Hannibal baseball begins season with 4 losses

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal varsity baseball is 0-4 to begin the season, losing doubleheaders to Mexico and Phoenix.

On April 12, Mexico held off the Warriors, 10-7 in Game 1 of their doubleheader. In Game 2, Mexico prevailed with an 11-8 win.

Phoenix rolled past the Warriors, 19-2 in Game 1 of their April 17 doubleheader. In Game 2, Phoenix blanked Hannibal, 7-0.

Mexico escaped with a hard fought win over the Warriors in Game 1 of their  doubleheader.  After an evenly played first inning, the game was tied at 1.

However, Hannibal pulled ahead during the next 2 innings, outscoring Mexico 4-2 during the second and third innings to take a 5-3 lead.

Then Mexico erupted took in the fourth inning, scoring 5 runs to pull ahead. Hannibal had no answers down the stretch as Mexico held on for the 10-7 win.

Mexico was led by Jake Gorton with a hit and 3 RBIs, followed by Justin Marden with a hit and 2 RBIs, Anthony Moretti with a hit and an RBI and Brian Dufrane, Tanner Stevens, Tyler Stever and Dante Turo combined for a hit and 4 RBI.

Tyler Stever earned the win for Mexico on the mound. He allowed a run off of 2 hits in an inning of work. Following Stever was Justin Marsden who allowed 6 runs off 3 hits in 3 innings of work. Caleb Wallis is credited with the save for Mexico.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Colton Cannova and Austin Mattison, with 2 hits and an RBI each. They were followed by Shane Sweeting with a hit and an RBI and Greg Hadcock with an RBI.

On the mound, Colton Cannova started the game for Hannibal, throwing 2 strikeouts while allowing 3 runs off 4 hits in 2 and 2/3 innings of work.

Following Cannova was Jorge Padau who threw a strikeout while allowing 7 runs off 2 hits in 1 and 2/3 innings pitched. Taber Carter finished the game for Hannibal on the mound.

In Game 2, Mexico scored a couple of late runs to seal the win over the Warriors.

Early on, it seemed as if Mexico would roll — after 4 innings of play, Mexico had a 7-1 lead.

However, the Warriors battled back during the next 2 innings. They outscored Mexico, 7-2 during the fifth and sixth innings to come within a run at 9-8.

But they were unable to get any closer. Mexico added 2 more runs during the top of the seventh inning to cap off an 11-8 win.

Mexico was led by Anthony Moretti with 3 hits and 3 RBIs, followed by  Justin Marsden with 2 hits and 2 RBIs.

Dante Turo had a hit and 2 RBIs and  John Bouck, Tanner Stevens, Tyler Stever, Caleb Wallis and John Washer combined for 3 hits and 3 RBIs.

On the mound, Dante Turo earned the win for Mexico. In 3 and 2/3 innings of work, Turo threw 5 strikeouts while allowing only 1 run off 3 hits.

Following Turo was Anthony Moretti, who threw a strikeout while allowing 4 runs off 3 hits in 1 and 1/3 innings pitched. Tanner Stevens earned the save for Mexico, with 3 strikeouts and 3 runs off of 3 hits in 2 innings work.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Sam McCraith with 3 hits and an RBI against Mexico. Following McCraith were Taber Carter, Greg Hadcock, Ethan Straub and Shane Sweeting, each with a hit and an RBI. Colton Cannova and Austin Mattison added 2 hits.

Austin Mattison started the game on the mound and in 3 and 1/3 innings of work, Mattison threw 4 strikeouts while allowing 7 runs off 5 hits.

Following Mattison was Troy Landis who threw 2 strikeouts while allowing 4 runs off 4 hits in 3 innings pitched. Jorge Padau is credited with throwing a strikeout while allowing only a hit in 2/3 of an inning.

After falling to Phoenix 19-2 in Game 1 of their doubleheader, the Warriors suffered the same fate in Game 2.

In Game 2, Phoenix stifled the Warriors early and often. The Firebirds jumped out to a 2-0 lead during the first inning and then Phoenix put the game out of reach during the next 2 innings. The Firebirds scored 5 more runs during the second and third innings en route to the 7-0 win.

