Heavy equipment students head for the dirt

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Spring has sprung and the students in Oswego County BOCES’ Heavy Equipment Maintenance and Operations program are ready to work in the dirt!

The curriculum for the program is aligned with the National Utility Contractors Association, and provides adult education students an opportunity to prepare for careers in the commercial and/or residential construction industry through classroom and hands-on training.

Pictured above are students Leroy Rayner, left, and Dan Kidd participating in one such hands-on exercise. The pair are utilizing a transit level to measure the depth of a path dug by a classmate operating a dozer during a grading and level exercise. For more information about the  program or other programs offered through the Adult Education Department, visit www.OswegoBOCES.org or call 963-4256.

Learning bike safety

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Safety Sue, the bike safety puppet, operated by Fairgrieve elementary sixth-grader Samantha Humphrey, accompanied Billie Crandall Brady from the Oswego County Traffic Safety Board, talks to students at the Fulton school about the importance of wearing your helmet while riding your bike, skate board, scooter or in-line skates. The students were given special smoke free message tattoos and were told that healthy brains are safe brains. All the rules of the road were discussed – riding on the right side and making full and complete stops at stop signs and stop lights. Brady also told everyone about an opportunity to learn to ride on a bike course from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 31 at the Fulton War Memorial. The free event, sponsored by the Fulton Police Department, will feature new helmets from the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee and refurbished bikes from Doyle’s Bike Shop in Fulton given to children who can’t afford one. The event also will have a tricycle course, pedal cars, bouncy houses, crafts and free lunch.

 

Historical Fulton, NY

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Foster Brothers Knife Works was a well-known manufacturing company on West First Street in Fulton from 1878 to 1979. At its peak, more than 135 people churned out all types of knives at the factory. Employment dwindled to 19 people by 1977. The company was started by brothers Frank and Allie Foster, who had developed a method for tempering steel for machine knives used in paper mills. The knives earned a local reputation for being of good quality and farmers started using them on their hog carcasses. Then other people started using the knives for other purposes. Younger brothers J.A. and C.F. Foster expanded the business into other types of knives. At one time, the company made knives of 500 different sizes, shapes and styles. The largest was a 4-foot-long splitting knife used by meat packers. The smallest (no size was specified) was used to dress poultry. Handles were made of wood from Panama and Nicaragua and rosewood and ebony from South America and Africa. J.A. Foster from the company went on to become Fulton’s first mayor. This photo shows workers at the plant in 1904. Information supplied by the Friends of History at the Pratt House.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Oswego High art students honored

Brenna Riley earned the “Best of Show” at the annual Oswego County Student Art Competition with this piece of artwork named “Oliver”.
Brenna Riley earned the “Best of Show” at the annual Oswego County Student Art Competition with this piece of artwork named “Oliver”.

Submitted by Oswego schools

Oswego High School artist Brenna Riley won the “Best of Show” with her beautiful self-portrait graphite drawing “Oliver” while Carrie Gilbert and won “First Place “overall with her amazing detail drawing “Clarinet” as the Oswego County Student Art Competition.

The judging at the annual juried show for high school and junior high school students took place at the Salmon River Fine Arts Center in Pulaski.

This competition, which is open to all Oswego County school districts, attracted over 500 art pieces.

Oswego High School art teacher Melissa Martin said, “This is the first time Oswego has walked away with both the ‘Best of Show’ and ’First Place’ overall”.

Oswego students also were recognized for their work with seventh through ninth grade honorable mention ribbons were presented to Jessica Godden, Madelyne Cortright, Marissa Familo-Bennett and Mikayla Trapasso.  Tenth through twelfth grade students earning honorable mention included Aviriana Follet, Danielle Boyzuck, Katie Bradshaw, Kayla Volkomer, Makayla Carson, Morgan Knopp, Rebecca North, Sarah Hoefer and Teo Patty.

Students who also had their work accepted to the show included Allison Choate, Andrew Bornheimer, Bailey Glennen, Faith Hannock, Heavenly Noel, Jessica Godden, Nicholas Brown, Skylar Wallace, Sophia Griffith, Abigail Douglas, Alyssa Lapetino, Brianna Bush, Isabella Sabatini, Julie May, Katherine Hill, Madelyne Cortright, Margo McBearty and Michaela Bradshaw.

Also: Tegan Boyzuck, Abigail Allen, Chrisan Cabanlig, M’Kenzie Bradshaw, Molly Brown, Samantha Lee, Tatiana Berkley, Taylor Hamer, Tiffany Billington, Alaina Galutz, Alex Bush, Amber Lagoe, Brandi Hibbert, Courtney Johnson,  Elizabeth Sincavage, Jessica Morgan, Kelsey Wilder, Marissa Familo-Bennett, Morgan Butterfield, Morgan Haynes, Nathan Greene, Ricky Bristol, Sarah Dahar, Travis Cowles, Alexandra DeSacia, Allie Henderson, Reilly Patrick, Meghan Anderson, Mike Edwards and Tara Lagoe.

