Youth group wants to save children from slavery

The Cabin 3 Youth group of Gods Vision Christian Church in Hannibal and the Vintage Truth college age ministry held a 30-hour famine on Good Friday, April 18 in Hannibal to raise money and awareness for Agape International and World Vision Child sponsorship.

Many youth and adults stopped eating at 6 p.m. Thursday April 17 and did not eat again for 30 hours.

During this time the youth built cardboard houses to sleep in overnight. The youth also held a car wash and obtained sponsors to raise money for the charities.

Mission worker Jill Chatham from the Rochester area came to speak to the youth and share information about worldwide child slavery and trafficking.

Every country has some sort of child trafficking and every area of the United States also has child slavery and trafficking issues.

Chatham taught the youth about the reasons why youth get involved in slavery, why they get sold into slavery in poor countries and how American teens get lured into a lifestyle that is actually leading them and trapping them into slavery and trafficking.

Many countries have youth as young as six years old working 21 hours a day, peeling shrimp, sewing soccer balls and working as prostitutes.

Chatham also pointed out the many products that we as Americans use on a daily basis that most likely was grown by, prepared by or assembled by children, many slaves, many not able to return to their families.

Statistically one child is sold into slavery every 30 seconds and 35 percent are less than age 16. Officials estimate there are more than 27,000 slaves worldwide, half under the age of 18.

Agape International says they are ”fighting the ground war on sex trafficking in Cambodia. Our projects prevent, rescue, restore and reintegrate, impacting 10,000+ people a year.”

But Agape said this takes money and  that’s where groups like Cabin 3 come in. Every dollar given helps to change a life, restore a life.

This is the 10th year Cabin 3 has done a 30-hour famine, raising money for their sponsored child, “Ruth,” a little girl in Peru, as well as raising money for World Vision.

This is the third year Cabin 3 and Vintage Truth College group have raised money for Agape International.

The youth traveled to Buffalo, Tuesday April 29 to deliver the money they raised to Vintage at the Chapel at Cross point in Buffalo.

Anyone who would like to donate to either fund, or if you would like more information, call Erik at 564-6133 or go to www.cabin3ministries.org.

All area teens ages 10-18 are welcome to attend all Cabin 3 events and all older teens, college age and adults are welcome to come to Vintage Truth every Tuesday  at 8 p.m. at God’s Vision Christian Church at 326 Church St., Hannibal.

Birdlebough students earn presidential honors

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

With a dedication to community service and a focus on helping others, 19 Phoenix youth earned recognition during a ceremony at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5540 on Thursday night April 24.

Local dignitaries, school administrators and community representatives were on hand to commend the students for their dedication and volunteer service as part of the 18th annual President’s Youth Volunteer Service Award dinner.

“It’s an honor to be in the room with you,” said Brian Chetney, executive director of the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau. “This is a recognition program that honors tens of millions Americans who have made a commitment to sustained service … and you have all done your part.”

“Sustained” was the key word, as the honorees have devoted much of their free time to serving others. The juniors and seniors who received the silver distinction accumulated at least 300 volunteer hours,  while the gold recipients tallied at least 500 hours.

For John C. Birdlebough High School students Meganne Murphy and Dylan Switzer, who each earned the Youth of the Year Award, volunteer service has been a way of life.

“I started in first grade as a Boy Scout,” said Switzer, who earned his Eagle Scout badge in October. “I remember helping out at the shows for winter guard because my sister was in it. Volunteering is something I enjoy.”

Murphy began her community service contributions almost a decade ago.

“I’ve been volunteering since fifth grade, I started out as a Bridge House Brat,” she said. “It makes me feel good that I can make a difference.”

Although that positive feeling is enough to satisfy Murphy and Switzer, the additional recognition Thursday night was equally satisfying and humbling, they said.

“I was really surprised because I didn’t expect to get anything from being so involved,” Murphy said. “It means a lot to me to know that I’ve made a difference in the community.”

Switzer echoed those sentiments.

“It’s a big honor,” he said. “Honestly, I don’t know how the selection committee made the decision. There are other people who were just as deserving as me.”

Birdlebough Principal Greg Molloy spoke about the Youth of the Year recipients and the qualities that contributed to them receiving the distinction.

