Tag Archives: John DeHollander

WaterChestnuts1

County to once again attack water chestnut plants

Water chestnuts – Daniel Paro (left) pulls water chestnuts from his kayak while Oswego County Legislator Shawn Doyle searches for the invasive plant on the Salmon River Estuary. Doyle is riding in a driftboat with Dave Paro of Dave’s Executive Guide Service. Volunteers, including members of the Oswego County River Guides Association, will hold their annual water chestnut hand-pull Saturday, July 13 on the Salmon River Estuary.
Water chestnuts – Daniel Paro (left) pulls water chestnuts from his kayak while Oswego County Legislator Shawn Doyle searches for the invasive plant on the Salmon River Estuary. Doyle is riding in a driftboat with Dave Paro of Dave’s Executive Guide Service. Volunteers, including members of the Oswego County River Guides Association, will hold their annual water chestnut hand-pull Saturday, July 13 on the Salmon River Estuary.

by Andrew Henderson

The Oswego County Water and Soil Conservation District is once again going to attack invasive plants, including the water chestnut plant, along the Oswego River this summer.

 

“The water chestnut plant is an invasive species that, once established, can significantly reduce the quality of the native habitat, impede recreational use of waterways, and interfere with terrestrial ecosystems,” said John DeHollander, district manager of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District.

“Water chestnut is present in shallow areas of the lower Salmon River Estuary as well as in sections of the Oswego River.”

It is difficult to slow the spread of water chestnut once it becomes established in a shallow water area. Volunteers have successfully led hand-pull efforts over the past several summers to remove the plant from sections of the Oswego River as well as the Salmon River Estuary.

The plants can create large floating mats of vegetation that restrict the penetration of sunlight, limit the growth of native plants, and disrupt the food web. Each water chestnut plant can produce up to 300 nuts per year.

The Soil and Water Conservation District applied a chemical treatment to more than 200 acres of water chestnut plants on the Oswego River last year. The agency plans to use a chemical treatment on the Oswego River again this summer.

Up north, volunteers, river guides, and members of local environmental organizations will gather Saturday, July 13 at the Pine Grove Boat Launch near Selkirk Shores State Park for a community water chestnut pull on the Salmon River Estuary.  From 8:30 to 9:15 a.m., members of the St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership for Regional Invasive Species will lead a session on how to identify common invasive species and monitor their presence in waterways and on land.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or call 598-6397 to for subscription information

 

 

 

Mosquito dunk kits still available

by Carol Thompson

The mosquito dunk kits, provided by the state, are not flying off the shelves as anticipated.

“We’re surprised they are lasting as long as they are,” said John DeHollander, district manager of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District.

The kits are now available once again at the Soil and Water Conservation District office.  They are also offered at the New Haven, Hastings and West Monroe town halls.

Those locations were selected because it is the area of the county with the greatest mosquito problem. Despite that, requests have been slow.

“We based (the locations) on last year’s outbreak,” he said. “I don’t know why people aren’t picking them up.”

As of Wednesday afternoon, New Haven had two cases of the mosquito larvicide kits left. DeHollander said some of the kits from the towns were brought back to the Soil and Water office.

Other counties have reported little interest in the kits.

Less than 100 people in Onondaga County have reportedly picked up the dunk pouches despite the number of pools found to be infected with West Nile virus.

DeHollander noted that there is a resurgence of interest in the kits after newspaper articles about mosquito problems are published.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of the Valley News at our office or at one of several locations throughout the City. For Subscriptions call 598-6397.
Water chestnut – Water chestnuts can form a thick mass of vegetation, limiting fishing and water recreation activities, once it is established in a shallow water area. Pulling is effective before they become established in a body of water.

Groups plan water chestnut pull in Oswego County rivers

Water chestnut – Water chestnuts can form a thick mass of vegetation, limiting fishing and water recreation activities, once it is established in a shallow water area. Pulling is effective before they become established in a body of water.

Several volunteers, conservation organizations and angler groups have worked together over the past few years to help slow the spread of water chestnuts in Oswego County rivers.

Headed by the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District, the groups will hold a water chestnut pull at Port Ontario Saturday, July 14.

An invasive species, the water chestnut plant can be difficult to control once it is established in a body of water. The plants can create large floating mats of vegetation that restrict the penetration of sunlight, limit the growth of native plants, and disrupt the food web.

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