Tag Archives: Lake Neatahwanta

LakeFundraiser1

Local businesses join lake restoration effort

Lake restoration effort – Local merchants are helping the effort to restore Lake Neatahwanta. This Monday, many local businesses will be offering $1 donation cards — in the shape of Lake Neatahwanta — in order to raise local funds for the cleanup to begin. Pictured are Mayor Ron Woodward and Second Ward Councilor Dan Knopp who were the first to make a donation.
Lake restoration effort – Local merchants are helping the effort to restore Lake Neatahwanta. This Monday, many local businesses will be offering $1 donation cards — in the shape of Lake Neatahwanta — in order to raise local funds for the cleanup to begin. Pictured are Mayor Ron Woodward and Second Ward Councilor Dan Knopp who were the first to make a donation.

by Andrew Henderson

Local merchants are helping the effort to restore Lake Neatahwanta.

This Monday, many local businesses will be offering $1 donation cards — in the shape of Lake Neatahwanta — in order to raise local funds for the cleanup to begin.

Second Ward Councilman Dan Knopp presented the idea to the Fulton Community Revitalization Project Board.

The Lake Neatahwanta Revitalization Project will be partially funded by a grant from Senator Patty Ritchie and other private donors.

“Every member of our community can show their own support by donating $1 to this very important project,” said Knopp. “Just sign your name, your family’s name or just write a note of encouragement. Your personal donation will be displayed by the businesses to show your support for the lake cleanup.”

All contributions will go directly to the restoration of Lake Neatahwanta.

The city recently partnered with the Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation to begin a comprehensive restoration project.

When completed, it will enhance the area’s tourism, economic development, and recreation opportunities for the community, Mayor Ron Woodward said.

 

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or call 598-6397 to subscribe

 

Thanks for the lake support

I want to thank all of the Lake Neatahwanta Committee members and others who donated not only food and supplies but also their time to make the chicken barbecue on May 11 a huge success.

The committee will continue to seek grants and donations and hope to see a clean lake become a reality.

Many thanks again to all who put their change and bills in the collection boxes.

Ed Williamson

Granby

Fulton partners with Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation

The City of Fulton has partnered with the Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation to soon begin a comprehensive restoration project of Lake Neatahwanta. The theme of their project is: “It’s a Great Lake!”
The City of Fulton has partnered with the Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation to soon begin a comprehensive restoration project of Lake Neatahwanta. The theme of their project is: “It’s a Great Lake!”

The City of Fulton has partnered with the Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation to begin a comprehensive restoration project of Lake Neatahwanta, according to Fulton Mayor Ronald Woodward.

When completed, it will enhance the area’s tourism, economic development, and recreation opportunities for the community, he said.

“The theme of our project is ‘It’s a Great Lake!’ and we believe it can be fully restored to its former beauty with this project,” Woodward said.

“Once completed, members of the Fulton area will be proud to say that Lake Neatahwanta is part of their community and it will be an even greater draw for a multitude of activities.

“The goal is to make Lake Neatahwanta fully usable again for swimming, fishing, boating, and other events,” he added. “The restoration project will include a systematic hydraulic dredging schedule that will remove layers of sediment that have been accumulating over many years. A short time after we begin dredging, residents will see an immediate improvement in water clarity.

“The sediment that is removed from dredging will be pumped into cylindrical slotted plastic sleeves called Geotubes on the shore,” the mayor continued. “The clean water drains out of the tubes and runs back into the lake and the sediment compacts as it dries. The remaining solids are marketable as a fertilizer. Any returns from the sale of the dewatered sediment will go directly back into the revitalization project.

“All aspects of the project will have DEC approval and overview and it is tentatively scheduled to run from July to October this year and for several years in the future. Our first priority will be to restore beach areas and shore fronts so our community can enjoy these areas and treasure them.”

The Fulton Community Revitalization Corporation is accepting donations for project funding. There are donation levels for every budget, Woodward said, and donors will be acknowledged in a quarterly report that outlines the process, plans, and schedules to meet objectives.

In addition, a brochure was created that outlines the project and answers some frequently asked questions.

For this free brochure and further information on the project, interested persons may call Woodward at 592-7330 or Joseph Fiumara, executive director of Fulton Community Development at 593-7166.

A McGrath & Associates Carp Angling Services employee holds a large catfish hooked by Fulton’s Rebecca Bailey (center) and reeled in by Jakob Burghardt, also of Fulton.

Kids fishing class held at Fulton’s Lake Neatahwanta

A McGrath & Associates Carp Angling Services employee holds a large catfish hooked by Fulton’s Rebecca Bailey (center) and reeled in by Jakob Burghardt, also of Fulton.

A kids fishing class was held Aug. 18. Twenty-two children participated in the class, which was held at Lake Neatahwanta on Fulton’s west side.

The class was sponsored by local fishing author Spider Rybaak and McGrath & Associates Carp Angling Services.