Phoenix was led by Jordan Jock with 2 hits and an RBI, followed by Emilio Tassone with a hit and 2 RBIs. Bryce Plante and Zach Schlacter had a hit and an RBI each and Dylan Borza chipped in a hit.

On the mound, Jordan Jock earned the win for the Firebirds. In 6 innings pitched, Jock threw 5 strikeouts while allowing just 1 hit.

Bryce Plante earned the save for Phoenix, throwing a strikeout and allowing only 1 hit in 1 inning of work.

Leading the way for Hannibal were Jon Combes and Austin Mattison with 1 hit each. Austin Mattison pitched the entire game for the Warriors, throwing 6 strikeouts while allowing 7 runs off only 3 hits.

The Sportsman’s World — Adventures in the Marsh

By Leon Archer

Sweet thing and I have started packing for our long drive back home, but we won’t be leaving for a few more days.

It will seem strange when we leave and don’t have our grandson, Beckett, keeping us busy anymore. He just had his first birthday, but boy can he give his grampa a run for the money.

Yesterday I had him out in the back yard. It was about 70 degrees and the sun was shining, and it was way too nice to stay inside. Beckett hasn’t quite gotten used to grass, but he still likes being outside, mostly on the patio.

I had been doing some work in the flower garden and had laid my little hand spade down before Beckett joined me. He is very inquisitive, so he was investigating all the nooks and crannies around the patio while I lounged for a few minutes on the big swing.

I figured he couldn’t get into too much trouble on the patio, but the next thing I knew he had the spade in his mouth. By the time I caught up with him, he was spitting and gagging a little, but the spade seemed to be OK.

Apparently good black dirt isn’t immediately fatal as Beckett seems pretty lively today. My mother always used to say, “You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die.” Beckett’s off to a good start.

I’ve been keeping track of what the fishing has been like back in New York state, and I am ready to be back there.

The bullheads are biting and perch have been showing up. The smelt haven’t started running in the Niagara River yet, probably because the water is still too cold.

It shouldn’t be long though, because the guys fishing on the lake where the river empties out onto the Niagara Bar have noticed smelt in the trout stomachs.

This is the time of year when my father would announce that he was going to pick a bunch of cowslips for dinner. I couldn’t stand cowslips (more properly known as marsh marigolds) but my father actually looked forward to them.

If you read about them, you will find out they are poisonous, but when prepared properly, they are edible. I use the word “edible” advisably and in its broadest sense. Anyone who watches the TV show Bizarre Foods will understand.

The thing I liked about cowslips wasn’t eating them, it was going after them. They grew in the marsh, and the only time to pick them, according to my father, was in the early spring when the new leaves were about the size of a half dollar and they hadn’t blossomed out with their bright yellow flowers.

Dad would say to me, “Get your hip boots, we are going after cowslips.” I didn’t complain; I hopped to it, and was ready to head out before he was.

We would walk up East Main Street, past Charlie Beldock’s barn, and in no time we were in the marsh that bordered his farm.

Once we were in the marsh, I was in a wonderland and I had precious little time for actually picking cowslips. We both carried a large paper grocery bag to put the round leaves in; dad’s was always full when we left the marsh, and mine was, shall we say, easy to carry.

It was an adventure to walk in the marsh, and there was so much to see, so picking marsh marigolds was not my top priority.

This particular marsh was home to many muskrats and their houses were sources of great interest to me. Sometimes I would catch site of a muskrat sitting on a feeding mound, munching away on a cat tail root or see one swimming along the surface before plunging into an underwater run.

There were areas of water – of course – and I watched for the big, dark purplish, yellow spotted spring salamanders that gathered to breed in them. They were easy to catch, but I just looked them over and put them back.

Overhead the male snipe and woodcock were swooping down towards the marsh and then climbing back up almost out of sight before diving again over and over, and over again.

The quavering sound of the wind on their wings and the diving display was all for the attention of demure females watching from the ground. The woodcock also vocalized as they dove.

I once had a woodcock that had been displaying high above me, come plunging down to land on a small hummock about 10 feet away from me. I can still see his huge brown eyes inspecting me, before he decided I wasn’t a threat.

