Tag Archives: SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego ranks high on U.S. News list of online MBA programs

SUNY Oswego’s online MBA ranks 26th best among comparable degree programs at more than 200 colleges and universities nationwide, according to U.S. News’ 2013 “Best Online Graduate Business Programs” rankings.

The U.S. News survey weighed faculty credentials and training, student services and technology, student engagement, admissions selectivity and peer reputation.

Oswego’s ranking puts it in the top 12 percent nationally of the 213 schools with online MBA programs responding to the U.S. News questionnaire.

U.S. News published numerical rankings for the top 148 institutions on the list. Washington State University’s program ranked No. 1. New York has five institutions in the top 50.

In addition to Oswego, they are Clarkson University, Marist College, Syracuse University and Rochester Institute of Technology.

“I am very pleased to see our ranking among schools offering online MBAs,” said Richard Skolnik, dean of the School of Business at SUNY Oswego. “However, what is more satisfying about it is the quality of students and quality of education we have in our online MBA program.”

Skolnik pointed to the rich mix of students in the online courses: students in a variety of occupations seeking the convenience of a setting whose time and location are not fixed, those who would find it difficult to leave careers and families for a residential MBA, along with students in traditional, classroom-based MBA programs.

“The rigor of the program is the same as courses held in a traditional classroom,” he said. “It requires a significant amount of time and attention for the students and faculty.”

Oswego ranked near the top in the U.S. News survey in terms of faculty credentials and training. Full-time faculty members teach many of the online MBA courses, Skolnik said.

“The quality of the online program speaks to the investment SUNY Oswego has made in online education,” Skolnik said.

He credited instructional designers, campus technology personnel and the SUNY Learning Network for the online MBA program’s success, as well as faculty and students.

“There’s a lot of support and feedback throughout the entire process and that helps create a quality experience,” he said.

SUNY Oswego repeats on list of ‘Best Value Colleges’

The Princeton Review and USA Today have named SUNY Oswego to their 2013 list of 150 “best value” colleges and universities in the nation.

The list of 75 public and 75 private institutions appears in the book “The Best Value Colleges: 2013 Edition,” released Feb. 5 by Random House and Princeton Review, as well as on USA Today’s website at http://bestvaluecolleges.usatoday.com.

“Providing a high-quality education, as well as preparing undergraduates for the job market and a life of continued learning, are paramount at Oswego,” Princeton Review states in the book’s profile of SUNY Oswego.

It cites the college’s unique Oswego Guarantee, which promises undergraduates that their on-campus room and board costs will not increase during their four years of study. The profile praises the college situated on the shore of Lake Ontario for its “picturesque natural setting” along with its “strong honors program,” “excellent study-abroad options,” and “wonderful connection to alumni” who help students find their way into careers.

“We are delighted once again to be recognized by the Princeton Review,” said Dan Griffin, interim director of admissions at Oswego. “It speaks to our commitment to education, to student development, and the wide variety of in-demand programs we offer. Particularly during these difficult economic times, to be recognized as a ‘Best Value’ means a lot to our students and their families.”

The editors of the Princeton Review quote Oswego students they surveyed who described the college as “a great education for the money,” “friendly” and “helpful,” a place where everyone finds acceptance in the variety of student clubs and opportunities for involvement.

According to the Princeton Review, it selected “Best Value Colleges” based on institutional data and student opinion surveys collected from 650 colleges and universities that it regards as the nation’s academically best undergraduate institutions.

Criteria included the quality of academics, cost of attendance, financial aid, percentage of graduating seniors who borrowed from any loan program and the average dollar amount of debt those students had at graduation.

Oswego is one of 18 New York colleges on the list including seven SUNY institutions: four of the public university system’s doctoral-granting campuses and two other master’s-level colleges like Oswego — Geneseo and Purchase.

Guide names SUNY Oswego a ‘military-friendly college’

SUNY Oswego has been designated a military-friendly college in Military Advanced Education’s 2013 guide.

