Sign up Saturday for Fulton Kiwanis baseball

Fulton Kiwanis baseball will be holding sign-ups for the 2014 season from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday May 3 at the War Memorial.

Director Derek Lyons said Kiwanis baseball will be heading in a new direction this season. Lyons and his group of supporters will be striving to turn its Kiwanis baseball and softball programs into more of a learning experience.

Fulton varsity baseball and softball coaches will be used to help players learn the proper mechanics and throwing, catching, fielding and batting techniques. Lyons said games will still be held, but the program will focus more on skills development.

The 2014 Kiwanis baseball season will begin the week of June 30 and end the week of Aug. 4.

Participants can expect activities two nights a week, including a practice session of station work with varsity and junior varsity coaches.

Games will be played following the practice sessions and on another night of the week as well.

This season, Kiwanis will feature five different leagues. The T-Ball League (eligible to boys and girls ages 4-6), the Grasshopper Minor League (Coaches and Umpires pitch in this league which is eligible to boys ages 7-9) and the Grasshopper Major League (eligible for boys ages 10-12).

Girls softball will have two leagues as part of the Kiwanis baseball program once again this season. In the Minors, coaches and umpires pitch in this league to girls ages 7-9.

Girls ages 10-12 are eligible to participate in the Major League. In terms of participation eligibility, the ages indicated are based on how old a player is on June 24.

Fulton clean up day set for May 3

Members of the Fulton Project Bloom Committee receive the Mayberry Day Proclamation from Mayor Ronald Woodward Sr. Left to right are Barry Ostrander, Fulton parks and recreation director; Diane Burnell, RealtyUSA; Sandra Farrands, RealtyUSA, Project Bloom co-chair and chamber board; Woodward, and Jan Rebeor, volunteer.
Members of the Fulton Project Bloom Committee receive the Mayberry Day Proclamation from Mayor Ronald Woodward Sr. Left to right are Barry Ostrander, Fulton parks and recreation director; Diane Burnell, RealtyUSA; Sandra Farrands, RealtyUSA, Project Bloom co-chair and chamber board; Woodward, and Jan Rebeor, volunteer.

Fulton Mayor Ronald Woodward met recently with the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce’s Fulton Project Bloom committee to proclaim Saturday, May 3, 2014 Mayberry Day in the City of Fulton.

Mayberry Day is a beautification project to clean up sand, salt and debris in the city after a long winter. Local businesses as well as organizations, student groups and private citizens have all participated in this clean up.

Groups or individuals interested in participating should call Joann at the Fulton Department of Parks and Recreation at 598-3593 to “register” themselves or their group. They will be assigned an area to work or you may request an area.

This signup helps ensure that all areas needing assistance will be attended to, plus it will provide a meeting spot for clean up and supplies.

Clean up begins at 8 a.m., Saturday, May 3 and ends at about noon. A representative from each team can pick up supplies at the Chamber office at 12 Canalview Mall starting at 7:30 a.m.

Trash bags will be supplied, with a limited number of safety vests and gloves available. Gloves and brightly colored clothing are recommended.

More information is available by contacting the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce at 343-7681 and online at www.oswegofultonchamber.com

 

News in Brief

The Palermo United Methodist Church will host its chicken and biscuit dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1  in the church dining room.

This is a family-style, all-you-can-eat dinner including chicken and gravy, biscuits, mashed potatoes, salad, vegetable, dessert and beverage.

Takeouts are available and can be reserved by calling 598-4888

The church is located on County Route 35 just off of State Route 3 in Palermo, just north of Palermo Center.

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The Amboy 4-H Environmental Education Center will present a public program about the American woodcock at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 1, (rain date May 2).

American woodcock advertise courtship intentions by strutting about and emitting a series of nasal peents. With a final “peent,” the male launches into an enthralling flight display to attract hens.

Following a short presentation of woodcock natural history with Pat Carney, facility’s naturalist, attendees will venture to a singing ground to observe and listen to the serenade of this twilight troubadour.

