WRVO wins Murrow Award

SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media earned a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association for “New York in the World,” a documentary based on research by famed broadcast journalist the late Garrick Utley, who was SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism. From left are WRVO news director Catherine Loper, documentary producer Sidsel Overgaard and senior producer Mark Lavonier.
SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media earned a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association for “New York in the World,” a documentary based on research by famed broadcast journalist the late Garrick Utley, who was SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism. From left are WRVO news director Catherine Loper, documentary producer Sidsel Overgaard and senior producer Mark Lavonier.

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

“New York in the World,” a documentary produced by SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media, has won a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association.

The association has honored outstanding achievements in electronic journalism with the Murrow Awards since 1971.

Award recipients demonstrate the spirit of excellence that Murrow set as a standard for the profession of electronic journalism.

The hourlong “New York in the World” was produced by Sidsel Overgaard, a nationally recognized public radio reporter and contributor to WRVO; Mark Lavonier, senior producer; and Catherine Loper, director of news and public affairs.

The late Garrick Utley, who was a veteran journalist and SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism, hosted the show and spent much of last year collaborating on and working to produce the documentary.

“We received the news that WRVO was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Award for ‘New York in the World’ with a mixture of great pride and deep sadness that collaborator and narrator Garrick Utley, one of the most distinguished international journalists of his era, will share the honor posthumously, having succumbed to cancer in February,” General Manager Michael S. Ameigh said.

Ameigh describes “New York in the World” as Utley’s project.

The documentary is based on research Utley commissioned as head of the SUNY Levin Institute, which promotes thoughtful engagement and an active response to globalization and its impact on New York state.

“That he invited WRVO to produce the documentary is in itself profoundly gratifying,” Ameigh said.

“New York in the World” shares stories of union workers in Buffalo, fashion designers in New York City and farmers in the Finger Lakes — all talking about how they’ve found a place amid the current economic realities.

In this era of globalization, no other state has benefited as much and suffered as much as New York, the documentary said. The documentary chronicles residents’ lives and their futures by examining the bonuses, bailouts and wealth on Wall Street; the remains of once-mighty manufacturing littering Upstate New York; and more.

To hear the documentary or read a transcript, visit http://bit.ly/1tytzri.

For more information, call 312-3690 or visit www.wrvo.org.

Minetto Cub Scouts learn first aid

The Minetto Cub Scout Pack 819 went on a “Go See It” to the Minetto Fire Department to learn about first aid. The scouts got a hands-on demonstration with firefighters Dan Buske and Tyler Vosseller showing the scouts what needed to be done in a situation when camping, hiking or riding a bike. Pictured left to right are firefighter Tyler Vosseller,  Jason Rodriguez, Kai Clary, Caden Inch, Logan Inch, Trey Tesoriero and firefighter Dan Buske.
The Minetto Cub Scout Pack 819 went on a “Go See It” to the Minetto Fire Department to learn about first aid. The scouts got a hands-on demonstration with firefighters Dan Buske and Tyler Vosseller showing the scouts what needed to be done in a situation when camping, hiking or riding a bike. Pictured left to right are firefighter Tyler Vosseller,
Jason Rodriguez, Kai Clary, Caden Inch, Logan Inch, Trey Tesoriero and firefighter Dan Buske.

Program to cut smoking in pregnancy begins May 1 in Oswego County

On May 1, a new program called “Smoke Free For My Baby & Me” will be rolled out in Oswego County.

The program supports pregnant women’s efforts to quit using tobacco during their pregnancy and to abstain from smoking after delivery. This program has been made possible thanks to community partnerships and financial support from multiple parties.

The “Smoke Free For My Baby & Me” program will have its primary site at Oswego County OB/GYN and will enroll qualified pregnant women.

Participating women successfully abstaining from smoking will receive diapers for their babies each month. Clinical, online and social media support will be available for these women in their cessation process.

Various measurements will take place throughout the project to evaluate the programs’ success. For more information, call Oswego County OB/GYN at 343-2590.

