Tag Archives: Oswego River

Water levels to be lowered along Oswego River

Brookfield Renewable Power will be lowering the water level along the Oswego River next week.

Brookfield will be lowering the water level behind the dam at Varick (between locks 6 and 7) approximately three feet below normal to replace flashboards on the dam and facilitate a regularly scheduled inspection  of the dam.

The water level will be lowered starting Tuesday, July 23 in preparation for work to be done that day. The water level will return to normal that afternoon.

Depending on the weather or flow condition, the flashboard repairs and dam inspection may be required to be cancelled and rescheduled for Wednesday, July 24.

In addition, Brookfield will be lowering the water level behind the dam at High Dam (between locks 5 and 6) approximately 1.5 feet below normal to replace flashboards on the dam and for the City of Oswego to conduct a dam inspection.

The water level will be lowered starting Thursday, July 25 in preparation for work to be done that day. The water level will return to normal the afternoon of Friday, July 26.

Depending on the weather or flow condition, the flashboard repairs and dam inspection may be required to be cancelled and rescheduled for Friday, July 26.

Lastly, Brookfield will be lowering the water level behind the dam at Minetto (lock 5) approximately 1.5 feet below normal to replace flashboards on the dam.

The water level will be lowered starting Tuesday, July 30 in preparation for work to be done that day. The water level will return to normal that afternoon.

Depending on the weather or flow condition, the flashboard repairs and dam inspection may be required to be cancelled and rescheduled for Wednesday, July 31.

WaterChestnuts1

County to once again attack water chestnut plants

Water chestnuts – Daniel Paro (left) pulls water chestnuts from his kayak while Oswego County Legislator Shawn Doyle searches for the invasive plant on the Salmon River Estuary. Doyle is riding in a driftboat with Dave Paro of Dave’s Executive Guide Service. Volunteers, including members of the Oswego County River Guides Association, will hold their annual water chestnut hand-pull Saturday, July 13 on the Salmon River Estuary.
Water chestnuts – Daniel Paro (left) pulls water chestnuts from his kayak while Oswego County Legislator Shawn Doyle searches for the invasive plant on the Salmon River Estuary. Doyle is riding in a driftboat with Dave Paro of Dave’s Executive Guide Service. Volunteers, including members of the Oswego County River Guides Association, will hold their annual water chestnut hand-pull Saturday, July 13 on the Salmon River Estuary.

by Andrew Henderson

The Oswego County Water and Soil Conservation District is once again going to attack invasive plants, including the water chestnut plant, along the Oswego River this summer.

 

“The water chestnut plant is an invasive species that, once established, can significantly reduce the quality of the native habitat, impede recreational use of waterways, and interfere with terrestrial ecosystems,” said John DeHollander, district manager of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District.

“Water chestnut is present in shallow areas of the lower Salmon River Estuary as well as in sections of the Oswego River.”

It is difficult to slow the spread of water chestnut once it becomes established in a shallow water area. Volunteers have successfully led hand-pull efforts over the past several summers to remove the plant from sections of the Oswego River as well as the Salmon River Estuary.

The plants can create large floating mats of vegetation that restrict the penetration of sunlight, limit the growth of native plants, and disrupt the food web. Each water chestnut plant can produce up to 300 nuts per year.

The Soil and Water Conservation District applied a chemical treatment to more than 200 acres of water chestnut plants on the Oswego River last year. The agency plans to use a chemical treatment on the Oswego River again this summer.

Up north, volunteers, river guides, and members of local environmental organizations will gather Saturday, July 13 at the Pine Grove Boat Launch near Selkirk Shores State Park for a community water chestnut pull on the Salmon River Estuary.  From 8:30 to 9:15 a.m., members of the St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership for Regional Invasive Species will lead a session on how to identify common invasive species and monitor their presence in waterways and on land.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or call 598-6397 to for subscription information

 

 

 

From July 18 through July 22, five Central New York paddlers, including former Oswego County Planning Director Ed Marx, traveled water routes from Ithaca to Oswego, promoting the potential for developing a water trail corridor that links the Finger Lakes with Lake Ontario.

