Tag Archives: NY SAFE ACT

Barclay calls Hollywood gun amendment a ‘joke’

by Andrew Henderson

Governor Andrew Cuomo made the first amendment to the controversial NY SAFE Act last week. It was an amendment that Assemblyman Will Barclay called a “joke.”

The governor’s first amendment to the controversial gun-control legislation allows Hollywood productions to continue using the weapons banned by the legislation.

Barclay has expressed concern that the first amendment to this ill-conceived measure failed to address the restrictions banning law enforcement officers from entering school property as well as the legitimate concerns of law-abiding sportsmen and gun owners.

“(Last week), we saw nearly 10,000 law-abiding sportsmen, law enforcement officers and law-abiding gun owners rally together for their right to bear arms,” Barclay said about Thursday’s rally in Albany. “Rather than address their concerns and the many flaws in the NY SAFE Act, the governor has decided that the needs of Hollywood producers supersedes the needs of our residents and law enforcement officers.

“It’s more evident with each passing day that the NY SAFE Act needs to be repealed,” Barclay added. “I urge the governor to take action and eliminate this measure that does little to address the root causes of violence and illegal firearm use, while infringing on the constitutional right of all responsible New Yorkers.”

Recently, members of the Oswego County Legislature approved a resolution urging the state to repeal its recently adopted NY Safe Act.

Oswego County was one of 50 counties to have proposed or passed resolutions seeking its repeal.

The new law requires criminal background checks on the sale of ammunition, requires five-year renewals on pistol permits, and changes mental health reporting requirements.

Those mandates will be costly to the county, the legislators claim in their memorializing resolution. The legislation outlines a stricter definition of assault weapons and implements an immediate ban of defined assault weapons.

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County adopts resolution calling for repeal of gun law

by Andrew Henderson

By an unanimous vote, members of the Oswego County Legislature approved a resolution Thursday afternoon urging the state to repeal its recently adopted NY Safe Act.

The new law requires criminal background checks on the sale of ammunition, requires five-year renewals on pistol permits, and changes mental health reporting requirements. Those mandates will be costly to the county, the legislators claim in their memorializing resolution.

The legislation outlines a stricter definition of assault weapons and implements an immediate ban of defined assault weapons.

Three people from the public spoke about the issue during a public hearing. All three of them were against the gun-control law.

Rick McDermott, who said he was a representative “of many sportsman organizations throughout the state and county,” said he supports the repealing of the state law.

“The Constitution allows us the right to keep and bear arms for many more reasons than what was stated by the governor in his State of the State speech,” said McDermott. “It is not about hunting. It is not about target shooting. It is about defending our rights and a free America.”

McDermott said that many people do not realize that the New York Civil Rights Law reads almost identical to the Constitution. The New York Civil Rights Law includes the right to bear arms.

“The governor has violated the constitution of the state of New York,” he said. “It’s not about seven rounds in a gun or to deer hunt, it’s about our freedom and our right to protect ourselves.”

McDermott also noted that the gun-control law was passed “in the dark of the night.”

Following the approval of the legislation, the governor reportedly said, “I couldn’t wait for three days. I had to act while I had the votes,” McDermott relayed.

This maneuver reportedly violated New York’s constitution, which states that legislation must be available for three days before a vote is taken.

“The governor clearly thinks that he is above the constitution of this state,” McDermott said. “We the people need to address that with him.”

Sheriff Reuel Todd also spoke and said that as a citizen, he is a gun owner.

“The Constitution itself was not written in three days,” he said. “There is no reason overnight to trample it.”

The sheriff reminded the legislature and members of the public of the recent events in California where a “cop gone bad” had a shoot out with police.

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SecondAmendment1

Large crowd takes aim at NY SAFE Act

A crowd gathered at the Oswego Armory to hear about the NY SAFE Act. Many responsible gun owners were concerned that the law stifled their Second Amendment rights. The audience was able to ask specific questions about the law and voice their concerns and displeasure. Those with unanswered questions were directed to call the NY SAFE Act hotline at 1-855-LAW-GUNS.
A crowd gathered at the Oswego Armory to hear about the NY SAFE Act. Many responsible gun owners were concerned that the law stifled their Second Amendment rights. The audience was able to ask specific questions about the law and voice their concerns and displeasure. Those with unanswered questions were directed to call the NY SAFE Act hotline at 1-855-LAW-GUNS.

by Nicole Reitz

The Oswego Armory hosted a public meeting Wednesday where officials from two state agencies answered questions about the new NY Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act (NY SAFE Act).

Michael C. Green, executive deputy commissioner of the Division of Criminal Justice Services, and Steve Hogan, first deputy counsel for the state police, came prepared to explain what is covered under the NY SAFE ACT, which was recently signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The presentation began with a definition of an assault weapon, as defined by the state legislature in the legislation. Any pump, lever or bolt action shotgun or rifle by definition can not be an assault weapon, and does not be registered.

“The vast majority of guns do not constitute as assault weapons under this statue,” said Green.

An assault rifle is classified as a semi-automatic rifle able to accept a detachable magazine. It also needs to have one or more of these characteristics: a folding or telescoping stock, a second hand grip or protruding grip that can be held by the non-trigger hand, a bayonet mount, or a threaded barrel capable of accommodating a flash suppressor, muzzle break or muzzle compensator.

For a shotgun or pistol to be considered an assault weapon, it needs to again be semiautomatic and an have an ability to accept a detachable magazine.

Green explained how the law affects current owners of these weapons.

“If you have a weapon that is classified as an assault weapon under this statue, if you lawfully owned that weapon the day before the statue was passed, you can keep that gun,” said Green. “This law doesn’t say that you have to give that gun up.

“If you want to keep the assault weapon, you need to register it,” he added. “Once you register, you are still lawfully in possession of that gun”

The free registration process is through the State Police, beginning in mid March. Registration is available online and there is also a paper option. Assault weapons possessed before Jan. 15 must be registered within in a year and re-certified every five years.

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Reaction to state’s new gun control law

by Andrew Henderson

Local state representatives blasted the gun-control legislation that was adopted by the state legislature and signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo this week.

The legislation, which was hastily approved by both houses without any input from the public, infringes on residents’ Constitutional right to bear arms, Oswego County’s state representatives said.

The New York State Senate approved the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act of 2013 (NY SAFE ACT) Monday.

While she praised some parts of the legislation, Senator Patty Ritchie voted against the bill because it infringes on the Second Amendment.  “It is also clear to me that attempts to restrict legal ownership and possession of firearms from responsible sportsmen — rather than focusing on criminals — will not enhance the safety of our communities and deprives law-abiding citizens of an important right under the Constitution of the United States,” Ritchie said.

“It is for that reason, and based on the many hundreds of sportsmen and constituents I represent, who contacted my office to urge me to oppose this legislation, that I chose to vote no on this legislation,” she added.

The NY SAFE ACT was adopted in light of the recent shootings in Webster and Newton, Conn.

New York is now the first state in the nation to completely ban all pre-1994 high capacity magazines, ban any magazine that can hold over seven rounds (down from a limit of 10), and conduct real time background checks of ammunition purchases in order to alert law enforcement of high volume buyers.

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