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Treasure Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt begins Wednesday

Valley News Treasure Our Parks Medallion Hunt 2014 Map(1)
Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News. Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News.

 

Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)
Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know where all your city parks are located?
On Wednesday, Friends of Fulton Parks’ 2015 Teasure Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt will begin with a clue inside The Valley News.
The contest, which is designed to get everyone more acquainted with the 14 beautiful parks the city offers, consists of a medallion being hidden somewhere in one of those parks.
To find the medallion, residents must first read The Valley News. Readers will find the first clue on a special page that spotlights the contest and participating sponsors.
On Saturday, June 27, a second clue will appear in both The Valley News and the Oswego County Advertiser.
A photograph of the medallion appears above. To help out, there also is a map above showing where all the city parks are located.
The first person to find the medallion and return it FOFP will be rewarded with a $250 shopping spree courtesy of the Valley News and the participating businesses. The winner will be awarded five $50 gift certificates from their choice of five different businesses who are sponsoring this year’s event.
The first person to find the medallion and return it FOFP will be rewarded with a $250 shopping spree courtesy of the Valley News and the participating businesses. The winner will be awarded five $50 gift certificates from their choice of five different businesses who are sponsoring this year’s event.
Members of Friends of Fulton Parks came up with the idea for the contest last year when thinking about all the beauty and fun the parks have to offer. Kelley Weaver, board president, thought an event like this might help some residents get to know parks they otherwise might not explore.
“People usually know their one park — the one they like or the one in their neighborhood,” she said. “But what about the others?”
In addition to the medallion, some other items will be hidden during the event that can also be redeemed for prizes. Each day, a separate clue will appear on www.valleynewsonline.com regarding the locations of some stones (see photos) hidden by FOFP members. These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize through FOFP. The group will also hide four letter tiles (see photos) throughout the parks. There will be no clues for this search, but anyone who finds a tile will get to redeem it through FOFP for a $25 gift card. Several small
The Fulton parks are scattered throughout the city. Three – Bullhead Point, Recreation Park and Indian Point – are on the water. Ten have playgrounds. One is simply a serene place to sit on a bench and gaze at the garden. One honors our veterans.

Rules for the treasure hunt:
1. The Treasure Hunt begins at sunrise on Wednesday, June 24, and ends at sunset on Saturday, June 27.
2. The medallion, tiles and stones are all hidden in the ten parks listed on the map. Search during daylight hours only.
3. Be safe. The items are not hidden near the road or water bodies. Keep your feet on the ground. There is no need to climb or dig. Search at your own risk.
4. The contest is open to all ages. Board members of Friends of Fulton Parks, employees of the Valley News and prior year grand prize winners are not eligible for prizes.
5. The person who finds the medallion or tiles must notify Friends of Fulton Parks as soon as possible, by calling 402-7431. Once verified, the winner will be posted on valleynewsonline.com
6. The grand prize, awarded to whoever finds to medallion, is a $250 shopping spree that includes five $50 gift cards for our participating sponsors, courtesy of the Valley News.
7. Only one prize awarded per household. Winners are responsible for taxes on their winnings.
8. The Valley News, Friends of Fulton Parks, and the City of Fulton are not responsible for any perceived loss or damage related to this contest.

 

 

Fulton’s 2015 Veteran of the Year named

By Nicole Shue
The Fulton Veterans Council has named John Young, Commander at the American Legion Post 587, its 2015 Veteran of the Year.
Young grew up in Gouverneur, about two hours north of Fulton. He had six uncles who were WWII veterans, but initially hadn’t given much thought to his own career path. That is, until a friend casually asked him to join the Air Force.

John Young
John Young

“We were at a county fair with our girlfriends and my buddy said hey let’s go sign up for the Air Force, I’ll pick you up in the morning,” Young said.
Young attended college for one year before starting basic training in San Antonio, Texas. From there, he attended a 12-week radar operator school in Mississippi.
Joining “Charlie Crew,” Young was a part of a 40-person team that controlled the border from a radar station in West Germany. At the height of the Cold War, searching the skies made for a highly strenuous job.
Young remembers the day his crew was put on high alert following the shooting of President John F. Kennedy.
“I was in the barracks playing cards when the sirens went off,” said Young. “We grabbed our weapons and headed to the NATO Operations Center.”
Communication during the 1960s was much different than what it is in the military today.