 

Bodley business group elite in New York

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The G. Ray Bodley chapter of the Future Business Leaders of America continues to be among the elite in the state as several members recently took home top honors in the regional competition.

FBLA co-advisers Danielle House and Angela Ferlito said the students set the bar high during the District 9 event held Feb. 7 in Liverpool.

The state competition is in April.

Some of those elite competitors include Laura Hamdan, Angeline Kimbrell, Kim Ingersoll, Meriah Dishaw and Yusra Hanayun, who each tallied first-place. Other Fulton FBLA members who earned a spot in the Top 3 included Kari Holbrook (second place), Kim Rombough (third place), and Tattiana Pierce (third place).

In addition to competitions, the Fulton chapter of the business association has conducted fundraising for many causes.

“They’ve done fundraising for the March of Dimes, the Ronald McDonald House (and) the Golisano Children’s Hospital,” Ferlito said. “They put in a lot of time and effort to be part of FBLA.”

Oswego firm hires Laird

Laird
Laird

Your On Call Assistant welcomes Julie Laird as managing assistant.

Laird brings with her 10-plus years of experience in project management, events management and fundraising in various industries.

She has a bachelor’s degree in hospitality sales and meeting management and an associate’s degree in hotel restaurant management from Johnson & Wales University.

Your On Call Assistant is an Oswego-based virtual assistant company offering virtual administrative and bookkeeping services to small businesses and entrepreneurs around the world.

For more information, contact Jodi Marvin at 806-0952, jodim@youroncallassistant.com or Julie Laird at 216-4004, julie@youroncallassistant.com or visit their web site at www.YourOnCallAssistant.com.

Hodgepodge

Bands Were Big!

I have enjoyed the music from the “Big Band” era for many years.

The “Big Band” era and the musical sound called “swing” began in the late 1930s. There were hundreds of popular big bands during that period in the 30s and 40s, and your parents and grandparents may have danced to some of them.

Some of the most popular bands included Ray Anthony and his orchestra, Louis Armstrong’s orchestra, Louie’s wife, Lil Hardin Armstrong and her orchestra, the bands of Charlie Barnett, Count Basie, Tex Beneke, Bunny Berrigan and Les Brown.

Bob Crosby’s Bob Cats and the Dorsey Brothers, Jimmy and Tommy and their orchestras, Ray Eberle’s band, the Roy Elbridge, Duke Ellington and the Les and Larry Elgart orchestras were also active.

Also included were Ziggy Elman, Maynard Ferguson, Ella Fitzgerald’s orchestra, Dizzy Gillespie, the Benny Goodman and Jackie Gleason bands (yes, that Jackie Gleason), Lionel Hampton, Erskine Hawkins, Fletcher Henderson and Woody Herman.

Ina Rae Hutton was the leader of an “all-girl orchestra” and dancers and listeners were enjoying the bands led by Harry James, Louis Jordan, Sammy Kaye, Hal Kemp, Stan Kenton, Andy Kirk, Kay Kyser and drummer Gene Krupa.

Also on the road were Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians, Jimmy Lunceford, Wingy Manone, Billy May, Glenn Miller and Ozzie Nelson (Ricky’s father), as well as the Tony Pastor, Don Redman and Luis Russell orchestras.

Artie Shaw and his Big Band, singer Maxine Sullivan and her all-stars, the Jack Teagarden orchestra, as well as his other smaller groups, were traveling from city to city as were Tommy Tucker, Fats Waller, Chick Webb, Teddy Wilson, Paul Whiteman and Sy Zentner with their bands.

Whew, and that’s only part of the 30s and 40s big band lineup. During World War II, the Big Bands boosted morale throughout the world.

Ish Kabibble

The Kay Kyser Big Band was one of the Big Band era’s most successful groups.  The band had 11 number one records, 35 top 10 hits, a top-rated radio show for 11 years, starred in seven feature films, and outdrew the Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman orchestras.

Ish Kabibble was one of the band’s feature characters, created by Merwyn Bogue, who played cornet in the Kyser band.

The name came from Bogue’s comedy version of an old Yiddish song, “Isch Ga Bibble.” Loosely translated it means “I Should Worry?” which he performed with the Kyser orchestra.

The public and the band started calling him “Ish” and the name stuck.

Michael (Mike) Douglas (not the actor who is Kirk’s son), a name you might recognize – Mike was the lead voice on many Kyser hits (Ol’ Buttermilk Sky, “The Old Lamplighter”).  He was best known to American television viewers as a singing variety/talk show host.