Plans for the program started about a year ago when Oswego County agencies with public health concerns came together via the Rural Health Network. They realized smoking was still a big issue in the county even though smoking rates were dropping across the state.

State data reveals 32 percent of adults smoke in Oswego County as compard to 18 percent in New York state.

Furthermore, a community tobacco survey conducted by Tobacco Free Network indicated young smokers are more willing to quit smoking than their elders, and female smokers are more willing than their male counterparts.

Taking all of this into consideration, this group decided to focus their efforts on smoking cessation during pregnancy, noting this will benefit both the woman and her child(ren).

The Tobacco Free Network, part of the Integrated Community Planning of Oswego County, Inc. had the expertise in addressing tobacco issues; Oswego County OB/GYN wanted to aid smoking women’s cessation efforts as they seek prenatal and postpartum care; the WIC Program of Oswego County Opportunities was naturally making connections with many young women in the county; and faculty from the Department of Communications at SUNY Oswego was willing to provide technical program assessment support.

But money was a problem. Many agencies had seen funding cuts, so no one was sure where the money for this project would come from.

“We can do it as long as we stay together,” said Christina Wilson, executive director of Integrated Community Planning.

The various groups stayed together and the team expanded. Oswego Hospital brought their tobacco cessation counseling experience to the team; the Tobacco Cessation Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center came with a Performance Improvement Project for physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners; the Northern Oswego County Health Services, Inc. approached the team with the vast rural area it serves.

But a lack of money was still the biggest challenge the team faced.

The first breakthrough in securing funds was the successful application for a Community Health Award grant from Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

The Oswego County Health Department, Oswego County Opportunities and Integrated Community Planning worked together in the application process and the project was one of seven projects selected from more than 60 applications.

Oswego County OB/GYN also successfully applied to Fidelis Care for the purchase of needed equipment. The United Way of Greater Oswego County, Rural Health Network and the Oswego Elks Club came with money to support the diaper incentives for successful program participants.

Most recently, the Oswego County Health Department was notified the New York State Health Foundation will provide up to $26,000 in matching funds to support this project.

The foundation’s mission is to expand health insurance coverage, increase access to high-quality health care services and to improve public and community health.

As the funds were coming, other preparations for “Smoke Free For My Baby & Me” were under way as well.

Integrated Community Planning developed project materials; St. Joseph conducted a training session; the county health department Integrated Community Planning, Oswego OB/GYN, OCO, Oswego Hospital and Northern Oswego County Health Services Inc., now have staff trained; Oswego OB/GYN developed participant applications; SUNY Oswego refined assessment tools.

Everything is ready for the project to launch May 1.

“Partnerships are the best approach to solve many public health issues in the county,” said Jiancheng Huang, Oswego County director of public health.

He noted pregnant women who smoke are only a small portion of smoking adults and the group must not stop here. The county has many public health issues to address; such as childhood and adult obesity, excessive drinking and drug abuse.

“We need broad partnerships like this to get individuals and institutions involved in improving our community health,” he added.

Oswego Health honors volunteers, auxiliary members

Two volunteers at Oswego Hospital were cited during a special volunteer luncheon for the number of hours they have given to the hospital. At left is Maurice “Mo” Laws, who volunteered 3,522 hours this year at Oswego Hospital, nearly double what he volunteered the previous year. At right is Emma Corrdaino, who has volunteered for 28 years, the longest of any volunteer. Standing left are Amy Oralls, who has volunteered for 1,074 hours, more than double the number she volunteered last year. Standing at right is Debbie Hough, who has been a volunteer for 10 years.
Two volunteers at Oswego Hospital were cited during a special volunteer luncheon for the number of hours they have given to the hospital. At left is Maurice “Mo” Laws, who volunteered 3,522 hours this year at Oswego Hospital, nearly double what he volunteered the previous year. At right is Emma Corrdaino, who has volunteered for 28 years, the longest of any volunteer. Standing left are Amy Oralls, who has volunteered for 1,074 hours, more than double the number she volunteered last year. Standing at right is Debbie Hough, who has been a volunteer for 10 years.