Prior to presenting them with plaques, he lauded their volunteer spirit and commended them for their commitment to the community.

In addition to the Youth of the Year Award presentation, Superintendent Judy Belfield and Phoenix Board of Education President Earl Rudy congratulated the Gold and Silver Award recipients and presented them with commemorative pins and certificates.

“Your efforts will make you a well-rounded and a better person,” Rudy told the students.

Gold Award winners were James Benthin, Ben Bulgrien, Finella Campanino, Trever Ferens, Eric Hillpot, Maria Musumeci, Matthew Pelton, Paige Recore, Brian Stafford, Shaun Turner, Ryan Thorn and Olivia Uttamsingh. Silver Award recipients were Hailee Claycomb, Gianna Garofalo, Bailey Goldthwait, Hannah Lees and Jessica Lord.

County Envirothon takes to the woods Thursday

By Ashley M. Casey

Bring your boots: rain or shine, young nature enthusiasts will be facing off tomorrow at the Oswego County Envirothon, held at Jellystone Park in Mexico.

Since 1991, the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District has sponsored the county’s Envirothon, a hands-on test of high school students’ knowledge of forestry, aquatics, soils, wildlife and current environmental issues.

The county winner goes on to the New York state competition. Last year’s county champion, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, came in 11th of 49 teams at the state Envirothon.

“(Envirothon) encourages students to be more in tune with the environment and the natural resources in the county,” said Erica Schreiner, district educator of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District and Envirothon Coordinator.

The competition consists of five 30-minute exams with 25 questions, plus a video presentation submitted prior to the event.

Teams of five students must properly identify trees, analyze soil and perform other tasks to demonstrate their environmental knowledge. Schools can send two teams of five with up to two alternates.

Local experts in each field create a new test for each subject each year. This year, the Oswego County branch of Cornell Cooperative Extension is covering the current issue of sustainable local agriculture.

Schreiner said Envirothon is an outdoorsy outlet to keep students engaged.

“It sparks their interest in something and gives them something to belong to,” she said. “It’s a great hands-on event.”

Some Envirothon participants pursue the interest after high school.

“A lot of them do go on to ESF (SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) at Syracuse and other environmental colleges,” Schreiner said.

Jamie Hefti, adviser of two Envirothon teams at Pulaski, said one of his graduating senior “stars” will study biology at Harvard University and another is headed to Clarkson University for environmental engineering.

He said the competition’s individual focus helps prepares students for college, especially the oral video presentation.

“It’s so self-directed. It’s on them,” Hefti said. “When I watched them prepare for the oral part of it, I think it’s the most truly applicable skill for preparing for college that there is in high school.”

Hefti said he has a study area in his classroom for students to visit and borrow materials when they have a free period during the day. The students each become an “expert” on one of the subjects and coach each other.

“It’s really an awesome thing to observe,” he said.

Roxane Thormann and her husband, Rich, led the APW team to a surprise victory last year. The Thormanns volunteered to coach APW’s Envirothon team after their daughter’s beloved science teacher retired. Roxane Thormann said she and her husband, who are not teachers, faced a “big learning curve” in coaching the kids in environmental science.

“We were awestruck,” Thormann said of the 2013 win, which was APW’s first Oswego County Envirothon victory. “We didn’t have any idea we had it in us. (The team was) just flabbergasted.”

Catherine Celeste and Billie Jo Peterson are the co-advisers of the environmental club at Oswego High School The club is open to students in grades seven through 12, so it provides a “feeder group” of middle schoolers preparing for the high school Envirothon team.

“I have a lot of younger kids … getting some of the preparation long before they have a chance to compete in it,” Celeste said.

In addition to the Envirothon, Oswego’s environmental club focuses on eco-tourism, fundraising and cleaning up around the district.

“We hope, bottom line, that there’s a better appreciation for nature, and we want our students to be better earth stewards,” Celeste said. “Every year they’re going to Envirothon, I know they’re learning something they didn’t know before.”

She said her students have worked hard to prepare for Envirothon.

“I’m proud that we can get students who put the time in,” she said.