Five paddlers make their way from Ithaca to Oswego

From July 18 through July 22, five Central New York paddlers, including former Oswego County Planning Director Ed Marx, traveled water routes from Ithaca to Oswego, promoting the potential for developing a water trail corridor that links the Finger Lakes with Lake Ontario.

From July 18 through July 22,  five Central New York paddlers, including former Oswego County Planning Director Ed Marx, traveled water routes from Ithaca to Oswego promoting the potential for developing a water trail corridor, that links the Finger Lakes with Lake Ontario.

Traveling with Marx, who is now commissioner of planning for Tompkins County, were Andrew Zepp, executive director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust; Chris Olney, director of stewardship of the Finger Lakes Land Trust; Geoff Milz, senior planner for Cayuga County; and Sue Poelvoorde, senior natural resources planner for New York State Parks.

The paddling group of conservationists and promoters of tourism enjoyed their trip exploring the history and historic areas of the Oswego River on their way to Oswego. They were joined by other local paddlers along the way.

One of their first stops on the Oswego River and Canal was at Great Bear Recreational Area Saturday, where they appreciated the natural beauty of its resources.

In addition, Marx met with the Minetto River View Park volunteers. He was able to view and comment how nicely the park has developed since his work in gaining the grant for its construction.

The paddlers finished their voyage with a barbecue and reception at Wright’s Landing.  Oswego Mayor Thomas Gillan greeted the paddlers and endorsed the potential for developing a water trail that links the Finger Lakes with Lake Ontario, utilizing the Seneca and Oswego Rivers.

Valley Viewpoints: Water chestnuts

by James Karasek, County Legislator

I would like to respond to a Valley Viewpoint about the spraying of the invasive weeds on the Oswego River.

First, each homeowner along the river should have received a letter from Soil and Water in regards to the treatment of the water chestnuts this year. Yes, there will be a round of treatment applied this year.

Soil and Water informed me that they have switched the chemical to be used and there was an approval process that took longer than planned.

The process should begin at the end of this month.

New this year is that we are working with Onondaga County in this treatment and that will hopefully be a better attack with the water chestnuts not moving from one county to the other.

Soil and Water has requested that if you have any questions on this year’s program to contact them. The number for Soil and Water is 592-9663 and the e mail is: infotmation@oswegosoilandwater.com.

As always, if I can be of assistance in answering any questions please contact me.

Water chestnut – Water chestnuts can form a thick mass of vegetation, limiting fishing and water recreation activities, once it is established in a shallow water area. Pulling is effective before they become established in a body of water.

Groups plan water chestnut pull in Oswego County rivers

Water chestnut – Water chestnuts can form a thick mass of vegetation, limiting fishing and water recreation activities, once it is established in a shallow water area. Pulling is effective before they become established in a body of water.

Several volunteers, conservation organizations and angler groups have worked together over the past few years to help slow the spread of water chestnuts in Oswego County rivers.

Headed by the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District, the groups will hold a water chestnut pull at Port Ontario Saturday, July 14.

An invasive species, the water chestnut plant can be difficult to control once it is established in a body of water. The plants can create large floating mats of vegetation that restrict the penetration of sunlight, limit the growth of native plants, and disrupt the food web.

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Lake Neatahwanta

Lake Neatahwanta funding included in state budget

by Andrew Henderson

Lake NeatahwantaThe new state budget will include funding to help with the cleanup of Lake Neatahwanta, according to Senator Patty Ritchie.

In addition, the budget includes funding to battle water chestnuts in the Oswego River.

Ritchie said she secured the funding, which was included in the budget agreement announced Monday.

“Local communities, outdoorsmen and people who enjoy the open waters of Central and Northern New York have been working for years to help improve quality and access to these waters, which are among the most beautiful in the world, and key to the preservation and growth of new jobs through tourism and increased enjoyment by the public,” Ritchie said.

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