultural programs.

Through negotiations, we were  able to not only restore that funding but also to increase it from  $21 million that was allocated year. Funding for apple growers, maple producers, berry growers and dairy groups was restored.

Changes to Common Core were also codified in the budget. While we were not able to pass a moratorium on Common Core as I and many had hoped, we were able to put into law many of the changes proposed by the Regents and prohibit standardized testing for grades K-2.

The legislature also passed student data protection measures and required the Commissioner of Education to put in place standards and regulations that would limit time devoted to state testing in the classroom.

Finally, this budget enacts much-needed reforms to public assistance. I have pressed for these sensible measures for years and this budget finally puts limitations on how electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards are used.

Recipients will no longer be allowed to use them at liquor stores, casinos or adult-entertainment establishments. Penalties were instituted for such businesses who accept the cards.

Unfortunately, however, no penalties were instituted for recipients.

The spending plan passed in 10 separate budget bills. I voted “yes” on 8 out of the 10 bills, but could not support any form of publicly-financed campaigns or commitment to funding the Affordable Care Act, which was supposed to be self-sustainable.

Although the budget did not contain the governor’s outrageous proposal to publicly finance all state races, it did contain a compromise: This year, the State Comptroller’s race will involve public dollars.

I oppose publicly-financed campaigns in any form. I fear too that this concession will pave the way for others.

I also voted against an allocation of $24 million for the Affordable Care Act. This was supposed to be self-sustainable.

Unfortunately, the budget passed with this measure included and now New Yorkers will be paying for the botched federal mandate.

The budget also fails to provide mandate relief. At the same time that the state required localities to stick to a 2 percent tax cap, which was a good measure, we have not given them the tools to do so by cutting state mandates such as Medicaid, costs associated with early intervention, public assistance, and indigent defense.

If you have any questions or comments or if you would like to be added to my mailing list or receive my newsletter, contact my office by mail at 200 N. Second St., Fulton, New York 13069, by e-mail at barclaw@assembly.state.ny.us or call 598-5185.

Walter E. Everson, Army veteran, worked for many local companies

Walter E. Everson, Sr., 83, of Fulton, passed away Thursday evening April 3 at home with his family by his side.

He was born in Bundyville, a son to the late Wilbur and Irene Everson.  Walt lived in Michigan for several years before moving to Syracuse and eventually returning to Fulton. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army.

Walt worked at Syracuse China, MacCordy Machine, Tool and Die Corp. and Foster Bros. Cutlery, Inc. Also, he was a truck driver for several local companies.

In addition to his parents, Walter is predeceased by his first wife, Cora Everson; two sons, Walter Everson, II and James Everson; three sisters, Vivian, Peggy and Marion Everson; two brothers, Wesley and William Everson.

Walter is survived by his wife of 48 years, Susan Potter Everson of Fulton; four children, Sonja Jane (Art) Holtzinger of Indiana, Brian (Penny) Everson of Fulton, Rose (Don) Benjamin of Watkins Glen,Vicki Mayer of Florida and Michael (Katrina) Everson of South Carolina; a sister, Virginia Dennison of Fulton; several grandchildren, great grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were Tuesday, April 8 with services following at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay St., Fulton. Burial will be in Mount Adnah Cemetery, Fulton.

Contributions in memory of Mr. Everson may be made to Friends of Oswego County Hospice, P.O. Box 102, Oswego, NY 13126 or to a charity of one’s choice.

Ronald March, Army veteran, carpenter

Ronald M. March, 80, of Fulton, passed away Tuesday April 1 at Oswego Hospital.

He was born in Lacona, NY, a son to the late Moses and Mae March.

Ron graduated from Cato-Meridian High School in 1951 and enlisted into the U.S. Army in 1953, where he served his nation until his honorable discharge in 1955.

Ron was a carpenter with the Carpenter’s Local #12, Syracuse.

He was a life member of the Fulton V.F.W. #569 and the B.P.O.E. Lodge #830, Fulton. Ron enjoyed bowling and spending time on his farm.