The Fulton Veterans Council has named John Young, who served as a radar operator during the Cold War, as its 2015 Veteran of the Year. Young (right) is pictured with a friend at Langerkopf Radar Station in West Germany during the summer of 1963.
The Fulton Veterans Council has named John Young, who served as a radar operator during the Cold War, as its 2015 Veteran of the Year. Young (right) is pictured with a friend at Langerkopf Radar Station in West Germany during the summer of 1963.

“There were a lot of unknowns,” said Young.
It was a few days before his crew learned the details surrounding the president’s death.
Young returned home after three years in West Germany, and began working for General Motors. He retired from Goulds Pumps Incorporated in Auburn.
Young has held the title of Commander at Post 587 for the past five years. He is also the Service Officer for the Fulton Veterans Council. He is responsible for ordering the flags for the city’s local VFW and American Legion. The flags placed on the grave markers of veterans, laid to rest in Fulton’s seven cemeteries, are also Young’s work.
In his spare time, Young has also given people rides to the VA Medical Center for their appointments, and helped deliver Christmas gifts to the families of hospitalized vets.
Young was surprised at the honor of being nominated Veteran of the Year, having only been a resident of the county for a decade.
“There are a great group of veterans in this city. I wish that more of our community shared in our ceremonies for veterans,” said Young. “There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think about that place and those guys.”

Friends of Oswego County Hospice to host regatta, walk/run June 7

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Friends of Oswego County Hospice’s premier fundraising event -- the Oswego County Hospice Cup Regatta and 5K Walk/Run for Hope. Last year, the event raised nearly $27,000 in 2013 and in the past 14 years, it has raised more than $275,000 to support Oswego County Hospice patients and their families. On Saturday June 7, the event filled-day will recognize 25 years of Oswego County Hospice’s comprehensive, supportive services to patients and families at the end of life and throughout the grieving process. Thousands of patients and families in Oswego County have been fortunate enough to receive this first-rate, compassionate care from Hospice’s team of nurses, social workers, bereavement coordinators, volunteers, nutritionists, pastoral/spiritual care, home health aides and physical/occupational therapists. The Regatta events kick off with the 5K Walk/Run for Hope, sponsored by Harbor Pharmacy. Anyone interested in participating can register at ezracereg.com. Registrations will also be accepted on race day. The Walk/Run for Hope is at 8:30 a.m., starting and finishing at the Wright’s Landing pavilion. Sailing races on Lake Ontario get underway at 10 a.m. at the Oswego Yacht Club. Major sponsors for this year are Exelon Generation, Entergy, PathFinder Bank, Kinney Drugs Foundation, NBT Bank, the Richard S. Shineman Foundation and NRG. Shown after a planning session for the regatta at the Oswego Yacht Club are, front, Suzan Segal of the Oswego Yacht Club; Lauren Pistel of the Shineman Foundation, Rhonda Hutchins of Pathfinder Bank and Debbie Bishop, Friend of Oswego County Hospice. Back row is Donna Moonan, NRG, Jim Feeney of Entergy, Jack Palmer of Kinney Drugs, Jamie Branshaw of Harbor Pharmacy and Barb Bateman of NBT Bank. The children are Abigail Bianco, standing, and Olivia Dorsey, being held.  Valley News photo by Debra J. Groom
This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Friends of Oswego County Hospice’s premier fundraising event — the Oswego County Hospice Cup Regatta and 5K Walk/Run for Hope. Last year, the event raised nearly $27,000 in 2013 and in the past 14 years, it has raised more than $275,000 to support Oswego County Hospice patients and their families. On Saturday June 7, the event filled-day will recognize 25 years of Oswego County Hospice’s comprehensive, supportive services to patients and families at the end of life and throughout the grieving process. Thousands of patients and families in Oswego County have been fortunate enough to receive this first-rate, compassionate care from Hospice’s team of nurses, social workers, bereavement coordinators, volunteers, nutritionists, pastoral/spiritual care, home health aides and physical/occupational therapists. The Regatta events kick off with the 5K Walk/Run for Hope, sponsored by Harbor Pharmacy. Anyone interested in participating can register at ezracereg.com. Registrations will also be accepted on race day. The Walk/Run for Hope is at 8:30 a.m., starting and finishing at the Wright’s Landing pavilion. Sailing races on Lake Ontario get underway at 10 a.m. at the Oswego Yacht Club. Major sponsors for this year are Exelon Generation, Entergy, PathFinder Bank, Kinney Drugs Foundation, NBT Bank, the Richard S. Shineman Foundation and NRG. Shown after a planning session for the regatta at the Oswego Yacht Club are, front, Suzan Segal of the Oswego Yacht Club; Lauren Pistel of the Shineman Foundation, Rhonda Hutchins of Pathfinder Bank and Debbie Bishop, Friend of Oswego County Hospice. Back row is Donna Moonan, NRG, Jim Feeney of Entergy, Jack Palmer of Kinney Drugs, Jamie Branshaw of Harbor Pharmacy and Barb Bateman of NBT Bank. The children are Abigail Bianco, standing, and Olivia Dorsey, being held.