The publication, which helps inform education service officers, transition officers and the service members they counsel, named SUNY Oswego to its annual list in the “2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities,” noting that schools on the list “go out of their way to implement military-friendly policies in support of our men and women in uniform.”

SUNY Oswego joined Syracuse University, Canisius College, Rochester Institute of Technology and SUNY colleges at Canton and Potsdam, among other New York institutions, on the national list.

“I think the designation shows the extent the campus goes to to provide a welcoming environment (for current service members and those transitioning to civilian life) and to give them the specific support they need,” said Benjamin Parker, academic planning coordinator for SUNY Oswego’s Division of Extended Learning.

“There are specific challenges for veterans,” Parker said. “Oswego has put in the effort to be knowledgeable about those challenges and to put in the support structures to minimize those challenges.”

Among the attributes considered in evaluating this year’s colleges and universities for inclusion in the Military Advanced Education guide are the flexibility of online learning options, extent of transfer credits accepted by degree level, on-campus active duty and veteran assistance, faculty trained in veteran reintegration issues, presence on military installations, and full-time counselors trained in veteran-specific mental health concerns.

Parker said Oswego’s services to veterans include counselors who have made it a priority to obtain professional development and training around veterans issues, weekly in-person presence of a college representative at Fort Drum, acceptance at full value of credits earned for military schooling and training, increased opportunities for faculty and staff to learn the challenges facing returning service members, establishing relationships with community institutions that routinely assist veterans and promoting flexibility in academic options.

“I advise all the evening degree and online students,” Parker said. “If a veteran student needs that flexibility, they’re already talking to the person who can help them get into the (class) sections.”

The college has a cross-campus, interoffice committee working to further improve veterans’ services, he said. Parker makes himself available at the outset to military members and veterans transitioning to college life.

“We’ve streamlined the whole process to get them the information they need,” Parker said. “They come here focused. They know why they’re here. They know what they want. We pave the way.”

Sorority sisters of Sigma Delta Tau at SUNY Oswego staff a table in the Campus Center concourse aimed at “Saving Sandy Survivors,” offering red remembrance pins for $1 each. From left are sophomore English major Kristyn Bednarczyk, senior business administration major and event coordinator Erin Walls, sophomore graphic design major Veronica DeFazio, and sophomore business administration majors Katie Mott and Becky Unger.

Campus rallies around Sandy victims

Sandy
Sorority sisters of Sigma Delta Tau at SUNY Oswego staff a table in the Campus Center concourse aimed at “Saving Sandy Survivors,” offering red remembrance pins for $1 each. From left are sophomore English major Kristyn Bednarczyk, senior business administration major and event coordinator Erin Walls, sophomore graphic design major Veronica DeFazio, and sophomore business administration majors Katie Mott and Becky Unger.

SUNY Oswego students have been working hard to plan and execute relief efforts to help those severely affected by Superstorm Sandy.

Graduate student Bailey Smith, inspired by her mother and uncle who set up a collection site at Long Beach on Long Island, sought the help of her fellow students to gather a rental van-load of food, water, winter clothing, batteries, blankets and more, and drove there the weekend of Nov. 10 and 11.

“It looks like the end of the world down there,” Smith said. “I think tears ran down my face from the moment we got there until the moment we left.”

Meanwhile, the spirit of compassion spread across campus in the wake of a hurricane turned superstorm that killed more than 110 people in 10 states, with New Jersey and Downstate New York the hardest hit.

President Deborah F. Stanley sent a letter of encouragement and strength to all Oswego alumni and their families. Sororities began efforts in the Campus Center to raise money for the storm’s victims — some of whom were families of their own members.

A fraternity organized a three-day can and food drive at a local grocery store. And staff of the Compass student success center, Campus Life and Residence Life and Housing, as well as students and other staff, met to plan a large fundraising event for Dec. 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

Additionally, John Halleron of the college’s Small Business Development Center plans to travel to New York City from Dec. 10 to 21 to assist small business owners in applying for disaster assistance.