Other spring heralds also will regale us with evening ballads. Program participants should dress for an evening spring walk by wearing jackets, boots and shoes that can get wet and/or muddy.

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Assemblyman Will Barclay will host an American Red Cross blood drive from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, May 2 at Believer’s Chapel in Fulton.

Anyone is welcome to donate. To schedule an appointment for the May 2 blood drive in Fulton, call the Red Cross at 343-0967 or sign up online, visit http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood and click on “Schedule an Appointment.”

It takes about 8-10 minutes to give blood with a total time to register and replenish with provided snacks of about an hour and 15 minutes. Donors are encouraged to eat well and hydrate prior to appointment.

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An immigrant farmworker who works on an Upstate dairy and an organizer for a local workers’ center will speak at noon Sunday, May 4 at First Universalist Society of Central Square as part of a statewide speaking tour aimed at improving the lives of immigrant farmworkers.

The talk and a brief slideshow will be given by Jose Canas, who is originally from El Salvador, and Rebecca Fuentes, of West Monroe, who is lead organizer for the Syracuse-based Workers’ Center of Central New York.

Canas works at a dairy in Northern New York. Fuentes is the daughter of a farmworker from Mexico.

The program also is part of the Voices for Worker Equality speaker and film series organized by the church, state Route 49 just west of U.S. Route 11, and the workers’ center.

The statewide campaign will include several other dairy farmworkers and is being organized by the workers’ center along with Worker Justice Center of New York, in Rochester.

It coincides with Worker Memorial Day on April 25, May Day on May 1 and Farmworker Advocacy Day on May 5.

The local talk is free, but donations will be accepted to support the workers’ center. Light refreshments will be served.

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Girls and boys ages 12-15 are invited to the Montezuma Audubon Center for up to three weeks of Sportsman Education this summer.

Young hunters will get their hunter safety, bow safety and waterfowl identification certificates in three weeks of hands-on learning and outdoor experiences.

The camps will run from July 14 through 31 (Monday-Thursday for each course).

Each week will feature classroom-style learning, covering the basics of each course, enhanced by hands-on outdoor field lessons including orienteering, canoeing, tracking and more.

Participants will also take part in conservation projects that enhance habitats for game and non-game species.

Fee per camper: $100 for one week, $190 for two and $270 for all three. Major support for this program is provided by Bass Pro Shops.

Space is limited and registration is required. Registration forms can be found at http://ny.audubon.org/montezuma. For more information, call 365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.

Camp schedule:

Week 1 – Hunter Safety – July 14-17

Week 2 – Bow Safety – July 21-24

Week 3 – Waterfowl ID – July 28-July 31

For more information about the Sportsman Camp or the Montezuma Audubon Center, visit http://ny.audubon.org/montezuma.

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The First Congregational Church of New Haven is holding an eat-in or take-out dinner from noon until gone Saturday, May 3.

Preorders are available to be picked up between noon and 2 p.m.

The dinner will contain ½ chicken, pulled pork, pasta salad, salt potatoes, roll and butter. Call 963-3118 and leave a message with your name, phone number and the number of dinners you want. You will receive a call back to confirm your order and to make arrangements for you to buy the tickets needed for your dinner(s).

The church is located at 4250 State Route 104 in New Haven. The church is just west of County Route 6.

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The youth group at St. Stephen’s Catholic Church in Phoenix is having a garage sale May 17.

The youth group is asking if people would donate bottles and cans for the sale.  The youths are raising money for a trip to Steubenville, Ohio for a youth rally with about 40,000 other teens. The event, at the Franciscan Univerity of Steubenville, is focused on connecting teens to the sacraments. There is live music by Bob Rice, speakers and Masses.

There is going to be a drop off area on the day of the garage sale in the parking lot behind St. Stephen’s Church. There is also a drop off spot right next to the church if people would like to drop off before or after the garage sale.

Those dropping off should tell the bottle and can business they are dropping off for Team Awesomess of St. Stephen’s church.