Oswego Health recognized its many dedicated volunteers and auxiliary members at a luncheon held during National Volunteer Week.

The health system is fortunate to have nearly 100 volunteers and auxiliary members who devote their time helping to ensure exceptional healthcare is available locally.

At the luncheon, the volunteers were given a small gift in appreciation of their service and Oswego Health President and Chief Executive Officer Ann C. Gilpin showed a video illustrating how completing a small task can lead to big things.

At the luncheon, several members were also recognized for their many years of service.

Residents interested in volunteering at Oswego Health can call Sarah Weigelt at 349-5788.

Business plans bucket list contest

Let’s Run Amok, a new company based out of Oswego, is holding a competition aimed at fulfilling someone’s bucket list request.

People interested in the contest should email their bucket list wish to danrunsamoke@gmail.com

On Sunday, April 27,  Dan Guilliams, owner of Let’s Run Amok, will chose one lucky winner and help make that person’s wish come true.

“For as long as I can remember I have wanted to help empower people to do something they have always wanted to do,” said Dan Guilliams, owner of Let’s Run Amok.

“I am excited to finally have the chance to help someone complete an item from their bucket list!” he said.

The winner of the contest will be announced on Let’s Run Amok’s twitter at 4 p.m. Sunday, April 27.

Follow @LetsRunAmok to see which individual’s wish was chosen.

If interested in entering this competition, please include your name and age in the email with your wish.

All bucket list wishes are welcome.

For more information contact Denise DiRienzo,  312-2022.

BOCES student project passes taste test

Sam Hollis, a Fulton student in the Oswego County BOCES Project Explore program, takes a bite of a pancake covered in maple syrup during a recent pancake breakfast. The breakfast was the culmination of a 10-week tree-tapping project and offered students the chance to enjoy the fruits of their labor.
Sam Hollis, a Fulton student in the Oswego County BOCES Project Explore program, takes a bite of a pancake covered in maple syrup during a recent pancake breakfast. The breakfast was the culmination of a 10-week tree-tapping project and offered students the chance to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Students enrolled in the Oswego County BOCES Project Explore program recently concluded a 10-week tree-tapping venture that generated more than 1,000 gallons of maple syrup.

The project was spearheaded by teacher KC Jones and walked students through the entire syrup-making process – from finding suitable trees for tapping to bottling the finished product. The learning experience proved to be a sweet one for the students, who enjoyed the fruits of their labor during a pancake breakfast in mid-April.

“I was so surprised at how good it tasted,” said student Sam Hollis (Fulton) as he took a bite of a pancake saturated with maple syrup. “We worked on this for a while and it came out really good.”

Jones said Project Explore students will receive a bottle of maple syrup and additional bottles will be available for faculty and staff to purchase on campus.

Oswego schools art show today

The Oswego City School District Festival of the Arts will be held from noon to 4 p.m. this Saturday (April 26) in the Oswego High School Cafeteria. Music and art from all grade levels will be on available for listening and viewing pleasure. There will be a variety of make-and-take activities for students and light refreshments will be available. Posing with some of their creations are middle school students (front row left to right) Nick Holland, Vlad Volkov and Katherine Hill while in back are Kyle Dodge, Noah Brancato, Cierra Asencio and Calvin Verny-Rasmussen.
The Oswego City School District Festival of the Arts will be held from noon to 4 p.m. this Saturday (April 26) in the Oswego High School Cafeteria. Music and art from all grade levels will be on available for listening and viewing pleasure. There will be a variety of make-and-take activities for students and light refreshments will be available. Posing with some of their creations are middle school students (front row left to right) Nick Holland, Vlad Volkov and Katherine Hill while in back are Kyle Dodge, Noah Brancato, Cierra Asencio and Calvin Verny-Rasmussen.

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