The storm struck home for Sigma Delta Tau, as one of the sisters lost her family home. The sorority set up a table in the Campus Center, selling small red pins of remembrance for $1.

“We decided to make it for all victims of Sandy; we called it ‘Saving Sandy Survivors,’” said Erin Walls, a senior business administration major and coordinator of the sorority’s effort.

Alpha Sigma Chi turned out dozens of sisters in red sorority T-shirts to collect contributions at an adjacent table.

“We have a lot of sisters from Downstate — at least 10,” said sorority Vice President Stephanie Shannon. Immediately after it happened, she said, they knew they had to pitch in with fundraising.

Chelsea Flores of Alpha Sigma Chi, a junior from Rockaway Park in Queens, said the devastation —  from wind, water and fire — hit very close to home.

“The neighborhood is on a spit of land near Long Island,” Flores said. “We are so close to the beach, the water just went over the boardwalk and annihilated it.”

Her parents’ house had water in the basement and some damage to the front, but it was the loss of power for more than 10 days that persuaded her family to move in with a neighbor. “Everyone in Rockaway is trying to help each other,” she said.

Bayshore, Long Island, will receive food collected by Delta Sigma Phi fraternity at the Big M in Oswego.

“We have a lot of brothers downstate and it’s good to know that we can help out the area that is really affected and help those whose lives have turned upside down,” said fraternity member and junior chemistry major Joseph Starr.

For Bailey Smith, it meant a lot to act on this relief effort because many people will be recovering for a long time while those who were unaffected prepare for the holidays.

“We just have to make a conscious effort to not forget about them and continue giving them assistance,” Smith said.

SUNY Oswego senior Blake Wolcik of Mexico, a candidate for a bachelor of fine arts degree, works on a painting for the semester-ending BFA display opening along with the MA Thesis and Bachelor of Arts exhibitions from Nov. 30 to Dec. 12 in Tyler Hall.

SUNY Oswego BFA Exhibition to feature works of 14 student artists

SUNY Oswego
SUNY Oswego senior Blake Wolcik of Mexico, a candidate for a bachelor of fine arts degree, works on a painting for the semester-ending BFA display opening along with the MA Thesis and Bachelor of Arts exhibitions from Nov. 30 to Dec. 12 in Tyler Hall.

SUNY Oswego’s fall Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition will open Friday, Nov. 30, with a free public reception from 5 to 7 p.m. in Tyler Art Gallery.

The reception for the 14 BFA students will coincide with pre-exhibition festivities for four students displaying works in the Master of Arts Thesis Exhibition in the gallery. Both shows will run concurrently through Dec. 12 with the Bachelor of Arts Exhibition in Room 201 of Tyler Hall.

The BFA candidates include Jessica Brien of Syracuse, Joseph Donegan of the Bronx, Robert Engwer of Lake George, Andrea Grellman-Smith of Oswego, Steven Hanson of Adams, Alexandria Hough of Watertown, Siobhan Joyce of Levittown, Caitlin Kelley of Syracuse, Jordan Neville of Saratoga Springs, Nicholas Russell of Queensbury, Brittany Smart of Fulton, Chad Stewart of Baldwinsville, Angela Varos of Queensbury and Blake Wolcik of Mexico.

Eleven bachelor of arts candidates are eligible to display their artwork in the non-required BA Exhibition.

Bachelor of arts students pursue multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary studies in psychology, communications, marketing and other majors, in addition to art. BFA students participate in SUNY Oswego’s demanding and focused programs in studio art or graphic design.

SUNY Oswego also offers a master’s degree in art as well as a master’s in art teaching.

Tyler Art Galley is open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free, with donations appreciated. For more information, call 312-2112.

Parking at SUNY Oswego is by permit only. Gallery visitors may purchase — either online or at the college’s parking office near the main entrance on State Route 104 — a visitor permit to park in Lot E-18, the southern half of the lot behind Hart and Funnelle residence halls.