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The Oswego County Health Department will hold a rabies clinic for cats, dogs and pet ferrets from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 7, at the Oswego County Highway Garage, 957 Centerville Road, Pulaski.

State law requires that all cats, dogs and pet ferrets be vaccinated against rabies. The first rabies vaccine should be given at three months of age.

A second vaccination is required for cats and dogs within one year of the first, and every three years thereafter. Ferrets need to be vaccinated annually.

In order for pets to receive the 3-year booster shot, owners need to show that the pet was previously vaccinated and should bring their pet’s last rabies vaccination certificate to the clinic.

Trio to enter Fulton Bowling Hall of Fame

By Rob Tetro

Christine Hawksby, Doug Wallace and Dean Distin will be inducted into the Fulton Bowling Hall of Fame during a ceremony Sunday at RFH’s Hideaway outside Phoenix.

Hawksby began bowling at 13 when she joined the Junior League of the Sealright Recreation Club. She said when she first started bowling, the Sealright Recreation Club had pin setters at that time.

After competing in many Junior League tournaments, Hawksby went on to bowl throughout high school and finished in second place of the Senior Division. She bowled in numerous women’s leagues including the Whirley Bird, Tip Top, Friendly Girls, Lucky Seven, the Monday Night Women’s Classic and the Friday Night Mixed League at the Sealright Recreation Club.

For many years, Hawksby served as president of the Whirley Bird League. She has had the good fortune of bowling with many friends in local, state and national bowling tournaments. Hawksby was also an annual participant in the Elks Club New York State Tournament.

Since 1977, Hawksby has been a member of the Lock “600” Club. She took part in the Fulton Association Tournament in 1978. With a score of 1872, Hawksby earned a first place finish in the All Events category.

She bowled a 674 series with scores of 214, 226 and 234 while bowling in the Friendly Girls League in 1978. At the time, her series was the highest in Oswego County. Her highest single game was a 269 which occurred while bowling in the Tip Top League.

Hawksby won first place in the Fulton Women’s Bowling Association Tournament with a score of 1216 alongside Dot Morrison in 1982. With a 171 average, she earned the High Average Award in the Lucky Seven League during the 1983-84 season.

During the 1999-2000 season, Hawksby’s team won the Lucky Seven League. Over the years, she also has earned All Spare Game, Triple Score of 190, 200 and 250 game patches and for two consecutive years, her teams won the Budweiser No Tap Tournament.

For more than 25 years, Hawksby worked at Birdseye Food, Inc. before its closing in December 2012. Unfortunately, a knee injury and other health problems left her unable to bowl for the first time in many years. Hawksby keeps busy through involvement with the Fulton Elks Club, VFW Post 569, Fulton Moose Club #1280 and the Polish Home. Hawksby said her involvement with these organizations is something she wouldn’t trade for anything.

Doug Wallace began bowling when he was 17 years old. Bowling found its way into his life when he saw a few of his friends taking part in the sport.

He said he tried bowling and it clicked. Before he knew it, he was bowling in a league. Wallace went on to bowl in at least one league every year since then.

Wallace’s most notable earlier achievement came in 1982 when he bowled his first 300 game. During the game prior to his first 300 game, Wallace set the foundation for perfection by bowling 8 straight strikes to end the game.

Early on, he also shot an 806 series at a recreation club in Syracuse. Wallace said bowling well in that kind of environment is not easy to do. He considers that achievement to be one of his biggest.

In recent years, Wallace won the Western Central Bowling Association Tournament. He was also recognized for his success competing in Doubles Play.

It means a lot to Wallace to be inducted into the Fulton Bowling Hall of Fame. He is familiar with and has a lot of respect for many Hall of Fame members including fellow inductee, Dean Distin. At the end of the day, it’s an honor for Wallace to be associated with other impressive bowlers and their numerous accomplishments within the sport.

Distin began bowling in 1978 when he joined the Junior Bowling Program at Lakeview Lanes. Distin found himself interested in the sport when he would see his father, Milton Distin, bowl in both of Fulton’s classic leagues.

