Valley Viewpoints: Honor nursing home residents

To the Editor:

National Nursing Home Week, which begins on Mother’s Day May 11 and runs through May 17, honors the residents and patients currently in skilled nursing and rehabilitation care centers across the nation with special activities and events.

Sponsored each year since 1967 by the American Health Care Association, this year’s Nationa Nursing Home Week’s theme is “Living the Aloha Spirit.

In Hawaii, by “Living the Aloha Spirit,” a person shows love and respect to others and joyfully shares life to create a better world. Care centers strive daily to attain this ideal for all individuals in their care by focusing on person-centered care and continuous improvement.

This special week is also about people giving care. Caregivers often form meaningful, enduring relationships with residents and families that are beneficial to everyone – to the resident and to the caregivers who often consider each other “family.”

These workers help residents overcome the daily struggles associated with age, rehabilitation and disability.

 Nursing Home Week can be a time to reflect on the many challenges that society faces to ensure elderly parents and others are able to access the quality services they need in a skilled nursing care center.

Some of the national issues that one day may impede such access include: federal reductions in Medicare payments; limitations on therapy services, such as physical therapy; and government Medicaid payments that are on average $24.26 below the cost of providing care.

Most importantly for the week of May 11–17, National Nursing Home Wee is a great time to visit a loved one, friend, acquaintance or veteran. Take some time with the family to reach out and let a care center resident or patient know that you are thinking about them by visiting.

If you can’t do that, then make a phone call, send a card, flowers, or even an email. This special attention will surely help someone catch that “Aloha Spirit.”

Richard J. Herrick
President and CEO
New York State Health Facilities Association
Albany

Valley Viewpoints: Step up for youth soccer

To the Editor:

Fulton Youth Soccer has started its 36 consecutive year of play.

We had some sour weather early on, but we pushed through and are off to a great start. This year we had a situation arise that we have never encountered before and I want to explain the reason for that.

Starting last year we put a cap on the number of players each team can have.  We set that number at twice the number of players on the field, plus a goalie.

Continue reading

Valley Viewpoints: Pierce questions library vote

To the Editor:

The May 20 school budget vote will include a proposition regarding the Fulton Public Library.

With this proposition, the library trustees are asking to change the library to a “School District Public Library.” They are also asking voters to approve an annual budget of $350,000 a year for five years, which totals $1.75 million.

This proposition can be very misleading if not read completely before voting on it. Continue reading

Hodgepodge: Congratulations, Camden Hodge!

A Little Hodgepodge

As a testimony to how swiftly time escapes us, the following was part of this column on October 18, 1992:

There’s a new little Hodgepodge in our lives these days. Courtney is a proud big sister. The new little brother arrived almost on schedule last month in Roanoke, Va.

His name is Camden Stephen Hodge, our first grandson. Camden weighed in at 9 pounds, 11 ounces.

A hefty, healthy kid, he was able to play two quarters with the local football team the next day. (Just kidding, it was really only a couple of plays.) Continue reading

Sunrise Rotarians learn benefits of massage

At a recent Sunrise Rotary meeting, Rotarian Linda Rossiter, left, introduced Donna DuBois-Taylor, a registered nurse and licensed massage therapist. DuBois-Taylor works for the Oswego County Health Department as an RN and in her Fulton business as a massage therapist. She described various methods of massage and how very important therapeutic massage can be to most people. She studied oncology massage and works on occasion with Hospice patients. She can be reached at 402-0111. The Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. each Friday at Fulton’s Riverside Inn.
At a recent Sunrise Rotary meeting, Rotarian Linda Rossiter, left, introduced Donna DuBois-Taylor, a registered nurse and licensed massage therapist. DuBois-Taylor works for the Oswego County Health Department as an RN and in her Fulton business as a massage therapist. She described various methods of massage and how very important therapeutic massage can be to most people. She studied oncology massage and works on occasion with Hospice patients. She can be reached at 402-0111. The Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. each Friday at Fulton’s Riverside Inn.

Historical Fulton, N.Y.

This adorable photo shows the former Falley Seminary sometime in the 1890s. According to research done by the Friends of History at the Pratt House in Fulton, the school opened in 1836 as Fulton Female Seminary and was run by the Presbyterian Church. In 1842, it allowed boys to attend and changed its name to Fulton Academy. In 1849, the Presbyterians sold it so the Methodists and it was renamed Falley Seminary after a well-to-do Fultonian, George Falley. He gave the Methodists $4,000 to buy the building. The school was at its height of glory in the 1860s. In 1869, a man named Mr. Gilmour became the principal there and remained until the school closed in 1883. His wife, Mrs. Gilmour, lived there until she died in 1901. The building was torn down in 1922. The seminar, a boarding school, was on the site of the present Education Center on Fourth Street. This photo shows some children putting on a mock wedding with the old seminary building as a backdrop.  Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
This adorable photo shows the former Falley Seminary sometime in the 1890s. According to research done by the Friends of History at the Pratt House in Fulton, the school opened in 1836 as Fulton Female Seminary and was run by the Presbyterian Church. In 1842, it allowed boys to attend and changed its name to Fulton Academy. In 1849, the Presbyterians sold it so the Methodists and it was renamed Falley Seminary after a well-to-do Fultonian, George Falley. He gave the Methodists $4,000 to buy the building. The school was at its height of glory in the 1860s. In 1869, a man named Mr. Gilmour became the principal there and remained until the school closed in 1883. His wife, Mrs. Gilmour, lived there until she died in 1901. The building was torn down in 1922. The seminar, a boarding school, was on the site of the present Education Center on Fourth Street. This photo shows some children putting on a mock wedding with the old seminary building as a backdrop.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com

