Tag Archives: Roy Hodge

Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: May 19, 2012

Roy Hodge

by Roy Hodge

As I often do, I was playing a little mind game with myself recently as I was looking at the list of column ideas I have covered since I started writing for The Patriot in 1979. I decided it might be entertaining (to whom I don’t know) if I chose a topic of an earlier column and without looking at that column I could write a column on the same subject today.

The article I chose was one I wrote for the April 24, 1979 issue of The Patriot.

The topic was “Men’s Fashion.”  Okay, I’m sure that I’m as much an expert on that subject today as I was back in 1979.  That statement, loosely translated and explained, means that I didn’t know a lot then and I don’t know a lot — maybe even less — now.

Here, without first reading the 1979 article, is the column I wrote this week on the subject:

I guess I could be considered as a “conservative dresser.”  Although I do have some colorful, even “splashy” sports shirts, my wardrobe is usually a little laid back. I am retired now so I dress in the casual, maybe even a bit sloppy, fashion most of the time.

Back in 1979, if I was writing about men’s ties, I would probably mention that I wore one several times a week. I would probably say that back then I preferred a modest, not splashy tie, that I liked stripes and subdued not bold colors. I might have mentioned that I was quite casual, especially as the day wore on, loosening and re-loosening my tie.

Now, I would say that my taste in neckwear hasn’t changed much — except I hardly ever have to experience that taste. I still like modest stripes or solid colors. I prefer an in-between tie width, not really narrow and not wide enough to cover my shirt front. My tie-wearing experiences are quite limited these days.

In 1979, at work, I probably wore light colored short-sleeve shirts in warm weather; long-sleeve stripes or solids, often with sweaters over the shirt, in winter.

I have always enjoyed wearing sweaters during three seasons of the year. I used to wear sleeveless sweaters; I don’t wear them now. I have always preferred sports jackets to suits, but 10 or 15 pounds ago I had both.

Now that I don’t work my first choice is almost always a comfortable shirt or sweater, or both, in winter; in summer, a colorful sports shirt for dress-up and a T-shirt around the house and yard.

I often wore neat, gray slacks or clean, not worn or tattered chinos, to work. At home it may have been the more worn and tattered versions.

In 1979, I would have worn shorts at home or while running around doing errands in the summer. Now I wear whatever I put on in the morning during every season, chinos or jeans in the winter, shorts in the warm months and sneakers all year around.

There was a time — I think it was in the late 70’s — when fashion tastes went berserk and I followed along.

There were striped and plaid pants, outrageous colors, jackets without collars, very wide-legged to very narrow-legged trousers.

I’m glad to report that in a few years my fashion tastes, and almost everyone else’s, returned to normal, whatever that may have been.

Here is the column on “Men’s Fashion, 1979”:

Life was simpler once. For the important dress-up occasions I had a dark suit, a white shirt, two ties, a pair of dark socks and black shoes.

To read the rest of the column, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: May 12, 2012

Roy Hodge

by Roy Hodge

Adventures with Andrew – continued. Our little neighbor, Andrew, loves to come over to talk and “help” when I am in the garage, out in the yard, or in the gardens. He really likes to get in our house, and he knows it inch by inch, from top to bottom.

His special mission seems to be to touch, handle and move every object in every room of the house.

He has a special route which covers just about all of our living space. He knows exactly where he is going as soon as he comes in the back door. From there he works his way up to his ultimate destination which is the room upstairs where I keep my collection of toys.

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Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: May 5, 2012

Roy Hodge

by Roy Hodge

Not that I’m trying to forget them or anything like that, but I was taken back to my accordion days again this week when my mother-in-law sent me a clipping from “The Wall Street Journal” – a review of a book called “Squeeze This! A Cultural History of the Accordion in America” by Marion Jacobson.

In his review, author Ken Emerson noted, “Too low brow for classical music and too cornball for rock – not to mention too white-bread for jazz – the accordion gets no respect. So you’d think that a book devoted to the instrument would be as flat as a boxed set of Lawrence Welk’s ‘champagne  music.’