SUNY Oswego’s fall theatre department production “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure” will feature the deductive skills of the famed 19th century detective (played by Nicholas Pike, right) pitted against the machinations of the ruthless Professor Moriarty (Tyler Eldred).

SUNY Oswego to present taut, rapid-fire ‘Sherlock Holmes’ play

SUNY Oswego’s fall theatre department production “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure” will feature the deductive skills of the famed 19th century detective (played by Nicholas Pike, right) pitted against the machinations of the ruthless Professor Moriarty (Tyler Eldred).

Fast-paced suspense and intrigue will greet theatregoers for SUNY Oswego’s “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure” as a student cast and veteran director bring to life the brilliant detective, his sidekick and a savvy love interest.

With the Baker Street sleuth seeing a revival of interest thanks to the big-screen versions, BBC series “Sherlock” (seen stateside on PBS’ “Masterpiece Theatre”) and a new CBS show titled “Elementary,” Oswego’s version reaches back to the original material.

Based in part on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s books “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Final Problem,” the show will preview at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, and run at 8 p.m. Oct. 12, 13, 19 and 20, with a concluding matinee at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21.

All performances are at Waterman Theatre in SUNY Oswego’s Tyler Hall.

“Steven Dietz has adapted the 1897 play ‘Sherlock Holmes’ by Conan Doyle and William Gillette into a streamlined two-act version that preserves all the suspense and adventure of the original,” said Mark Cole, the director and a professor of theatre at SUNY Oswego. “Holmes and Watson pursue the nefarious Moriarty in order to save the reputation of the King of Bohemia.”

In the theatre department’s production, a crowned head of Europe tries desperately to retrieve an incriminating photograph on the eve of his marriage. Holmes (Nicholas Pike) unravels a blackmail scheme and pursues the villains, including Moriarty (Tyler Eldred), with the help of the faithful Dr. Watson (Jacob Luria), who also serves as narrator. Opera singer Irene Adler (Jennifer Pratt) plays Holmes’ one and only love, a woman caught at the center of the intrigue.

It’s ‘elementary’

Luria said he looks forward to portraying Holmes’ famed sidekick, who comes in and out of scenes to talk with the audience about the next stage in resolving the mystery.

“Now, people are seeing Sherlock Holmes on television and film, so it’s nice to bring this back to the stage and show that it’s just as exciting and mesmerizing,” he said.

The cast is working with dialect coach Joan Hart Willard, an adjunct instructor of acting and directing at SUNY Oswego, to master the various accents their roles demand.

“This is an iconic role that you kind of have to fit into, and it’s a struggle,” said Pike, who aims to deliver a stimulating take on Holmes. “But at the same time the challenge is super-exciting.”

The play will clip along, keeping audience members on the edge of their seats, Luria said.

“The show is very, very fast-paced and we change the scene a lot, but there’s no stopping point,” he said. “It’s energizing and exciting.”

Other cast members include Carlos Clemenz as the King of Bohemia; Sam Berman as Adler’s husband, Godfrey Norton; Michelle Strauss as Madge Larrabee; Josh Jarvi as Sid Prince; and Jesse Lessner, who plays both a policeman and a clergyman.

Tickets are available at all SUNY Oswego box offices, online at http://tickets.oswego.edu or by calling 312-2141. The production is suggested for ages 12 and above.

On the RISE – Tasked with encouraging and enabling undergraduate student research and creative projects, SUNY Oswego earth sciences faculty member Diana Boyer (center), director of the college’s year-old Office of Research and Individualized Student Experiences, talks in a Snygg Hall laboratory with senior biochemistry majors Ryan Cotroneo (left) and Adam Szymaniak, who worked this summer with Fehmi Damkaci of chemistry on a project to synthesize a compound library.

SUNY Oswego creates new office

On the RISE – Tasked with encouraging and enabling undergraduate student research and creative projects, SUNY Oswego earth sciences faculty member Diana Boyer (center), director of the college’s year-old Office of Research and Individualized Student Experiences, talks in a Snygg Hall laboratory with senior biochemistry majors Ryan Cotroneo (left) and Adam Szymaniak, who worked this summer with Fehmi Damkaci of chemistry on a project to synthesize a compound library.