He is predeceased by a son, Michael, who died Dec. 21, 1957.

Ronald is survived by his wife of 22 years, Mary M. March of Fulton; four children, Judith White of Pulaski, Timothy March of Red Creek, Thomas March of Fulton and Jeffrey March of Fulton; three step-children, Robert Hines of Fulton, Joseph Hines of Mexico and Sherry Hines of Fulton; a brother, Ralph March of Oswego; several grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren.

There are no calling hours or funeral services. Foster Funeral Home, Fulton has care of arrangements.

AmeriCorps donates fleece blankets to families in need

Submitted by Oswego County

Oswego County AmeriCorps members recently donated more than 40 fleece blankets to the Oswego County Health Department’s Maternal Child Health Program for families in need.

The blankets were created by AmeriCorps members as a special project in recognition of Martin Luther King Day.

AmeriCorps Program Assistant Carrie Victory and Program Coordinator Kathy Andolina assisted with the project.

“Currently we have more than 20 AmeriCorps members serving throughout Oswego County, providing mentoring or  fitness education and nutrition activities,” said Andolina.

“Several more members recently started in our new Economic Opportunity grant. These members provide financial literacy and housing services to qualified individuals through the Department of Social Services, Oswego County Opportunities, and Catholic Charities,” she said.

Oswego County AmeriCorps is accepting applications for the summer AmeriCorps program. Members will provide fitness education and nutrition activities to youth around Oswego County.

Summer members serve 300 hours, receive a living allowance of $2,113 and an education award of $1,175.

For more information, contact the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau at 349-3451 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3451.

 

Hannibal spring sports rosters

Here are students participating in spring sports in the Hannibal school district.

Information is courtesy of the Hannibal Central School District.

Baseball

Seniors Greg Hadcock, Anthony Page; juniors Colten Cannova, Bryce Cassen, Troy Landis, Jorge Padua, Austin Mattison, Sam McCraith, Shane Sweeting; sophomores Jon Combes, Matt Combes, Blake Farnham; freshmen Taber Carter, Kenny Maynes, Ethan Straub

Coach: Scott Leonard

Softball

Seniors Samantha Bowers, Carolina Nicol, Malana Scott, Sabrina Weigand; juniors Catrina Deveney, Hailey Dunsmoor, Kurstin Hammond, Bailey Milliken, Amanda Ryan, Alyssa Sivy; sophomores Julia Beaumont, Megan Norris, Mackenzie Stevens, Kate Thompson; freshmen Dallas Voss, Katie Woodworth

Coach: Dave Meeker

Boys’ Track and Field

Freshmen, William Bullock, Mathew Graham, Jacob Hatten, Jared Mason, Jason McFarland, Connor McNeil, Austin Quale, Nate Raymond, Kyle Shoults, Joel Thompson, Andrew Wheeler; sophomores Austin Baker, Ben Bowers, Owen Braun, Austin Fenske, John Motell, Brian Whorrall; juniors Austin Donhauser, Benjamin Harrell, Zachary Hartranft, Nathan Welling; seniors Joshua Darrow, Sean Lange, Dustin Ouellette, Zane Pointon, Benjamin Raymond, Hans Reichow, Benjamin Slate

Coach: Dom Pike

College intern: Ben Griffin

Girls’ Track and Field

Eighth grade — Kiersten Abbott, Reilly Harris, Cassie Long, McKenzie Matteson; freshmen — Sydney Alton, Callie Cacchione, Janejira Cooper, Abigail Harrell, Paige LaFurney, Antoinette Lanning, Alexis Lathrop, Vanessa Waldron, Abby Weldin; sophomores — Tayler Dence, Amanda Gardenier, Katherine Martinez, Taylor McLaughlin, Amanda Miano, Rebekah Mills; juniors — Olivia Cacchione, Kristen D’Angelo, Ashley Hatten, Micheala Sheldon; seniors — Ketevan Chapiashvili, Marina Esanu, Gabrielle Griffin, Page McKenzie, Devin Sorell, Jessica Stauring

Coach: Dan Pawlewicz

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