Some of Distin’s early accomplishments in bowling include being a captain of the high school varsity team for two of his three years of participation. During his senior year, Distin had the highest average in the league en route to winning the Onondaga High School League. He has bowled 52 300 games with 31 800 series and has won many city tournament titles.

His experience in bowling has also included holding many league related positions. Distin served as president of the W.F. Case League and also served as director and vice president of the Fulton Bowling Association.

More recently, Distin won the 1988 and 1989 Oswego County Masters Championship. In 1991, he won the New York State Singles Championship.

Distin has been on several successful teams as well. In 1994, he earned recognition in the National Doubles and earned Team All Events acknowledgements at The ABC Open Championship. Distin won the 1995 Van-Wie Doubles Championship. After being the runner up in the Syracuse Masters Championship in 1993, he went on to win the tournament in 2000.

Distin has been married to his wife Kathy for 24 years and they have three children — sons Thomas, 17, Andrew, 15 and daughter Katie, 12.  For 20 years, Distin has been the owner of Jafco Construction.

Distin said being inducted into the Hall of Fame is an honor that allows him to come full circle. Not only are many of Distin’s friends and teammates members of the Hall of Fame, but his father is as well. Soon, he will be able to share this most impressive of achievements with the person who inspired him to bowl.

Youth group wants to save children from slavery

The Cabin 3 Youth group of Gods Vision Christian Church in Hannibal and the Vintage Truth college age ministry held a 30-hour famine on Good Friday, April 18 in Hannibal to raise money and awareness for Agape International and World Vision Child sponsorship.

Many youth and adults stopped eating at 6 p.m. Thursday April 17 and did not eat again for 30 hours.

During this time the youth built cardboard houses to sleep in overnight. The youth also held a car wash and obtained sponsors to raise money for the charities.

Mission worker Jill Chatham from the Rochester area came to speak to the youth and share information about worldwide child slavery and trafficking.

Every country has some sort of child trafficking and every area of the United States also has child slavery and trafficking issues.

Chatham taught the youth about the reasons why youth get involved in slavery, why they get sold into slavery in poor countries and how American teens get lured into a lifestyle that is actually leading them and trapping them into slavery and trafficking.

Many countries have youth as young as six years old working 21 hours a day, peeling shrimp, sewing soccer balls and working as prostitutes.

Chatham also pointed out the many products that we as Americans use on a daily basis that most likely was grown by, prepared by or assembled by children, many slaves, many not able to return to their families.

Statistically one child is sold into slavery every 30 seconds and 35 percent are less than age 16. Officials estimate there are more than 27,000 slaves worldwide, half under the age of 18.

Agape International says they are ”fighting the ground war on sex trafficking in Cambodia. Our projects prevent, rescue, restore and reintegrate, impacting 10,000+ people a year.”

But Agape said this takes money and  that’s where groups like Cabin 3 come in. Every dollar given helps to change a life, restore a life.

This is the 10th year Cabin 3 has done a 30-hour famine, raising money for their sponsored child, “Ruth,” a little girl in Peru, as well as raising money for World Vision.

This is the third year Cabin 3 and Vintage Truth College group have raised money for Agape International.

The youth traveled to Buffalo, Tuesday April 29 to deliver the money they raised to Vintage at the Chapel at Cross point in Buffalo.

Anyone who would like to donate to either fund, or if you would like more information, call Erik at 564-6133 or go to www.cabin3ministries.org.

All area teens ages 10-18 are welcome to attend all Cabin 3 events and all older teens, college age and adults are welcome to come to Vintage Truth every Tuesday  at 8 p.m. at God’s Vision Christian Church at 326 Church St., Hannibal.

Birdlebough students earn presidential honors

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

With a dedication to community service and a focus on helping others, 19 Phoenix youth earned recognition during a ceremony at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5540 on Thursday night April 24.

Local dignitaries, school administrators and community representatives were on hand to commend the students for their dedication and volunteer service as part of the 18th annual President’s Youth Volunteer Service Award dinner.

