Tag Archives: Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd

WarOnSynthetics1

State legislation aimed at improving synthetic drugs laws

Pictured is the Woolson family of Baldwinsville standing at a press conference held Tuesday in Oswego. They lost a loved one due to injuries related to synthetic drug use and support legislation that would close legal loopholes regarding synthetics.
Pictured is the Woolson family of Baldwinsville standing at a press conference held Tuesday in Oswego. They lost a loved one due to injuries related to synthetic drug use and support legislation that would close legal loopholes regarding synthetics.

by Nicole Reitz

A press conference was held Tuesday outside of the Oswego County Public Safety Building to discuss proposed legislation aimed at improving laws related to synthetic drugs.

Assemblyman Will Barclay spoke of a new comprehensive legislation that would increase penalties, penalize chemical swapping, mislabeling and other proposed charges.

Barlcay and Senator Patty Ritchie’s bill would also penalize both dealers and users of synthetics.

The legislation defines a synthetic drug as any substance that affects a person’s cannabinoid receptor.

The cannabinoid receptors language in the legislation pinpoints the affect the drug has on a person, rather than naming actual substances.

Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd said that while the use of synthetics has definitely decreased in Oswego County, these drugs are typically sold as other products, such as bath salts, shoe powder and incense.

“You still have a certain amount of people that want to make a buck and not have to work for it, and they prey on the vulnerable,” said Todd. “Having this law in place would allow us to act faster when a new drug comes on the scene and better protect the public.”

Police approaching a scene put themselves in danger because of the users’ erratic behaviors. Users can hallucinate, become extremely agitated, paranoid and violent — sometimes for days.

Todd said that those under the influence of synthetics also have a “terrific ability to mask pain,” and can withstand taser guns and pepper spray.

The reaction of the people taking these poisons also make the jobs of health-care professionals more difficult. Unlike more common street drugs, nurses and doctors do not know the chemical makeup of these drugs, making it hard to treat users symptoms.

Often the abusers of these agents do not realize or anticipate the intensity of symptoms that are produced from these drugs.

One of these people is the late Victor Woolson of Baldwinsville, who died last August of injuries sustained from a synthetic drug called Avalanche.

Woolson purchased it in Oswego on a store shelve, which he falsely believed to be a legal and safe alternative to real drugs.

The Woolson family was at the press conference, holding signs in remembrance of Victor.

The family advocates for strengthening laws regarding synthetics to prevent further addiction and deaths. Victor died after federal legislation and the New York Department of Health ban was put in place.

Teresa Woolson, Victor’s mother, knows that improving the law will help the problem of synthetic drug use in the county.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

710792081

Sheriff’s association responds to new gun-control legislation

71079208by Andrew Henderson

Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd has joined sheriffs from across the state in expressing their concern with the recently adopted New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act of 2013 (NY SAFE ACT).

The New York State Sheriff’s Association recently presented its response to the SAFE Act, which was quickly adopted by the state legislature and approved by Governor Andrew Coumo.

“After extensive meetings with the majority of the sheriffs of New York State we have released our position as to the NYS SAFE ACT proposed by Gov. Cuomo,” said Todd. “This is a position which encompassed much debate for a number of days to form what we feel is a concerted belief to protect the lives of our children and our citizens as well as to protect the rights of legitimate and honest gun owners.”

The association has identified six provisions of the law that it believes are helpful and will increase safety. On the other hand, the association has identified eight provisions that need clarification as well as revision. The state sheriffs applaud the following six provisions:

• Restriction on FOIL requests about pistol permit holders. By granting citizens the option of having their names and addresses withheld from public disclosure, the new law does provide a mechanism to allow people to decide for themselves whether their personal information should be accessible to the public.

“We believe, however, that no one should have to explain why their personal information should remain confidential,” the association stated. “A better procedure, we believe, is simply to exempt all this personal information from FOIL disclosure.

• Killing of emergency first responders. The new law makes killing of emergency first responders aggravated or first degree murder, enhancing penalties for this crime and requiring life without parole.

• Requirement of NICS checks for private sales (except between immediate family).

• Comprehensive review of mental health records before firearms permits are granted and review of records to determine if revocation of permits is required. The new law imposes reporting requirements on many mental health care professionals and others who may make a determination that a person is a danger to himself or others.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

Sheriff Todd responds to new gun law

by Carol Thompson

“What is it?” Oswego County Sheriff Reuel “Moe” Todd asked when how he felt about the new gun control legislation signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo just after 5 p.m. Tuesday.

Todd, as with other sheriffs around the state, are baffled by the vagueness of the law and what it will mean for their departments.

“Nobody seems to know exactly what this (law) means,” he said.

Citing one section of the law that refers to semi-automatic weapons, but not the clips, Todd asked, “Can you sell the clips that you have?”

New York State passed the toughest gun control law in the nation. State lawmakers passed the law just two days after Cuomo issued an order suspending the three-day public review period.

Todd said as far as he is aware, the law does not address how residents will register with the police.

The sheriff noted it could be one more cost passed down from the state onto local governments.

“Is that just going to be one more thing that we get shoved at us that we have to pay for?” he asked. “That’s going to be a lot of work.”

Todd said state representatives passed the legislation without seeking opinions of those they should.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397