Then I caught a slight movement about three feet from where he had come to rest. The first thing I saw was another set of huge brown eyes, and then the brown body of the hen took shape. She had been perfectly camouflaged against the brown background of the hummock.

We had silently watched the show together, and I’m pretty sure she was just as appreciative as I had been.

I usually picked a bouquet of pussy willows for my mother before we left the marsh. They would grace the table in our home for a few days.

Several kinds of frogs abounded in the marsh. Most of them I could find if they were singing, but I never could locate peepers that I heard – very frustrating.

I’ve never lost my appreciation for the marsh. The sights and sounds enthrall me as much today as they did when I picked cowslips with my father.

Oh, by the way. Marsh Marigolds are edible when prepared properly. They must be boiled at least twice, three times is better, emptying out the water each time and putting them into fresh to boil.

This apparently leaches out whatever the toxin is and makes them less acrid and bitter.

My mother always sautéed the greens with some bacon or salt pork after their last boiling. Over the years, I got so I could eat them, but now I only think about it.

On the other hand, I bet they would make great beans and greens. I might have to hit the marsh again to find out – maybe.

Arts Fest registration open now

Vendors prepare for the crowds at CNY Arts Center Arts Fest. Registrations are now open for Arts Fest 2014 to be held June 14 from 10am to 3 pm. Register online at CNYArtsCenter.com or call 592-3373 for more information.
Vendors prepare for the crowds at CNY Arts Center Arts Fest. Registrations are now open for Arts Fest 2014 to be held June 14 from 10am to 3 pm. Register online at CNYArtsCenter.com or call 592-3373 for more information.

CNY Arts Center officials say vendors can now register for the fourth annual Arts Fest set for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 14 at the Fulton Community Center Ice Rink on Broadway in Fulton.

The event brings artists and crafters together with handmade original art on display for sale along with food vendors, and hands on art.

New at this year’s event will be art demonstrations and sample art classes for all ages along with new outdoor entertainment.

The annual CNY Arts Center community mural will also be completed at this year’s Arts Fest. Previous murals have been created during Harborfest.

The 2014 mural will use recycled bottle caps to create an Alice in Wonderland theme. Festival attendees will help create the mural to be framed and displayed in a prominent Fulton location.

Vendors can register for a 10×10 spot with electricity at the festival. Food vendors are also actively sought.

For online registration and more information  visit www.CNYArtsCenter.com or call 592-3373.

Parish author to speak at Arts Center

The CNY Arts Center will feature author Tracy Kinne at its next Author Spotlight at 6:30 p.m. May 1 at the Arts in the HeART Gallery, 47 S. First St., Fulton.

The program highlights local authors and their recently published work. Kinne, a lifelong resident of Parish, was a newspaper journalist for 21 years before taking a buyout and leaving The Post-Standard in 2007.

She also was former editor at several smaller newspapers, including the Phoenix Register and the Valley News.

Kinne is the author of two books. Her first is a memoir about her four years as a low-wage retail worker. Kinne was named a 2013 Central New York Workers Memorial Day Champion of Worker Safety and Health for this memoir, “On Sale: Employers Get Good Workers Dirt Cheap.”

The book also took honorable mention in three international festivals: Paris, New York and New England.

Her second book is young adult fiction, “Little Town on the Shale: A Girl Fights Hydrofracking,” describes the challenges faced by a teen who is an emerging activist but lives in rural poverty much like that in parts of Oswego County.

“I wanted people to understand the growing poverty and economic inequality on a personal level,” Kinne said.

During the program, Kinne will explain how she wrote her books, read excerpts from them and take questions from the audience.

Afterward, attendants can purchase a signed copy of their books, with all proceeds to benefit the Arts Center. Refreshments will be served. There is no cost to attend the program.

For more information about the event, call the CNY Arts Center at 592-3373 or visit http://www.cnyartscenter.com.