Fulton senior dining center menus

Here are the Fulton Senior Dining and Activity Center menus for lunch for the next two weeks:

  • Monday, May 19 – Open faced turkey with mashed potatoes and gravy, veggies
  • Tuesday, May 20 – Soup and sandwich
  • Wednesday, May 21 –Turkey sloppy Joe, baked beans
  • Thursday, May 22 –Lemon chicken breast with mushrooms, rice pilaf and veggies
  • Friday, May 23 – Swedish meatballs with egg noodles, vegetable blend
  • Monday, May 26 – Program closed for Memorial Day holiday
  • Tuesday, May 27 – Beef stew with vegetables
  • Wednesday, May 28 –Macaroni and cheese with stewed tomatoes and vegetable blend
  • Thursday, May 29 – Barbecue chicken picnic style lunch (Reservation needed)
  • Friday, May 30 – Spanish rice with vegetables

All meals include milk and dessert. Lunch is served at noon.

Activities daily at 11 a.m.

For reservations, call Eileen 24 hours in advance at 592-3408.

The Fulton Senior Wii Bowlers are once again undefeated. Both of the Fulton senior teams won their conferences. They competed for seven weeks of virtual play and came out on top and are the 2014 Senior League Conference Champions. Pictured left to right are: back row,  Randy Williams, Allen Clark, Bob Calderwood and Joe Wolcik. Seated left to right are: Tom Bergman and Fred Bolio. Missing from the picture are Elsie Tucci and Gordon Haskins.
The Fulton Senior Wii Bowlers are once again undefeated. Both of the Fulton senior teams won their conferences. They competed for seven weeks of virtual play and came out on top and are the 2014 Senior League Conference Champions. Pictured left to right are: back row, Randy Williams, Allen Clark, Bob Calderwood and Joe Wolcik. Seated left to right are: Tom Bergman and Fred Bolio. Missing from the picture are Elsie Tucci and Gordon Haskins.

The dining and activity center is a program of Oswego County Opportunities.

OCO, Inc is a private, nonprofit agency that has been supporting communities throughout Oswego County since 1966. A member agency of the United Way of Greater Oswego County, OCO provides more than 50 vital services throughout 80 separate locations.

For more information, visit oco.org.

Fulton parks lookin’ good after Sparkle a Park event

Submitted by Kelley Weaver
Friends of Fulton Parks

What is Earth Week?

In 1969, at a UNESCO Conference in San Francisco, peace activist John McConnell proposed a day to honor the Earth and the concept of peace, to first be celebrated March 21, 1970, the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere.

A month later a separate Earth Day was founded by U.S. Sen. Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in first held April 22, 1970.

In Fulton, N.Y., from April to May 2014 is a celebration of community and an opportunity to work outside together for the common good.

It is about our earth, and about the people who share it with us.

Among the Earth Week events were the Sparkle-a-Park activities, coordinated by Friends of Fulton Parks and the Department of Parks and Recreation. Businesses, organizations, families, churches, youth, senior citizens, college students and individuals banded together to make a huge difference in our community parks this Earth Week.

Steve Ives and John Kardash used their chainsaw mastery to fell some trees and clear some brush at Rowlee Beach Park.

When asked why he volunteered, Ives replied, “This park was the center of life when I was growing up.” Kardash answered, “I want to make amends for the trouble I caused this city when I was young.”

The Bradley Warner family cleaned up litter from sections of Lincoln Park while Another Level Youth group, led by Chris Green, worked on more litter at the park.

Knowing that it is a sound practice to plant a tree if you cut one down, several students from the Cayuga Community College planted trees at Recreation Park. Price Chopper employees showed their concern for Recreation Park by raking and disposing of litter on Earth Day.

Walmart Personnel Director Michelle Sherman brought her granddaughters to “sparkle” Foster Park. Hailee shared her strong opinion about litter: “This litter is gross! Why don’t people throw trash in the garbage can?”

Her sister Alison stopped to smell the flowers. 

Mike Hardesty, Walmart Supercenter Manager, and several employees and families showed their appreciation of Foster Park by cleaning up litter and raking debris.

Del and Cherie Lenhart said “we love this park and want to help keep it clean.”

David Ryan, DJR Landscaping, offered his expertise and skill to perform a horticultural makeover at Schenck Park. He donated his materials and time for this project. Enjoy it as you pass by, or take a load off and sit on the nearby bench to enjoy.

Oswego Industries personnel and participants picked up litter at Van Buren Park. They enjoyed it so much, they want to help out during the summer also.

The Doug Chapman family “sparkled” Bullhead Point because “it is a place that is special to our hearts.”

Members of Fulton Alliance Church removed litter from Veterans Park and the Towpath Trail as their annual participation in Canal Clean Sweep.

On May 10 (today), Dental Health Solutions will be working at Patrick Park and Another Level Youth will be working at Quirk Park. Feel free to join them!

Everyone who helped to beautify the city also helped to inspire or encourage others to take pride in our small piece of the earth.

Your hometown. Your news.