Missing from tomorrow’s competition is ten-time consecutive winner G. Ray Bodley High School. The Fulton school is not fielding a team this year. Bodley last won in 2012, but was ousted last year by APW.

“Due to new duties and responsibilities, I relinquished the helm and it just didn’t transfer well for the students,” former GRB Envirothon adviser Dan Mainville told The Valley News in an email. “Sadly there just wasn’t enough interest this year. Maybe next year.”

“We will definitely miss them, but it opens up opportunities for other schools to win,” Schreiner said of Bodley’s absence from the competition.

“It opens the door a little bit for us,” Celeste said. “My students are a little more motivated now because they feel they can be more competitive.”

“There’s always someone to replace Fulton,” Thormann said. “I’m sure there’s someone who wants to knock us off the pedestal. All the teams are tough.”

Lois Helyn Brackett, former school bus driver

Lois Helyn Brackett, 70, died Saturday, April 26, 2014, at the home of her daughter in Palmyra.

Calling hours were April 29 at the Paul L. Murphy & Sons Funeral Home, 127 E. Miller St., Newark. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday April 30 (today) at the funeral home with Rev. Brian Maag officiating. Burial will follow in Newark Cemetery.

Memorials, in her name, may be made to the Cracker Box Palace, 6450 Shaker Road, Alton, New York 14413 or the American Cancer Society, 1120 South Goodman Street, Rochester, New York 14620.

Lois was born Nov. 7. 1943 in Paducah, Kentucky, the daughter of Laurance H. and Lois Helyn Ritchie Paquette.

She was a 1962 graduate of Fulton High School and had taken courses at the Community College of the Finger Lakes in Canandaigua. She was a member of the Woodlane Community Church.

Lois drove bus for the Newark School District, before her 29 year career as office manager at Paradise Veterinary Practice in Marion.  She competed in Dog Agility competitions and had won many ribbons.  Lois was proprietor of Glamor Paws Grooming and also bred, raised and trained horses.

Lois was dedicated to her family and is survived by her son Tim (Kathy) Brackett of Manchester; two daughters Tammy (Jean) Brackett of Alfred and Tara (Gary) Carr of Palmyra; her eight perfect grandchildren, as she would say, Christopher, Sara, Emily and Clavin Brackett, McKenna Jaden, Trentyn Carr and Samanatha Sims; her sister Janet (Charles) Giarratano of Newark; and her devoted dog Bella.

She was predeceased by her loving companion Donald VanHoute on Jan. 31, 2014.

murphyandsonsfuneralhome.com

Altmar woman dies in Thursday crash

An Altmar woman died Wednesday in a crash in the town of Albion.

Oswego County Sheriff’s Deputies said Andrea M. Raszi, 29, of State Soute 13, was driving her Chevrolet Venture east on State Route 13 near Austin Road at about 3:37 a.m. Thursday when she struck a guardrail and was ejected from the vehicle.

She was alone in the car.

She was pronounced dead at the scene.

Unsafe speed, no seatbelt, crossing hazardous markings and alcohol were contributing factor to the accident, deputies said.

Members of the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office, NOCA Ambulance, Altmar Fire Department and Williamstown Fire Department responded to scene.

The investigation is continuing.

Interns open new copy center in Oswego

iHeart Oswego Interns create and develop the new copy and print center Copies In Time which opened April 24. From left are Emily Chambers, Molly Darrow and Elizabeth Shepherd.
iHeart Oswego Interns create and develop the new copy and print center Copies In Time which opened April 24. From left are Emily Chambers, Molly Darrow and Elizabeth Shepherd.

Copies In Time, Oswego’s newest copy and print center, offers an array of services aimed at meeting the needs of virtually everyone that walks through the door.

Located in the iHeart Corp Incubator building at 29 W. Seneca St., Copies In Time is locally owned and operated, offering Oswego residents the option to shop locally without giving up competitive pricing.

SUNY Oswego Intern Elizabeth Shepherd says the idea is to “provide not only quality service and low prices, but convenience for customers as well.” Copies In Time will open early or stay open late by request in an attempt to meet the demands of all customers.

Development, planning and promotion for the launch of Copies In Time was provided by three SUNY Oswego students interning at iHeart Oswego through the college’s Experience Based Education program: Elizabeth Shepherd, Emily Chambers and Molly Darrow and led by Victoria Gailinas of iHeart Oswego.