Undergrads exhibit works of art

Legend lives -- Joel Dodge, a SUNY Oswego candidate for a bachelor of fine arts degree, touches up a print of Frankenstein’s monster for his part in the college’s Bachelor of Fine Arts exhibition, opening at 5 p.m. Friday, May 2, with a free public reception in Tyler Art Gallery.
Legend lives — Joel Dodge, a SUNY Oswego candidate for a bachelor of fine arts degree, touches up a print of Frankenstein’s monster for his part in the college’s Bachelor of Fine Arts exhibition, opening at 5 p.m. Friday, May 2, with a free public reception in Tyler Art Gallery.

SUNY Oswego’s spring Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts exhibitions will open Friday, May 2, with a free public reception from 5 to 7 p.m. in Tyler Art Gallery.

The reception in Tyler Hall for the students eligible for BFA degrees at Commencement will coincide with pre-exhibition festivities for students displaying works in the BA exhibition in the gallery. The shows will run through May 17.

The BFA candidates include Leonard Abramovich of Potsdam, Timothy Ano of Sherrill, Amanda Blakley of Bridgeport, Lauren Calabrese of Latham, Brittany Cook of Phoenix, Joel Dodge of Fulton, Kyle Gilyard of Endicott, Sarah Harbacz of Cohoes, Travis Harrison of Queens Village, Rebecca Hess of Altmar, KimberlyKittleson of Liverpool, Pauline Lam of Ballston Spa Shawn        Lockwood of Mohawk, Katelyn Luce of Central Square and Nicole McElroy of Latham.

Also participating are Katherine Morelli of Nanuet, Stephanie Peck of Jordan, Gianna Putrino of Endicott, Elizabeth Raymonda of Syracuse, Caitlin Roberts of Queensbury, Morgan Rook of Lowville. Clare Salisbury-Ruf of Liverpool, Megan Stachnick of Queensbury, Danielle White of Baldwinsville, Emily Wild of Rochester and Zachary Zaremba of Watertown.

Bachelor of arts candidates are eligible to display their artwork in the non-required BA Exhibition. BA students pursue multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary studies in psychology, communications, marketing and other majors, in addition to art. BFA students participate in SUNY Oswego’s demanding and focused programs in studio art or graphic design.

Tyler Art Galley is open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free, with donations appreciated. Parking at SUNY Oswego is by permit only; for more information about guest parking, visit www.oswego.edu/administration/parking.

For more information about fine arts presentations, call 315-312-2112 or visit www.oswego.edu/arts.

CNY Arts Center seeks vet tributes

CNY Arts Center wants your help to express gratitude to veterans and service personnel everywhere through pictures, letters, poems and live talent onstage when they host local talent for the 33rd annual Memorial Day Salute from 2 to 3:30 p.m. May 24.

In addition to featured Young Performers who have been working with CNY Arts Center throughout the school year, the organization is inviting local talent to share the stage with their own salute to veterans and military personnel.

“Do you have a message you’d like to send to the troops and veterans being honored? This year’s theme ‘Showing Gratitude to our veterans’ is a perfect opportunity to show your appreciation in song, story, music, dance, or whatever your family-friendly talent is,” said Nancy Fox, director.

“We invite everyone from the youngest to the oldest to send a message of thanks,” she said. “We hope to draw talent in multiple categories whether it is dance, vocals, musicians, or storytelling.”

“We know there is a lot of talent and many wonderful performing artists. Memorial Day Salute is a popular tradition for local families and here is a way to be directly involved as we show our gratitude to veterans and share your talent with your hometown family and friends,” Fox said.

Participants interested in performing should contact Nancy Fox directly at 592-3373. Time slots are few and limited to 3 minutes per act.

The organization will also accept art work, poems, and written tributes of thanks to be shared throughout the talent show between acts.

Items collected will be donated to a veterans’ organization after the event.

Art work will be accepted at Arts in the HeART Gallery, 47 S. First St in Fulton. Messages or written tributes should be mailed to CNY Arts Center, P. O Box 477, Fulton NY 13069.

Marine Museum presents ‘movie night’

To kick off the celebration of the 80th anniversary of Oswego West Pierhead Lighthouse, the H. Lee White Maritime Museum and the Oswego Film Group are presenting the movie, “Lightkeepers”, at the Beacon Hotel at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1.

