Ooh la la — Fairley art is magnifique

Fairley Elementary School fourth-grader Jordan McCombie shows off her artwork as she stands alongside art teacher Jeannette Gillett. The work was featured in a school-wide art show Tuesday night.
Fairley Elementary School fourth-grader Jordan McCombie shows off her artwork as she stands alongside art teacher Jeannette Gillett. The work was featured in a school-wide art show Tuesday night.

The hallways in Hannibal’s Fairley Elementary School were transformed into a French art museum Tuesday, May 20 during a school-wide art show.

In the spirit of the Paris theme, students in Jeannette Gillett’s art classes created their own “Mona Lisa” masterpieces, miniature Eiffel towers and similar works. They used a variety of art mediums to make their projects, which were on display — along with a light-up Eiffel Tower creation — in the hallways near the art classroom.

“Every grade made something based on the French art theme,” Gillett said. “We learned about different French artists and the projects were inspired by artists like Kandinsky.”

Parents had a chance to view the work from 5-7 p.m. Tuesday in conjunction with the school book fair.

Hannibal students jump ropes for others hearts

At left, Dennis M. Kenney Middle School student Makayla Ritchie is a hero and signs her name to a duck on the Heart Hero Pond poster during a Jump Rope for Heart event to celebrate the school’s more than $1,500 donation to the American Heart Association. Pictured with Makayla is Kenney phyiscal education teacher Penny Leonard. At right, seventh-graders Alyssa Beck cathes some air and shows off her jump roping skills at the Jump Rope for Heart event. Pictured with Alyssa is Ciara Farnham, foreground, and Brigette Reed, background. The celebration was held to honor Kenney students for their commitment to American Heart Association’s National Jump Rope for Heart fundraising and awareness campaign.
At left, Dennis M. Kenney Middle School student Makayla Ritchie is a hero and signs her name to a duck on the Heart Hero Pond poster during a Jump Rope for Heart event to celebrate the school’s more than $1,500 donation to the American Heart Association. Pictured with Makayla is Kenney phyiscal education teacher Penny Leonard. The celebration was held to honor Kenney students for their commitment to American Heart Association’s National Jump Rope for Heart fundraising and awareness campaign.

Dennis M. Kenney Middle School (KMS) in the Hannibal Central School District is filled with heroes, heroes that quite literally jumped at the opportunity to help others.

Over 50 middle school students along with their physical education teachers Penny Leonard and Dan Pawlewicz made a commitment to join the American Heart Association in its annual Jump Rope For Heart fundraising campaign.  Continue reading

In and Around Hannibal: Memorial Day

Memorial Day was first celebrated in 1882, but did not become common until after World War I.

Prior to that time, the holiday was called  Decoration Day and was to honor both the Union and Confederate soldiers that had fallen during the Civil War.

Memorial Day is a day set aside to honor those who have died in service to their country. It was originally celebrated on May 30, but in 1968, the Congress changed the date to the fourth Monday in May.   Continue reading

Rotarians hear from business planner

Jeff Grimshaw, a former member of the Fulton Noon Rotary Club when he was director of the Fulton Family YMCA, was introduced by Rotarian Nancy Kush Ellis at a recent meeting. Grimshaw now is director of the SUNY Office of Business and Community Relations and has a staff of nine people who assist him in caring for the RSVP  program, Leadership Oswego County, Workforce Development and THRIVE. Grimshaw discussed the THRIVE program with the Rotarians. He said the present economic growth model of providing Payments in Lieu of Taxes to entice companies to come to an area is no longer working. He said “The Rain Forest,” by Hwang and Horowitt, outlines another concept of how communities can help themselves prosper and grow by using the resources available to them today. Grimshaw wants to hear from community members on “building a stronger community.” Go to oswego.edu/thrive and click on “Take our Rainforest Scorecard Survey.” The “Rain Forest” theory shows how any community in this country has the necessary business and industries active in their given area. Local businesses need to grow, create new products, hire new employees, remain part of their community and grow without excessive government help, according to the theory.
Jeff Grimshaw, a former member of the Fulton Noon Rotary Club when he was director of the Fulton Family YMCA, was introduced by Rotarian Nancy Kush Ellis at a recent meeting. Grimshaw now is director of the SUNY Office of Business and Community Relations and has a staff of nine people who assist him in caring for the RSVP program, Leadership Oswego County, Workforce Development and THRIVE. Grimshaw discussed the THRIVE program with the Rotarians. He said the present economic growth model of providing Payments in Lieu of Taxes to entice companies to come to an area is no longer working. He said “The Rain Forest,” by Hwang and Horowitt, outlines another concept of how communities can help themselves prosper and grow by using the resources available to them today. Grimshaw wants to hear from community members on “building a stronger community.” Go to oswego.edu/thrive and click on “Take our Rainforest Scorecard Survey.” The “Rain Forest” theory shows how any community in this country has the necessary business and industries active in their given area. Local businesses need to grow, create new products, hire new employees, remain part of their community and grow without excessive government help, according to the theory.

Hospital benefits from local quilts

Project Linus is a national organization that makes and distributes homemade blankets to children who have had a traumatic experience or illness. This year, a group including retired teachers from Hannibal, along with their friends and the Confirmation Class from Holy Trinity Church in Fulton, were able to complete more than 40 quilts over the course of two days. The quilts will be distributed in Oswego and Onondaga counties, with the majority going to Golisano Children’s Hospital. Shown left to right are: Jacob Bailey, Spencer Vono, Linda Farden, Veronica LaBarge, Karen Lupa, Karen Fadden, Jean Niver, Jeanette Peterson, Irene Caruana and Debbie Henderson.
Project Linus is a national organization that makes and distributes homemade blankets to children who have had a traumatic experience or illness. This year, a group including retired teachers from Hannibal, along with their friends and the Confirmation Class from Holy Trinity Church in Fulton, were able to complete more than 40 quilts over the course of two days. The quilts will be distributed in Oswego and Onondaga counties, with the majority going to Golisano Children’s Hospital. Shown left to right are: Jacob Bailey, Spencer Vono, Linda Farden, Veronica LaBarge, Karen Lupa, Karen Fadden, Jean Niver, Jeanette Peterson, Irene Caruana and Debbie Henderson.

Hodgepodge: Road trippin’ part two, a spot of tea, and squiggly lines

Trip Leftovers

When we left home for our trip to Virginia, we had a box of Hostas from our garden to take to son Craig.

Craig and Penny have many beautiful gardens all around their home in Roanoke, and have sent me home from past visits with many plants from their gardens.

When I gave the Hostas to Craig, he said he was going to share them with his friend, Byron (Bubba to me), for the gardens at his home.  Craig reminded me he is pretty sure that I have some beautiful orchid Irises from Bubba’s mother’s garden growing in my garden.

One last note: I’m not sure how some of those Hostas ended up in my garden in the first place. Is it possible that some of them came from Virginia? Continue reading

Your hometown. Your news.