“With advancements in technology such as computers and the Internet, people are forgetting the power of print media,” Chambers said. “In addition, the high quality printers generate a product much better than any home printer.”

The company byline, “Color is Everything,” refers to the exceptional quality of the prints produced by the company’s cutting edge equipment.

Copies In Time provides copy services including copies ranging in size from 8.5”x 11” to 11”x 17,” banners, brochures, posters, programs, and more.

Copies start at 8 cents each for black and white and 39 cent apiece for color. Finishing services such as binding and stapling are available as well.

The owners plan to have the store open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. It also will be open by appointment for business owners or students.

For more information, visit CopiesInTime.com, on Facebook, or call 402-6623.

WRVO wins Murrow Award

SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media earned a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association for “New York in the World,” a documentary based on research by famed broadcast journalist the late Garrick Utley, who was SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism. From left are WRVO news director Catherine Loper, documentary producer Sidsel Overgaard and senior producer Mark Lavonier.
SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media earned a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association for “New York in the World,” a documentary based on research by famed broadcast journalist the late Garrick Utley, who was SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism. From left are WRVO news director Catherine Loper, documentary producer Sidsel Overgaard and senior producer Mark Lavonier.

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

“New York in the World,” a documentary produced by SUNY Oswego-based WRVO Public Media, has won a 2014 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association.

The association has honored outstanding achievements in electronic journalism with the Murrow Awards since 1971.

Award recipients demonstrate the spirit of excellence that Murrow set as a standard for the profession of electronic journalism.

The hourlong “New York in the World” was produced by Sidsel Overgaard, a nationally recognized public radio reporter and contributor to WRVO; Mark Lavonier, senior producer; and Catherine Loper, director of news and public affairs.

The late Garrick Utley, who was a veteran journalist and SUNY Oswego senior fellow and professor of broadcasting and journalism, hosted the show and spent much of last year collaborating on and working to produce the documentary.

“We received the news that WRVO was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Award for ‘New York in the World’ with a mixture of great pride and deep sadness that collaborator and narrator Garrick Utley, one of the most distinguished international journalists of his era, will share the honor posthumously, having succumbed to cancer in February,” General Manager Michael S. Ameigh said.

Ameigh describes “New York in the World” as Utley’s project.

The documentary is based on research Utley commissioned as head of the SUNY Levin Institute, which promotes thoughtful engagement and an active response to globalization and its impact on New York state.

“That he invited WRVO to produce the documentary is in itself profoundly gratifying,” Ameigh said.

“New York in the World” shares stories of union workers in Buffalo, fashion designers in New York City and farmers in the Finger Lakes — all talking about how they’ve found a place amid the current economic realities.

In this era of globalization, no other state has benefited as much and suffered as much as New York, the documentary said. The documentary chronicles residents’ lives and their futures by examining the bonuses, bailouts and wealth on Wall Street; the remains of once-mighty manufacturing littering Upstate New York; and more.

To hear the documentary or read a transcript, visit http://bit.ly/1tytzri.

For more information, call 312-3690 or visit www.wrvo.org.

Minetto Cub Scouts learn first aid

The Minetto Cub Scout Pack 819 went on a “Go See It” to the Minetto Fire Department to learn about first aid. The scouts got a hands-on demonstration with firefighters Dan Buske and Tyler Vosseller showing the scouts what needed to be done in a situation when camping, hiking or riding a bike. Pictured left to right are firefighter Tyler Vosseller,  Jason Rodriguez, Kai Clary, Caden Inch, Logan Inch, Trey Tesoriero and firefighter Dan Buske.
The Minetto Cub Scout Pack 819 went on a “Go See It” to the Minetto Fire Department to learn about first aid. The scouts got a hands-on demonstration with firefighters Dan Buske and Tyler Vosseller showing the scouts what needed to be done in a situation when camping, hiking or riding a bike. Pictured left to right are firefighter Tyler Vosseller,
Jason Rodriguez, Kai Clary, Caden Inch, Logan Inch, Trey Tesoriero and firefighter Dan Buske.

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