“Lightkeepers” was filmed at Race Point Lighthouse in Cape Cod, Mass. The Race Point Light was built in 1817 and has a long history of serving the maritime community.

The movie was filmed in 2009 and stars Richard Dreyfuss, Blythe Danner and Bruce Dern. “Lightkeepers” is a romantic comedy about a curmudgeon lighthouse keeper, who has sworn off women.

The movie is set in 1912. Some of the artifacts utilized in the movie belonged to Oswego resident Ted Panayotoff from when he lived in Maine with his wife Jo.

The Chatham Lighthouse of Massachusetts also loaned objects to the film project.

The movie will be shown at the Beacon Hotel, 75 W. Bridge St., Oswego.

There are only 50 tickets available, therefore seating is on a first-come-first-serve basis. You must have a ticket to view the movie.

Tickets can be picked up at two locations in Oswego: H. Lee White Marine Museum, located at the end of the West First Street Pier and river’s end bookstore, located at 19 West Bridge Street.

Popcorn is provided courtesy of Zurich Cinemas of Oswego and soda will also be available.

Donations for the Oswego West Pierhead Lighthouse Restoration project are encouraged.

Fulton dance center competes

Some of the members of Off Broadway Dance Center in Fulton pose at the Syracuse competition. They are, left to right, Samantha Cooper, Alyssa Wicks, Kayla Frost, Arianna Schmeer, Mackenzie Loughrey, Mary Jane Mullaney and Mckenzie Emmons.
Some of the members of Off Broadway Dance Center in Fulton pose at the Syracuse competition. They are, left to right, Samantha Cooper, Alyssa Wicks, Kayla Frost, Arianna Schmeer, Mackenzie Loughrey, Mary Jane Mullaney and Mckenzie Emmons.

Thirty Off Broadway Dance Center students competed in the Shining Star Division at the Power of Dance competition at the OnCenter in Syracuse  April 5 and 6.

Four members of the Off Broadway Dance Center competitors shows off their trophies. They are, from left, Devon Ruckdeschel, Mattie Burdick, Elizabeth Crockford and Genesis Loetterle. Both photos by Teri Loetterle
Four members of the Off Broadway Dance Center competitors shows off their trophies. They are, from left, Devon Ruckdeschel, Mattie Burdick, Elizabeth Crockford and Genesis Loetterle.
Both photos by Teri Loetterle

Results were:

  • Mattie Burdick, Senior Solo, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • Genesis Loetterle, Senior Solo, 2nd Place, Ruby Status
  • Lizzie Russell, Tween Solo, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • Megan Johnson, Tween Solo, 2nd Place, Ruby Status
  • Jaidyn Perry, Junior Solo, 3rd Place
  • Talia Trombino, Petite Solo, 3rd Place, Ruby Status
  • Grady Marshall, Petite Solo, 2nd Place, Ruby Status
  • Bailey & Jaidyn Perry, Tween Duo/Trio, 3rd Place, Emerald Status
  • Makaylee Schmeer, Taylor Bonoffski, Megan Johnson, Tween Duo/Trio, 2nd Place, Ruby Status
  • Mackenzie Hayden and Lizzie Russell, Tween Duo/Trio, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • Janna Moody, Olivia Metcalf and Jaidyn Perry, Junior Duo/Trio, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • Talia Trombino and Grady Marshall, Petite Duo/Trio, 2nd Place, Ruby Status
  • Anthony Ferguson and Grady Marshall, Petite Duo/Trio, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • Korbin Cooper and Grace Gilles, Super Petite Duo/Trio, 1st Place, Emerald Status
  • “Neon Lights”, Senior Small Group, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • “The Waitresses”, Senior Duo/Trio, 1st Place, Ruby Status
  • “This Is My Dance Floor”, Petite Small Group, 6th Place, 1st in Jazz Petite Small Groups, Ruby Status
  • “Where’s The Party”, Petite Small Group, 9th Place, 3rd in Jazz Petite Small Groups, Emerald Status

The director or Off Broadway Dance Center is Ellen Russell Marshall. The OBDC Competition Team will take part in two more national competitions this season and one regional competition.

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