Tag Archives: Drop Out Nation

Fulton schools to hold showing of ‘Drop Out Nation’

by Andrew Henderson

The Fulton City School District will be holding a screening and discussion of “Drop Out Nation,” a film that follows a group of students in Houston, Texas.

“The Fulton City School District is committed to supporting the success of all of their students, in school and after they graduate,” said Superintendent of Schools Bill Lynch. “We recognize the importance of working with students, families, and community members to ensure that success.”

Lynch added that the district need to address chronic absenteeism, school drop outs, and impact of poor economic conditions in the community.

“To begin the important conversations about the solutions to these educational challenges, the Fulton City School District will be hosting a screening of the Public Broadcasting System Frontline program entitled ‘Drop Out Nation’,” said Lynch.

The screening will take place on Feb. 6 at 6 p.m. in the G. Ray Bodley High School Auditorium, with small group discussions to follow.

Dinner will be served and child care will be available on site for children ages four and older.

The film follows a group of students in Houston, Texas, to explore the challenges faced by students as they struggle to stay in school and administrators who are working against the odds to keep them there.

According to the organizers of the film, the average dropout can expect to earn an annual income of $20,241, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That’s a full $10,386 less than the typical high school graduate and $36,424 less than someone with a bachelor’s degree.

In addition, joblessness among those without a high school degree measured 12 percent. Among college graduates, it was 4.1 percent.

Also, statistics show that among those between the ages of 18 and 24, dropouts were more than twice as likely as college graduates to live in poverty, according to the Department of Education.

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