Tag Archives: Jesus

Jesus’ incarnation

by Pastor David Grey

“Christ Jesus: Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be grasped,  but made himself nothing, taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness.” — Philippians 2:6

The birth of Messiah, born in Bethlehem to the virgin Mary by the Holy Spirit, gave mankind a baby like no other — a baby who was both fully God and fully man. Incarnation. Though the word does not appear in scripture, it comes from two Latin words, “in” and “caro” (which means flesh). Together they mean “clothed in flesh.” This is exactly what the passage in Philippians says…that God the Son came in flesh.

C.S. Lewis wrote, “The Incarnation, when God became man, was the central event in the very history of the world…the thing that the whole story has been about.”

How true. From the vantage point of God who created all things; who is king of kings and lord of lords, all of history hinges on this pivotal point of the incarnation. The hinge of history is the time Jesus lived and walked among us in the flesh.

Even our calendar is arranged in acknowledgment. Everything prior to the incarnation is referred to as BC (before Christ) and everything following His birth is known as AD, Anno Domini, the Year of our Lord.

Without the incarnation of God, Himself, the whole story of mankind,  our separation from God and our own inability to ever be restored, has an inconceivably sad ending.

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Light in the Darkness: March 7, 2012

by Pastor David Grey

“You don’t have enough faith,” Jesus told them. “I tell you the truth, if you had faith even as small as a mustard seed, you could say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it would move. Nothing would be impossible.” — Matthew 17:20

Bishop Primus of The Evangelical Orthodox Catholic Church in America wrote, “One of our biggest problems in our Christian walk and growth and within the Church as a whole, is failing to act like God’s Word is true.” In other words, we do not believe God when He speaks.

Bishop Primus is not accusing us of being unbelievers, nor is he saying that we have no faith. He is simply saying the same thing Jesus told His disciples in Matthew  17: that their faith was too small to accomplish the greater things in the Kingdom. “You don’t have enough faith,”he said. The King James reads, “unbelief,” but this is not meant to be taken as no faith at all.

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