Mike McGrath, billed as the most knowledgeable carp expert on the East Coast, held several children and their parents captive for an hour, explaining and demonstrating carp subjects, including  knots and terminal tackle to habitat preferences, mixing chum (grains, syrups and Marukyu Japanese bait) and seeding it into the water to draw the fish close to shore.

After his course in theory, McGrath led the kids to a spot on the lake, cast out several lines and began catching carp ranging from 7 to 15 pounds and a couple channel catfish running from 4 to 8 pounds.

Meanwhile, Spider was teaching kids how to fish with lures and worms.

Nightcrawlers  were the bait of choice in the beginning, but the supply ran out after a couple hours and the students began using the Atomic Teasers, Ripple Shad and Honey Worm PowerBaits Spider handed out earlier, catching bluegills and white perch on the Berkley lures.

Loaner Shakespeare Classic rod and reel combos were available for the day for kids who didn’t have their own fishing equipment.

Spider and McGrath will hold another fishing class on Lake Neatahwanta, September 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Those seeking more information may contact McGrath at mmcgrath2@twcny.rr.com or 882-1549.

Wal-MartDonation

Wal-Mart assists lake effort

Granby Wal-Mart Manager Mike Hardesty presents a check to Ed Williamson, chairman of the Lake Committee for the Cleanup of Lake Neatahwanta and Granby Town supervisor. The money from Wal-Mart will be used to create a plan to help diminish the cause of the phosphorus-filled lake.

by Andrew Henderson

Wal-Mart donated $2,000 earlier this week to the Lake Committee for the Cleanup of Lake Neatahwanta.

The committee is currently raising funds and lobbying state and federal officials for money to dredge the lake, which is filled with high-levels of phosphorus and most likely contains blue-green algae.

Committee Chairman Ed Williamson, who is also the Granby Town supervisor, said Tuesday that the money from Wal-Mart will be used to create a plan to diminish the cause of the problem.

The lake is fed by three streams, including Sheldon Creek, which is said to be the cause of 70 percent of the sediment that lies on the lake bottom.

“We have to stop it in order to fix it,” said Williamson. “There is no use dredging the lake if the problem still exists.”

Williamson noted that many farms surrounding the lake are not as active as before, which could help with the problem.

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

City continues to lobby officials for lake money

by Andrew Henderson

Slowly but surely, the movement to clean up Lake Neatahwanta is progressing.

During Tuesday’s meeting of the Fulton Common Council, resident Brad Warner asked for an update on the lake committee’s progress.

Mayor Ron Woodward said the committee is still gathering signatures to present to government officials in order to secure funding to dredge the lake.

The committee is also looking into becoming a 501c tax-exempt association in order to raise money from private organizations and the public for the cleanup effort.

Warner suggested that fund-raisers, including a concert, could be held to help raise money for the phosphorous-filled lake. The committee, however, will first have to become a non-profit agency.

The lake is fed by three streams, including Sheldon Creek, which is said to be the cause of 70 percent of the sediment that lies on the lake bottom.

The blue-green algae in the lake is contributed to the warmth of the shallower water and fecal matter from Canadian Geese and fish. The lake, once 16 feet deep, is now only about eight feet deep at its deepest point.

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Valley Viewpoints: Save the lake

by Edward Williamson, Committee Chairman

It is the mission of the new Lake Neatahwanta Committee to clean-up and re-vitalize the lake so it can be used by residents of Central New York, visitors and local community.

This mission statement was developed by Jim Karasek, a local resident and legislator representing a portion of Fulton and Granby.

“The little lake near the great lake” so named Neatahwanta is a 750 acre lake that is jointly shared by the Town of Granby and the City of Fulton. In previous times, the lake shared its life as a source of water, fish and recreation. In years hence the lake has turned its face away from those resources due to neglect, abuse and pollution. The lake committee is charged with the task of restoring the health and vitality to Lake Neatahwanta. Recognizing and supporting that the lake is a living breathing element necessary to the communities that share shorelines, the lake committee under-takes the restoration of returning life back to “The little lake near the great lake.”

Please join the committee in its efforts to clean-up the lake.

Granby Town Supervisor Ed Williamson (left) and Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) held a meeting Wednesday at the Fulton War Memorial to discuss the restoration of Lake Neatahwanta. Local officials and representatives from state Senator Patty Ritchie and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand attended the meeting.

Restoring Fulton’s Lake Neatahwanta

Granby Town Supervisor Ed Williamson (left) and Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) held a meeting Wednesday at the Fulton War Memorial to discuss the restoration of Lake Neatahwanta. Local officials and representatives from the state Senator's office attended the meeting.

by Nicole Reitz

If interest alone was enough, Fulton would already have restored Lake Neatahwanta to its former glory.

Granby Town Supervisor Ed Williamson and Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward held a meeting Wednesday at the Fulton War Memorial to discuss cleaning up Lake Neatahwanta and making it swimmable again.

Local officials, including representatives from state Senator Patty Ritchie and U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s office, were met by an audience of Fulton residents — almost entirely made up of baby boomers and seniors.

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