“All or Nothing at All”

One of the world’s most popular singers emerged during the 30s after singing “All or Nothing at All” on a Major Bowes amateur radio broadcast, fronting a quartet known as “the Hoboken Four.”

Frank Sinatra (“Ol’ Blue Eyes”, “The Voice”, “Chairman of the Board”, “Swoonatra” and “Sultan of Swoon”) sang during the Big Band era with the bands of Harry James and Tommy Dorsey.

He went solo at the Paramount Theater in New York in 1942. His first of hundreds of record hits was “All or Nothing at All.”

Sinatra was indeed “Chairman of the Board” of the company he founded, Reprise Records, in 1960. Along with Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop, Sinatra was a member of “The Rat Pack.”

The Market

One of our favorite Saturday morning activities is to visit the Regional Market.  Admittedly, the market isn’t as exciting this time of year as it is in mid-summer through late fall when it is busting out with the fresh home-grown produce of those seasons.

But even on a Saturday in late March there are treasures to be found.

My wife was happy with the sack of yellow potatoes, which she says are hard to find in supermarkets – and make the most delicious mashed potatoes and French fries.

My market tastes are more likely to lean away from carrying a 10-pound sack of potatoes around to standing in line for free samples of everything from chocolate chip cookies to pretzels covered with   “maple-flavored crème” to hunks of bread dipped in “politely spicy” hot tomato sauce.

(Question: “How much spice makes something to be impolite?”)

Also free for the taking and perfect as part of my late Saturday morning breakfast were hunks of cheese and sausages and hands full of tasty crackers slathered with all kinds of dips and spreads.

I think the top attention-grabber of the day on our recent visit to the market might have been a bright green “Spinachburger.”

The market seems to be a popular social hub on Saturday visits. Recently, we have met up with friends from Syracuse, from Fulton as well as from our own neighborhood.

There is a lot of everything at the Regional Market. Sometimes the only thing that you might have some difficulty finding is a good parking spot.

 

. . . Roy Hodge

Valley Viewpoints

Internet wine sales

At a time when online shopping continues to grow nationally, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is smart to launch bold initiatives to promote New York’s growing technology sector.

Already the state ranks third in the nation for technology jobs, according to the trade group TechAmerica. That is why it is so surprising that the state’s policy on one important element of e-commerce is anything but clear.

Across the nation, the vast majority of states have embraced Internet wine sales — seeing the benefits they have for consumers, businesses, and government revenue.

These states have issued guidance to Internet wine sellers, and have interpreted existing laws to match the realities of the modern economy.  In New York, however, regulators have issued no rules for online sales, and might even curtail Internet sales — a policy better suited to 1934 than to 2014.

Access to e-commerce is a vital issue for rural New Yorkers. Online sales enable growth of local businesses by giving them access to a larger distribution channel and, consequently, the ability to penetrate new markets.

For consumers, online sales promote competition, lowering prices on everything from food to books to clothing.  E-commerce forces companies to offer higher quality products and better customer service.

And, most critically for rural New Yorkers, buying online brings products from the far reaches of the world straight to their doorsteps, all with a few keystrokes and a click of a mouse.

Buying wine online is no different. As recently as a decade ago, New Yorkers were limited to the few wines they could find in local wine shops.

The Internet changed that, with wines of all varietals and regions available instantly. This is especially important to New Yorkers in rural areas and small towns who otherwise have few choices.

Consumers can compare prices on their favorite wines. Efficiencies of scale bring lower prices across the board. Ordering wine for home delivery is easy and convenient (with appropriate safeguards to ensure only adults can buy it).

But the state Liquor Authority — which regulates wine sales — seems to suffer from Internet-phobia. It seems more focused on protecting 80 years of status quo than embracing the realities of the 21st century.

E-commerce moves at a much faster pace, and on a much larger scale, than what regulators are accustomed to. It takes a lot of businesses to run a large-scale e-commerce site, from inventory managers and payment processers to website designers.

These businesses support the retailers who actually sell the wine, but do not sell it themselves. Yet the State Liquor Authority is considering vastly expanding its regulatory framework to capture these businesses.

The state needs sensible guidance that reflects the 21st century economy, not sweeping new regulation that will prevent hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers from shopping online.

The reality is with 70 percent of consumers shopping online, and 80 percent of those using mobile devices, online shopping has opened up more retail avenues for consumers across the country.

A consumer in Herkimer County can purchase antiques from Virginia or lobster from Maine or barbecue sauce from Kansas City with simply a few clicks on their laptop. The same consumers should enjoy their flexibility and convenience when it comes to a Napa red or Finger Lakes Riesling.

At 21st Century Consumers, we support efforts to increase consumer selection and enhance the e-commerce experience. Visit our website at www.21centuryconsumers.org/ny for more information.

John R.D. Celock

Executive Director

21st Century
Consumers

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