“It’s an honor to be in the room with you,” said Brian Chetney, executive director of the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau. “This is a recognition program that honors tens of millions Americans who have made a commitment to sustained service … and you have all done your part.”

“Sustained” was the key word, as the honorees have devoted much of their free time to serving others. The juniors and seniors who received the silver distinction accumulated at least 300 volunteer hours,  while the gold recipients tallied at least 500 hours.

For John C. Birdlebough High School students Meganne Murphy and Dylan Switzer, who each earned the Youth of the Year Award, volunteer service has been a way of life.

“I started in first grade as a Boy Scout,” said Switzer, who earned his Eagle Scout badge in October. “I remember helping out at the shows for winter guard because my sister was in it. Volunteering is something I enjoy.”

Murphy began her community service contributions almost a decade ago.

“I’ve been volunteering since fifth grade, I started out as a Bridge House Brat,” she said. “It makes me feel good that I can make a difference.”

Although that positive feeling is enough to satisfy Murphy and Switzer, the additional recognition Thursday night was equally satisfying and humbling, they said.

“I was really surprised because I didn’t expect to get anything from being so involved,” Murphy said. “It means a lot to me to know that I’ve made a difference in the community.”

Switzer echoed those sentiments.

“It’s a big honor,” he said. “Honestly, I don’t know how the selection committee made the decision. There are other people who were just as deserving as me.”

Birdlebough Principal Greg Molloy spoke about the Youth of the Year recipients and the qualities that contributed to them receiving the distinction.

Prior to presenting them with plaques, he lauded their volunteer spirit and commended them for their commitment to the community.

In addition to the Youth of the Year Award presentation, Superintendent Judy Belfield and Phoenix Board of Education President Earl Rudy congratulated the Gold and Silver Award recipients and presented them with commemorative pins and certificates.

“Your efforts will make you a well-rounded and a better person,” Rudy told the students.

Gold Award winners were James Benthin, Ben Bulgrien, Finella Campanino, Trever Ferens, Eric Hillpot, Maria Musumeci, Matthew Pelton, Paige Recore, Brian Stafford, Shaun Turner, Ryan Thorn and Olivia Uttamsingh. Silver Award recipients were Hailee Claycomb, Gianna Garofalo, Bailey Goldthwait, Hannah Lees and Jessica Lord.

County Envirothon takes to the woods Thursday

By Ashley M. Casey

Bring your boots: rain or shine, young nature enthusiasts will be facing off tomorrow at the Oswego County Envirothon, held at Jellystone Park in Mexico.

Since 1991, the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District has sponsored the county’s Envirothon, a hands-on test of high school students’ knowledge of forestry, aquatics, soils, wildlife and current environmental issues.

The county winner goes on to the New York state competition. Last year’s county champion, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, came in 11th of 49 teams at the state Envirothon.

“(Envirothon) encourages students to be more in tune with the environment and the natural resources in the county,” said Erica Schreiner, district educator of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District and Envirothon Coordinator.

The competition consists of five 30-minute exams with 25 questions, plus a video presentation submitted prior to the event.

Teams of five students must properly identify trees, analyze soil and perform other tasks to demonstrate their environmental knowledge. Schools can send two teams of five with up to two alternates.

Local experts in each field create a new test for each subject each year. This year, the Oswego County branch of Cornell Cooperative Extension is covering the current issue of sustainable local agriculture.

Schreiner said Envirothon is an outdoorsy outlet to keep students engaged.

“It sparks their interest in something and gives them something to belong to,” she said. “It’s a great hands-on event.”

Some Envirothon participants pursue the interest after high school.

“A lot of them do go on to ESF (SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) at Syracuse and other environmental colleges,” Schreiner said.

Jamie Hefti, adviser of two Envirothon teams at Pulaski, said one of his graduating senior “stars” will study biology at Harvard University and another is headed to Clarkson University for environmental engineering.

He said the competition’s individual focus helps prepares students for college, especially the oral video presentation.

“It’s so self-directed. It’s on them,” Hefti said. “When I watched them prepare for the oral part of it, I think it’s the most truly applicable skill for preparing for college that there is in high school.”