Valley News photo by Debra J. Groom

Drawing benefits church anniversary

Pictured above is Harold Porter purchasing a ticket for a hand-made quilt donated by Barbara Gifford.  The proceeds from the sales will go toward the Hannibal United Methodist Church’s 175th Celebration/Revival being planned for 11 a.m. June 22 with an outdoor revival-type service under the tent. Period reenactors and other dignitaries will participate. Following the worship service, a light lunch will be provided followed by guest musicians and recognitions. To purchase tickets, contact any church member or call 564-5412.
Pictured above is Harold Porter purchasing a ticket for a hand-made quilt donated by Barbara Gifford. The proceeds from the sales will go toward the Hannibal United Methodist Church’s 175th Celebration/Revival being planned for 11 a.m. June 22 with an outdoor revival-type service under the tent. Period reenactors and other dignitaries will participate. Following the worship service, a light lunch will be provided followed by guest musicians and recognitions. To purchase tickets, contact any church member or call 564-5412.

Sunrise Rotarians learn benefits of massage

At a recent Sunrise Rotary meeting, Rotarian Linda Rossiter, left, introduced Donna DuBois-Taylor, a registered nurse and licensed massage therapist. DuBois-Taylor works for the Oswego County Health Department as an RN and in her Fulton business as a massage therapist. She described various methods of massage and how very important therapeutic massage can be to most people. She studied oncology massage and works on occasion with Hospice patients. She can be reached at 402-0111. The Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. each Friday at Fulton’s Riverside Inn.
At a recent Sunrise Rotary meeting, Rotarian Linda Rossiter, left, introduced Donna DuBois-Taylor, a registered nurse and licensed massage therapist. DuBois-Taylor works for the Oswego County Health Department as an RN and in her Fulton business as a massage therapist. She described various methods of massage and how very important therapeutic massage can be to most people. She studied oncology massage and works on occasion with Hospice patients. She can be reached at 402-0111. The Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. each Friday at Fulton’s Riverside Inn.

Historical Fulton, N.Y.

This adorable photo shows the former Falley Seminary sometime in the 1890s. According to research done by the Friends of History at the Pratt House in Fulton, the school opened in 1836 as Fulton Female Seminary and was run by the Presbyterian Church. In 1842, it allowed boys to attend and changed its name to Fulton Academy. In 1849, the Presbyterians sold it so the Methodists and it was renamed Falley Seminary after a well-to-do Fultonian, George Falley. He gave the Methodists $4,000 to buy the building. The school was at its height of glory in the 1860s. In 1869, a man named Mr. Gilmour became the principal there and remained until the school closed in 1883. His wife, Mrs. Gilmour, lived there until she died in 1901. The building was torn down in 1922. The seminar, a boarding school, was on the site of the present Education Center on Fourth Street. This photo shows some children putting on a mock wedding with the old seminary building as a backdrop.  Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
This adorable photo shows the former Falley Seminary sometime in the 1890s. According to research done by the Friends of History at the Pratt House in Fulton, the school opened in 1836 as Fulton Female Seminary and was run by the Presbyterian Church. In 1842, it allowed boys to attend and changed its name to Fulton Academy. In 1849, the Presbyterians sold it so the Methodists and it was renamed Falley Seminary after a well-to-do Fultonian, George Falley. He gave the Methodists $4,000 to buy the building. The school was at its height of glory in the 1860s. In 1869, a man named Mr. Gilmour became the principal there and remained until the school closed in 1883. His wife, Mrs. Gilmour, lived there until she died in 1901. The building was torn down in 1922. The seminar, a boarding school, was on the site of the present Education Center on Fourth Street. This photo shows some children putting on a mock wedding with the old seminary building as a backdrop.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com