“But,” he continues, “Marion Jacobson’s ‘Squeeze This!’ bubbles over with fascinating information and intriguing insights.”

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Hodgepodge: April 28, 2012

Roy Hodge

by Roy Hodge

I started having a major problem a few weeks ago the minute I started thinking about what my favorite food might be. I knew immediately that I wasn’t going to come up with an instant, definite, no-doubt-about-it answer on the spot.

I get myself into these fantasy situations often, but I knew that a lot of thought was going to have to go into this decision.  Probably weeks, if not months of intense study and research would be necessary.

And, there couldn’t possibly be just one category to work on. In fact, as I thought more about it, I was sure that I would never be able to narrow my choice of favorite foods down to one.

After all, there is breakfast, lunch and dinner for starters.  There are snacks — mid-morning, mid-afternoon, before supper, before bed time, and don’t forget the middle of the night snack and the “I-can’t-sleep” snack.

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Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: April 21, 2012

Roy Hodge

by Roy Hodge

I was in the seventh grade at Theodore Roosevelt Junior High School in Syracuse when word was spreading that the world was going to end on a particular day that was coming up soon. Whoever was spreading the news even gave us a time: 11 a.m. I don’t know if it was Eastern time, Pacific time, daylight savings time, Howdy Doody time, or what.

Other than that, the bearers of the grim news didn’t furnish details – not any that I remembered anyway. I did know that I was supposed to be in Mr. McLaughlin’s study hall at 11 a.m. on that day. Mr. McLaughlin was a mechanical arts teacher, which translated to the fact that he taught shop.

I liked Mr. McLaughlin. He was a nice man, and besides being a teacher, he lived in my neighborhood, was very friendly and was generous to the neighborhood kids at Halloween.

In shop, he taught me to make a scissors holder and even though I thought it looked like a block of wood with a hole in it my grandmother let it hang on a wall in her kitchen for 20 years.

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Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: April 7, 2012

As soon as I started writing this column I realized that I had written about “comics” before.  But that didn’t stop me – I kept going.

The fact that I have found myself writing about the newspaper “funnies” a few times may say something about my choice of reading material, or what I like to do to get the day started – or end it, for that matter. But nonetheless, here is this year’s contribution:

I grew up having the newspaper’s “funnies” read to me, and then reading them myself. I remember spreading the Herald Journal’s comic pages out on the living room floor and no doubt making a mess of it before my father ever got to look at that section of the paper.

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Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: March 31, 2012

by Roy Hodge

Last week, while writing about the different kinds of mustard residing in our refrigerator, I thought of something while finishing the column.

I think of my mother as a really smart person in almost every thing she did – but there was one thing. She didn’t like mustard. The particular time I was thinking about happened on one of our trips to Heid’s when I was a kid.

Like the rest of us, my mother loved Heid’s hotdogs but she didn’t like mustard. I was remembering the time when she sent a couple of Heid’s employees on a quick mission looking for a bottle of ketchup. Back then, Heid’s didn’t feature French fries, so there was not a need for ketchup to slather on them, and anything but mustard on a Heid’s hotdog was unheard of.

And, while I was remembering, I thought about the wooden paddles that were used to spread that delicious spicy mustard from the full crocks at Heid’s on to our hotdogs.
Anyone else want to go to Heid’s?

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Roy Hodge

Hodgepodge: March 24, 2012

by Roy Hodge

“Why would anyone have eight kinds of mustard in their refrigerator?” asked the person who wasn’t looking for mustard.

“Eight, we only have eight!?” the only other person in the house exclaimed.  “We must have emptied the other five or six jars.”

Okay, let’s take a look at the mustard in our refrigerator.  When you open the door the first mustard you spot are the ones in the squeeze bottles.

They stand out because they are in the shelf on the inside door of the refrigerator, the bottles are larger, and in the case of French’s “Classic Yellow” mustard, the brightest.

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