SUNY Oswego has established an office to provide support and pique student interest in hands-on, faculty-mentored work.

Dr. Diana Boyer, an earth sciences faculty member and director of the Office of Research and Individualized Student Experiences, said the office aims to encourage and enable student scholarly work, internships and conference travel.

Personal experience tells Boyer this will pay dividends in student engagement, research and other academic skills, graduate school readiness and appeal to employers, she said.

“When I was in high school, I was given an amazing opportunity to work with a faculty member at Penn State, where I’m from,” said Boyer, who had a budding interest in paleontology. “I did a research project. I went out into the field, collected fossils, did the lab work, presented at a regional conference — and from that moment on I was hooked.”

RISE, headquartered in the SUNY Oswego Campus Center, can help students start a mentored research or artistic project, assist with funding and research travel through the college’s Scholarly and Creative Activities Committee and search for outside funding.

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Broadway star Kyle Dean Massey, currently playing Fiyero in “Wicked” on Broadway, will perform at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, at SUNY Oswego’s Sheldon Hall ballroom. His repertoire, titled “Eclectic Broadway,” largely will feature songs of the last 15 to 20 years on Broadway.

‘Wicked’ tenor to offer cabaret-style performance at SUNY Oswego

Broadway star Kyle Dean Massey, currently playing Fiyero in “Wicked” on Broadway, will perform at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, at SUNY Oswego’s Sheldon Hall ballroom. His repertoire, titled “Eclectic Broadway,” largely will feature songs of the last 15 to 20 years on Broadway.

“Wicked” Broadway star Kyle Dean Massey will sing hits from “Aladdin,” “Altar Boyz,” “Les Miserables” and even an original from his own senior recital in an appearance at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, at SUNY Oswego’s Sheldon Hall ballroom.

The tenor, currently playing romantic lead Fiyero in “Wicked” at the Gershwin Theatre, also is scheduled to join former mentor Todd Graber, his host and SUNY Oswego music department chair, for a duet from the play “Martin Guerre.”

Massey’s concert, titled “Eclectic Broadway,” kicks off the 2012-13 Ke-Nekt Chamber Music Series. Others in the series will include Symphony Syracuse Chamber Players, Ariel Quartet and Daedalus Quartet.

“I don’t think it’s such a stretch to have Kyle come in and sing a legitimate cabaret-style recital featuring music of the last 15 to 20 years that’s come on Broadway. It’s something we don’t get on campus very often,” Graber said.

He said that vocalists and soloists have found a place with chamber instrumentalists, including works of the most famous composers as well as musical theatre compositions.

Russell Miller of the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music will accompany Massey on piano.

The repertoire is set to feature such songs as “At the Fountain” from “Sweet Smell of Success,” “Something About You” from “Altar Boyz” and “Proud of Your Boy” from “Aladdin.”

Along with “On My Own” from “Les Miserables,” older songs in the performance likely will include “The Only Home I Know” from “Shenandoah” and “Use What You Know” from “The Life.”

Massey, Graber’s former voice student at Missouri State University, plans to meet with students at Oswego High School Monday, Sept. 17.

Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 18, he will conduct a master class at SUNY Oswego.

“It’s one of the things Kyle really likes to do,” Graber said. “He really likes going back to schools and sharing his journey with kids. He says you’re in such an isolated bowl in school and it (top-level performance) seems so distant and unattainable.”

Massey’s other credits include “Cupid” on ABC-TV, “Sex and the City 2” from HBO Films and the 62nd annual Tony Awards, as well as such plays as “Next to Normal,” “Xanadu” and “Altar Boyz.”

Tickets for Massey’s concert are available at all SUNY Oswego box offices, online at http://tickets.oswego.edu and by calling 315-312-2141.

Parking is available in campus lots for those attending this performance. Patrons with disabilities should call 312-2141 in advance for assistance.