Hefti said he has a study area in his classroom for students to visit and borrow materials when they have a free period during the day. The students each become an “expert” on one of the subjects and coach each other.

“It’s really an awesome thing to observe,” he said.

Roxane Thormann and her husband, Rich, led the APW team to a surprise victory last year. The Thormanns volunteered to coach APW’s Envirothon team after their daughter’s beloved science teacher retired. Roxane Thormann said she and her husband, who are not teachers, faced a “big learning curve” in coaching the kids in environmental science.

“We were awestruck,” Thormann said of the 2013 win, which was APW’s first Oswego County Envirothon victory. “We didn’t have any idea we had it in us. (The team was) just flabbergasted.”

Catherine Celeste and Billie Jo Peterson are the co-advisers of the environmental club at Oswego High School The club is open to students in grades seven through 12, so it provides a “feeder group” of middle schoolers preparing for the high school Envirothon team.

“I have a lot of younger kids … getting some of the preparation long before they have a chance to compete in it,” Celeste said.

In addition to the Envirothon, Oswego’s environmental club focuses on eco-tourism, fundraising and cleaning up around the district.

“We hope, bottom line, that there’s a better appreciation for nature, and we want our students to be better earth stewards,” Celeste said. “Every year they’re going to Envirothon, I know they’re learning something they didn’t know before.”

She said her students have worked hard to prepare for Envirothon.

“I’m proud that we can get students who put the time in,” she said.

Missing from tomorrow’s competition is ten-time consecutive winner G. Ray Bodley High School. The Fulton school is not fielding a team this year. Bodley last won in 2012, but was ousted last year by APW.

“Due to new duties and responsibilities, I relinquished the helm and it just didn’t transfer well for the students,” former GRB Envirothon adviser Dan Mainville told The Valley News in an email. “Sadly there just wasn’t enough interest this year. Maybe next year.”

“We will definitely miss them, but it opens up opportunities for other schools to win,” Schreiner said of Bodley’s absence from the competition.

“It opens the door a little bit for us,” Celeste said. “My students are a little more motivated now because they feel they can be more competitive.”

“There’s always someone to replace Fulton,” Thormann said. “I’m sure there’s someone who wants to knock us off the pedestal. All the teams are tough.”

Lois Helyn Brackett, former school bus driver

Lois Helyn Brackett, 70, died Saturday, April 26, 2014, at the home of her daughter in Palmyra.

Calling hours were April 29 at the Paul L. Murphy & Sons Funeral Home, 127 E. Miller St., Newark. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday April 30 (today) at the funeral home with Rev. Brian Maag officiating. Burial will follow in Newark Cemetery.

Memorials, in her name, may be made to the Cracker Box Palace, 6450 Shaker Road, Alton, New York 14413 or the American Cancer Society, 1120 South Goodman Street, Rochester, New York 14620.

Lois was born Nov. 7. 1943 in Paducah, Kentucky, the daughter of Laurance H. and Lois Helyn Ritchie Paquette.

She was a 1962 graduate of Fulton High School and had taken courses at the Community College of the Finger Lakes in Canandaigua. She was a member of the Woodlane Community Church.

Lois drove bus for the Newark School District, before her 29 year career as office manager at Paradise Veterinary Practice in Marion.  She competed in Dog Agility competitions and had won many ribbons.  Lois was proprietor of Glamor Paws Grooming and also bred, raised and trained horses.

Lois was dedicated to her family and is survived by her son Tim (Kathy) Brackett of Manchester; two daughters Tammy (Jean) Brackett of Alfred and Tara (Gary) Carr of Palmyra; her eight perfect grandchildren, as she would say, Christopher, Sara, Emily and Clavin Brackett, McKenna Jaden, Trentyn Carr and Samanatha Sims; her sister Janet (Charles) Giarratano of Newark; and her devoted dog Bella.

She was predeceased by her loving companion Donald VanHoute on Jan. 31, 2014.

murphyandsonsfuneralhome.com

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